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Sigrun Christianson
Saturday, December 6th, 2003, 03:17 AM
How common is Döderlein? ;-)

Nordgau
Saturday, December 6th, 2003, 02:29 PM
How common is Döderlein? ;-)

According to the German national telephone book service in the Internet (http://www.dastelefonbuch.de), the Döderleins are with 88 (H... H.....!) results (they seem to be mostly concentrated in Bavaria and Leipzig) head and shoulders above the 5 Christiansons. These 5 Christiansons are also nothing against the 81 Erikssons.
Well, there will not arise a new Hitler in Germany (0 results), but with 32 Hittlers and a whole army of 508 Himmlers there's some hope for the future. ;)
And Goebbels's and Görings are even so many that the telephone book demands me to precisize the inquiry. :D

Nordgau
Sunday, December 14th, 2003, 05:26 PM
Die häufigsten 100 Nachnamen in Deutschland

Es soll in Deutschland über 500.000 verschiedene Familiennamen geben. Hier lesen Sie die 100 häufigsten.
Quelle : DUDEN Familiennamen. Herkunft und Bedeutung von über 20.000 Nachnamen. (Jahrgang 2000)

Sortiert nach Häufigkeit
1 Müller 324101 (siehe 44)
2 Schmidt 235760 (siehe 27, 31, 24)
3 Schneider 142095
4 Fischer 122941
5 Meyer 106352 (siehe 30, 34, 39)
6 Weber 106208
7 Wagner 97201
8 Becker 98445 (siehe 58)
9 Schulz 93344 (siehe 33, 45, 84)
10 Hoffmann 89412 (siehe 23)
11 Schäfer 75634
12 Koch 75082
13 Bauer 73958
14 Richter 72540
15 Klein 67924 (siehe 77)
16 Schröder 63928
17 Wolf 63337 (siehe 95)
18 Neumann 59445
19 Schwarz 55086
20 Zimmermann 53507
21 Krüger 53365
22 Braun 52731
23 Hofmann 51129 (siehe 10)
24 Schmitz 50776 (siehe 2, 27, 31)
25 Hartmann 50690
26 Lange 50196 (siehe 46)
27 Schmitt 49967 (siehe 2, 31, 24)
28 Werner 48792
29 Krause 48756 (siehe 69)
30 Meier 46581 (siehe 5, 34, 39)
31 Schmid 45845 (siehe 27, 2, 24)
32 Lehmann 45233
33 Schulze 45074 (siehe 9, 45, 84)
34 Maier 42741 (siehe 5, 30, 39)
35 Köhler 42575
36 Herrmann 42178
37 Walter 41548
38 Körtig 41408
39 Mayer 40975 (siehe 5, 30, 34)
40 Huber 39419
41 Kaiser 39284
42 Fuchs 38997
43 Peters 38492
44 Möller 37455 (siehe 1)
45 Scholz 37393 siehe 9, 33, 84)
46 Lang 36761 (siehe 26)
47 Weiß 36699
48 Jung 35095
49 Hahn 33372
50 Vogel 32679
51 Friedrich 32528
52 Günther 32441
53 Keller 32425
54 Schubert 32120
55 Berger 31767
56 Frank 31626 (siehe 64)
57 Roth 31519
58 Beck 30998 (siehe 8)
59 Winkler 30784
60 Lorenz 29067
61 Baumann 28630
62 Albrecht 27472
63 Ludwig 27085
64 Franke 27022 (siehe 56)
65 Simon 26879
66 Böhm 26775
67 Schuster 26423
68 Schumacher 26271
69 Kraus 26043 (siehe 29)
70 Winter 26036
71 Otto 25986
72 Krämer 25449
73 Stein 25391
74 Vogt 25328 (siehe 99)
75 Martin 25308
76 Jäger 24862
77 Groß 24170 (siehe 15)
78 Sommer 23929
79 Brandt 23273
80 Haas 23137
81 Heinrich 23030
82 Seidel 22801
83 Schreiber 22756
84 Schulte 22335 (siehe 9, 33, 45)
85 Graf 22239
86 Dietrich 21626
87 Ziegler 21557
88 Engel 21457
89 Kühn 21334
90 Kuhn 21259
91 Pohl 21069
92 Horn 20751
93 Thomas 20729
94 Busch 20726
95 Wolff 20523 (siehe 17)
96 Sauer 20313
97 Bergmann 20190
98 Pfeiffer 20009
99 Voigt 19959 (siehe 74)
100 Ernst 19926
SUMME 4.627.839 Personen


(I supplemented the thread title, as most of the talking here is about surnames.)

Dr. Solar Wolff
Friday, December 19th, 2003, 05:38 AM
I have an ancestor whose last name was Senft as in Senf (mustard). Can Thorburnulf or anyone else tell me something about this name? Was this man a mustard farmer or did he just have yellow hair or what?

