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Evolved
Wednesday, October 1st, 2003, 10:01 PM
FRANKLIN, Tenn. - Relaxing on the verandah of a refurbished Victorian home turned tea room, Dot Fleming nibbled coconut pie and extolled the virtues of life in the South.

"It's just an easier, more relaxed lifestyle, with friendly people, home-cooking and big families," said the 55-year-old Fleming, whose family has lived in this affluent town south of Nashville since the early 1900s.

A new Vanderbilt University study found that the number of people like Fleming, who are fiercely proud to be called Southerners, is being noticeably diluted by newcomers and those who just plain reject the label.

From 1991 to 2001, the number of people living in the South who identified themselves as "Southerners" declined 7.4 percentage points, from about 78 percent to 70 percent.

The study found that only Republicans, political conservatives and the wealthy bucked this trend, keeping the same percentage of self-described "Southerners."

"As with other parts of the country, continuing urbanization and immigration have had an impact on the South," said sociology professor Larry Griffin, who headed the study.

The researchers analyzed data from 19 polls conducted by the University of North Carolina from 1991-2001 that asked respondents if they considered themselves Southerners. The findings will be included in the article "Enough About the Disappearing South What About the Disappearing Southerner?" as part of the fall edition of Southern Cultures, the journal of UNC's Center for the Study of the American South.

The polls surveyed 17,600 people in 13 states Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas and Virginia.

The decline spanned all races, ethnic and age groups, researchers said. But Republicans held steady at about 74 percent, political conservatives at 78 percent and the rich at 69 percent.

"Though the South has changed (over the decade), those three groups still see themselves as in the South or of the South," Griffin said. "For persons of color, the poor, for political liberals or Democrats, it may be an image they reject."

As for Fleming, she said she understands why conservatives continue to classify themselves as Southerners.

"In general, when you're conservative, you don't like change," said Fleming, who says she's probably in the upper middle class financially and neither conservative nor liberal.

Elouise North, a 79-year-old gift shop manager at Carter House, describes herself as both a Southerner and a conservative.

"It's a way of life," she said. "You don't rush things too much here. In my generation, you weren't rude, you had manners, you said 'Yes, ma'am' and 'No, ma'am.'"

North was born in Gallatin, 25 miles northeast of Nashville, but moved to Franklin 44 years ago after she married. During that time, she says she's seen so many new people move here that "it's no wonder" the number of self-described Southerners has dropped.

Source: http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&cid=519&ncid=519&e=18&u=/ap/20031001/ap_on_re_us/vanishing_southerners

Posted by rude, uptight Yankee ladygoeth33 :D

RoundskullBoredguy
Monday, October 27th, 2003, 12:17 AM
Well, that's sad. I don't really act like a Southerner at all, but I've lived in the South my entire life, so...I'm technically a Southerner, even though none of my grandparents were born within 165 miles of my birthplace.