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Nordraserei
Thursday, April 20th, 2006, 09:17 PM
How many Europeans are actually of only one nationality? It'd be nice to make a poll for European members to see how many of them are strictly of one nationality. It's too bad that the ones like Phleg would lie and say they're only one. ;)

Siegfried
Thursday, April 20th, 2006, 09:25 PM
How many Europeans are actually of only one nationality? It'd be nice to make a poll for European members to see how many of them are strictly of one nationality. It's too bad that the ones like Phleg would lie and say they're only one. ;)


I am unaware of any non-Dutch ancestry. Of course, if I would research my tree back far enough, things would surely pop up.

Theudiskaz
Thursday, April 20th, 2006, 09:55 PM
How many Europeans are actually of only one nationality? It'd be nice to make a poll for European members to see how many of them are strictly of one nationality. It's too bad that the ones like Phleg would lie and say they're only one.

I would think that many Europeans, especially those living in rural or isolated areas haven't had a foreign ancestor since the early middle ages. There are villages in Alpine Europe that were only accessible by rugged footpaths until sometime in the last century! Hallstatt is one example.

Jäger
Thursday, April 20th, 2006, 09:59 PM
How many Europeans are actually of only one nationality? It'd be nice to make a poll for European members to see how many of them are strictly of one nationality.
Indeed, the question which remains is why hypernation is not widespread then. I am 1/4th prussian and 3/4th franconian, still I consider myself strictly franconian in that regard, never even thought about calling me a Prussian-Frank, or something like that.

Zyklop
Friday, April 21st, 2006, 10:22 AM
How many Europeans are actually of only one nationality? It'd be nice to make a poll for European members to see how many of them are strictly of one nationality. It's too bad that the ones like Phleg would lie and say they're only one. ;)As far as genealogy is concerned, I estimate that, on an average, 90% of all Germans have less than 1/8 (one great-grandparent) non-German ancestors.

Allenson
Friday, April 21st, 2006, 02:00 PM
How many Europeans are actually of only one nationality? It'd be nice to make a poll for European members to see how many of them are strictly of one nationality. It's too bad that the ones like Phleg would lie and say they're only one. ;)

Certainly a good question.

Hell, in my own genealogical research, I uncovered amongst my many Dutch ancestors, several who had married Germans--particularly from near Bremen/Oldenburg (http://www.boydhouse.com/michelle/dehooges/barentvanrottmers.html). Throw a Norwegian (http://olivetreegenealogy.com/nn/surnames/bradt.shtml) in the mix and we have a veritable Germanic potpourri even before they came to the New Netherlands. ;)

Phlegethon
Friday, April 21st, 2006, 03:01 PM
How many Europeans are actually of only one nationality? It'd be nice to make a poll for European members to see how many of them are strictly of one nationality. It's too bad that the ones like Phleg would lie and say they're only one. ;)
Well, fortunately I can trace my family's history back till the mid-17th century (older records were destroyed in the Thirty Years War). The problem is that categories of nationality are hard to define in the 17th century, as there were no national states but only the Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation. Of course the name implies that is was inhabited by Germans, but of course there were ethnic minorities. Thinking in nowadays categories is kinda misleading, as Germans at that time lived in what is nowadays the Netherlands, Belgium, France, Poland, Denmark, Ukraine, Hungary, Czech Republic, Slovakia, Romania, Russia, Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania. My direct ancestors, however, were mostly from Westphalia (on my mother's side) and Berlin, Brandenburg, Silesia and Pomerania on my father's side. And despite Napoleonic occupation in the early 19th century (Westphalia) and Polish and Soviet occupation my family was German. Also keep in mind that back in those days societies were far less mobile than centuries later (both geographically and socially), because they had their farms, guilds and clans which kept them concentrated.

Daglaf
Wednesday, May 10th, 2006, 11:33 AM
I need to learn more about German history in the 16th - early 19th century.
Is there anything on this site that i could start with?

Blood_Axis
Wednesday, May 10th, 2006, 12:48 PM
Apart from the 1/4 anglosaxon ancestry I have from my mother, my father's bloodline traces back to Greeks that were originally descending from the old, aristocratic families of Constantinople that were appointed during the Byzantine Empire as princes of Moldova. They must have spent a lot of decades living at the Russian portion of the Black Sea (mainly Moldova & Ukraine). My late grandfather had grown up in Odessa and was bilingual: Russian and Greek. Recently, during his dying moments, he was whispering prayers in Russian. He was always reminiscing on those green fields of Ukraine where he grew up.

Despite the fact that his family returned to Greece when he was still at a very young age, I always thought he felt more Russian than Greek. He somehow had that imperial Czar-like aura around him.

Therefore, was I to list every small tinge of meta-ethnic influences in my bloodline, I would be a Greek-anglosaxon-moldovan-ukrainian-byzantine-European.

Hyphenated Americans, beat that! :D

symmakhos
Wednesday, May 10th, 2006, 01:17 PM
Byzantine aristocracy... Russian Czars... let's marry, shall we? :inlove

Hard to top that. My father's family comes from the north-easternmost (is that a word?) parts of Sweden, which is dominated by Finns (not immigrants, but indigenous, so called tornedalsfinnar). My paternal grandmother is native Finnish speaker. So I may be 1/4 Finn.

Huzar
Wednesday, May 10th, 2006, 03:28 PM
My all family originates from "Padania". More exactly, northern-western Italy, near the board with France, in that territory called by many OCCITANIA.

3/4 of my bloodyline traces back to the mid of 17th century 1650 in the area where i live.

Allenson
Thursday, May 11th, 2006, 12:42 AM
Apart from the 1/4 anglosaxon ancestry I have from my mother

I knew I liked you for some reason. ;)




Therefore, was I to list every small tinge of meta-ethnic influences in my bloodline, I would be a Greek-anglosaxon-moldovan-ukrainian-byzantine-European.

Hyphenated Americans, beat that! :D


That is a tough one to top--at least around these parts.

Brilliant! :thumbup