Allenson
Friday, December 19th, 2003, 02:50 PM
Another request for Thorburnulf here. :)

During the American Revolution, the Brits hired a whole host of so-called "Hessians" to fight for them in America. I descend from one such "Hessian" who was actually from Hildesheim and served in the Braunschweig Regiment under Baron von Riedesel. He was in the Battle of Saratoga and perhaps Bennington. He eventually deserted the Brits and signed on with the Americans and saw some more action along the Hudson River. He stayed in America after the war and married a nice German or Dutch girl named Catherine Becker and settled in the Catskill Mountains of NY State.

Anyway, his name was Johann Daniel Engleke (sometimes seen as Englecke) and after a fashion, only became known as Daniel Angle. I'm curious about the name Engleke--what it might mean, it's commoness or lack of, etc. Any tips?

Here's a pic of where the farm he built after the war still clings to the hills:

Nordgau
Friday, December 19th, 2003, 06:24 PM
Okay, I looked up a few German name origin books...

The name "Senft" derives normally from the Middle High German word senfte which means the same as the Modern High German, today's word sanft: "soft", "gentle" etc.; thus "Senft" is a so-called Übername which a person got because of his character.
In some cases "Senft" derives also from the name for a mustard-maker, with the suffix -t added with the time.

"Engleke", I guess, is quite the same as "Engelke", which, as most Engel- names, derives from the old German name Engelhard. The suffix -ke is the Low German diminutive (High German: -chen or -lein).

Allenson
Friday, December 19th, 2003, 07:07 PM
Okay, I looked up a few German name origin books...

"Engleke", I guess, is quite the same as "Engelke", which, as most Engel- names, derives from the old German name Engelhard. The suffix -ke is the Low German diminutive (High German: -chen or -lein).


Thank you, Thorburnulf. I've certainly heard the name Engelhard before and yes, I believe I've seen the name spelled 'Engelke' as well.

cheers :-)

Dr. Solar Wolff
Saturday, December 20th, 2003, 07:18 AM
Thank you very much Thorburnulf. This is been a puzzle for our family for generations. If I can do anything for you in return, please just say the word.

Theudiskaz
Tuesday, April 11th, 2006, 10:06 PM
Could anyone tell me what the following German surnames mean and whether they are more common in a particular region? :Knack, Gildt, and Karst (My ancestors lived in a wasteland?)

I don't have my family tree with me at the moment, otherwise I would ask about other names.

OdinThor
Tuesday, April 11th, 2006, 10:33 PM
Knack is the geman word for (to) "crack".
Gildt should come from the word "Gilde". That is a corporation of craftsmen or tradesmen. Indicates upper class I think.
Karst is a special type of mountains. Anyway the name is spread mainly around the Pfalz or Eifel region.
56307
So these ancestors may come from that beautiful place.
56308

Theudiskaz
Tuesday, April 11th, 2006, 10:42 PM
Gildt should come from the word "Gilde". That is a corporation of craftsmen or tradesmen. Indicates upper class I think.

Well I know some of my German ancestors were carpenters, as far as I know the rest were farmers. And yes, I think the Karst's did come from Rheinland-Pfalz.:thumbup

OdinThor
Tuesday, April 11th, 2006, 10:52 PM
Well I know some of my German ancestors were carpenters, as far as I know the rest were farmers. And yes, I think the Karst's did come from Rheinland-Pfalz.:thumbup
Great. :thumbup The name Knack is a little funny. What could they have possibly been cracking?
The name itself is found in rural northern Germany. Mecklenburg, Niedersachsen etc.
56311
May have been the farmers.

Nordgau
Wednesday, April 12th, 2006, 12:14 AM
Knack: Low German variant of modern standard German Knochen (bone). Name for the Knochenhauer ("the one who hoes bones" = butcher).

Karst: Low German variant of the name Kersten/Kirsten which is derivation from Christian.--Karst also is a term for a double-pronged axe, and names of peasants, more in southern regions, as it seems, can be derived from it.

These is what Bahlow's surname dictionary gives; other explanations may be possible. There's no entry for "Gildt" or a similar variant, but Gilde means guild, and names like "Gildemeister" mean the chief of the guild, and there also seems to be a place name Gilde near Gifthorn.

Karst as name for a certain type of landscape is derived from the name of the region in the Italian-Slovenian-Croatian area. I doubt that any German surnames are derived from it ...

Zyklop
Wednesday, April 12th, 2006, 03:46 PM
karst
German: from Middle High German karst ‘mattock’, ‘hoe’, hence a metonymic occupational name for a maker or user of such tools.

Knack
variant of Knaack (http://www.ancestry.com/learn/facts/Fact.aspx?fid=10&ln=Knaack&fn=&yr=&).
nickname for a crude person or someone with a thick neck, from Bavarian genack ‘neck’.
shortened form of Knacker.
Knaack
North German: from Low German knaak ‘bone’, hence an occupational nickname for a butcher or possibly for a knacker, or a nickname for a bony, stocky, or crude person. Compare South German Knoch (http://www.ancestry.com/learn/facts/Fact.aspx?fid=10&ln=Knoch&fn=&yr=&).


Dictionary of American Family Names, Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-508137-4http://www.ancestry.com/learn/facts/Fact.aspx?fid=10&ln=

Theudiskaz
Wednesday, April 12th, 2006, 03:54 PM
Well thanks for all the help, guys, although we've got some diverse explanations!:)