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symmakhos
Monday, May 15th, 2006, 07:36 PM
1. Gunnersmark Brooch, silver, 6th cent. CE, Denmark (Celtic-Germanic).

https://forums.skadi.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=59458&d=1147718009


2. Purse Cover from Sutton Hoo, gold, enamel and garnets, 625-633 CE, England (Hiberno-Saxon).

https://forums.skadi.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=59459&d=1147718009


3. Golden eagle or raven from Sutton Hoo shield

https://forums.skadi.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=59460&d=1147718009


4. Gold buckle from Sutton Hoo

https://forums.skadi.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=59461&d=1147718040


5. Royal sceptre from Sutton Hoo

https://forums.skadi.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=59462&d=1147718040


6. Sutton hoo shoulder clasp

https://forums.skadi.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=59463&d=1147718040


7. Sutton Hoo Purse Cover

https://forums.skadi.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=59464&d=1147718069


8. Sutton Hoo Necklace

https://forums.skadi.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=59465&d=1147718069


9. Tipperary Cross, 7th-8th cent. CE, Ireland (Hiberno-Saxon).

https://forums.skadi.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=59466&d=1147718069


10. Ship’s head, wood, c. 800-850 CE, Oseberg, Norway (Viking).

https://forums.skadi.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=59467&d=1147718101


11. Warriors wearing Boar-Topped Helmets, date unknown (plate from Torslunda, Öland, Sweden)

https://forums.skadi.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=59468&d=1147718101


12. Rune Stone, c. 987 CE, Denmark (by Harald Bluetooth)(Viking).

https://forums.skadi.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=59469&d=1147718101


13. Odinic Ritual Stone at Lärbro, Gotland, Sweden - Showing what appears to be an offering to Odin.

https://forums.skadi.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=59470&d=1147718119


14. Detail of 13

https://forums.skadi.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=59471&d=1147718119

Oswiu
Monday, May 15th, 2006, 09:57 PM
I was actually in the British Museum the other day, looking at a few of these masterpieces. Can't beat our forebears for taste, can ye? I might post a few of my pics when they're uploaded.

Incidentally, speaking of Sutton Hoo, does anyone know where the grave goods from the similar Essex burial that was discovered recently are? I'm dying to see them if it's at all possible. I suppose they're being restored and whatnot still, but would be interested to hear of what their future fate is intended to be.

larcher
Tuesday, May 16th, 2006, 01:35 AM
A lot of knot patterns are definitely Celtic.

Oswiu
Monday, June 5th, 2006, 12:56 AM
A lot of knot patterns are definitely Celtic.
A lot of so called 'Celtica' has Germanic or other precursors. Don't fall for the 'pop culture' definition of 'Celtic'! Find me a Celtic artefact with such knotwork from an earlier period, and I'll probably be able to find a Scythian one!

Theudiskaz
Monday, June 5th, 2006, 01:22 AM
A lot of so called 'Celtica' has Germanic or other precursors. Don't fall for the 'pop culture' definition of 'Celtic'! Find me a Celtic artefact with such knotwork from an earlier period, and I'll probably be able to find a Scythian one!I think most of the knot-work in Anglo-Saxon art is Celtic-derived. Some scholars think that Viking knotwork is largely celtic derived. And yes, ultimately it all of it is thought to be Scythian-inspired. You'd be hard-pressed to find any knotwork like that of the anglo-saxons among continental Germanic art. I think that only geometric patterns can be said to be truly Germanic, because that is the onlykind of patterning to be found in Germanic Art outside of England (and among early Anglo-Saxon art)in the migration period. But even this came from Scythian artwork originally. But it ain't Celtic.:thumbup

Oswiu
Monday, June 5th, 2006, 02:44 AM
I think most of the knot-work in Anglo-Saxon art is Celtic-derived. Some scholars think that Viking knotwork is largely celtic derived.

This is Celtic;
http://www.udel.edu/ArtHistory/nees/209/images/6-03.jpg
http://aco.ca/celtic/image/tene2.gif
It's not like the English knotwork. It's all swirly, and full of lobes, ellipses and leaf-shapes.
Our animal-knotwork is far more rigid and ordered. Once a creature's body has gone under another thing, it then must go over! Have you ever plaited anyone's hair? It's like that. The Celtic [and I mean pre-Christian stuff here, as after conversion there was a lot more exchange of motifs - see the Norse sculpture on both sides of the Irish Sea] stuff is far more fluid, with less rules. .

This sort of thing
http://www.missgien.net/pix/kells2a.gif
is from a later period.
And though the chronologies are difficult to prove, it may have English predecessors.
This is English, for instance;
http://rubens.anu.edu.au/htdocs/bytype/manuscripts/survey/0000/17.JPG

and see here;

Christian Celtic ArtWith the arrival of St. Patrick in the 5th century CE, full-scale conversion to Christianity took place, and monasteries became the principal artistic centers. Christian Celtic art consisted mainly of stone crosses, illuminated manuscripts, and metal objects such as chalices, shrines, and reliquaries. The art of this period utilized traditional Celtic curvilinear motifs enriched with foreign embellishments brought back to Ireland by returning missionaries - motifs such as the Saxon use of entwined, interlocking animal forms in geometric decorations.
The most impressive Celtic Christian art was produced from the late 7th to the early 8th century, both in Ireland and in Irish missions in Europe.
from www.missgien.net/ celtic/art.html (http://www.missgien.net/celtic/art.html)


You'd be hard-pressed to find any knotwork like that of the anglo-saxons among continental Germanic art.


Would you though? Both pictures = pre Viking Sweden
http://www.geocities.com/reginheim/art/sundbystone.jpg
http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/images/hb/hb_47.100.25ab.jpg

Alice
Saturday, February 16th, 2019, 06:55 PM
Anglo-Saxon jewellery :inlove

Harford Farm Brooch, made in Kent but found at Harford Farm in Norfolk. Dates from the early seventh century, with gold and garnet decorations.

http://www.hostpic.org/images/1902170018090101.jpg

Alice
Tuesday, February 26th, 2019, 09:47 AM
Another Anglo-Saxon treasure, the Alfred Jewel (Alfred the Great of Wessex!), made of gold, enamel and rock crystal. Dates from the late 9th century.

http://i65.tinypic.com/a263ox.jpg