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Iberic
Friday, January 20th, 2006, 11:03 AM
The company where I work made me a proposal to establish for them a new factory in Australia. If I accepted I will move to New South Wales with my family, wife and 3 daughters. For that reason I want to know what is the opinion that the Australians have about the “Latin” South Europeans (Portugueses, Spanishs and Italians)?

I am question you about this because after having read some posts here I got the impression that Australians can consider us wogs and not welcome to live in Australia.

Please be sincere at the replies therefore they will be important to me.

Vanir
Friday, January 20th, 2006, 12:31 PM
I got the impression that Australians can consider us wogs and not welcome to live in Australia.
Yes, this is correct. [Edit: Rule 8 violation removed]
Labour costs are expensive here anyway, so why would you bother? Not to mention the economy here will go in reverse, to one degree or another, once the inflated property market ungoes an inevitable correction. [Edit: Rule 5 violation removed]

Bridie
Saturday, February 11th, 2006, 01:18 PM
Maybe my answer is coming too late, but I'd just like to offer my opinion.... as a swarthy Southern European I would say that you and your family would be classed as wogs. If I were you, with 3 daughters, I wouldn't emigrate here for their sake..... they don't need to be exposed to that sort of prejudice. However, there are many wogs here in Australia, so if you wanted to be confined to a community of minorities (wogs) you will find acceptance and welcome, no doubt.

Generally speaking, I think most Australians welcome immigrants of NW European origin...... many Australians (not all of course) tend to be suspicious of those who aren't. I've seen many lovely people who aren't NW European emigrate to Australia only to have a difficult time of it. But that's only my personal experience, which is fairly limited, as I've never lived in a woggy area. In Perth there aren't many woggy areas really.

Best of luck Iberic.

Huzar
Saturday, February 11th, 2006, 07:05 PM
French people are considered southern european ? They're Wogs ? And Norther Italians too ? If it's so , the thing seems amazing to me...........

Bridie
Sunday, February 12th, 2006, 03:14 AM
LOL True Huzar. No, the French aren't considered to be wogs, I'm not sure about northern Italians. I don't think the Spanish or Portugese are technically (lol) considered wogs either, but they would surely be mistaken for them, and therefore possibly suffer prejudice. In any case, many Aussies believe that only those from NW Europe, in particular the British isles and Ireland are welcome in Australia. Then again, there are those that don't like immigrants at all.

You must understand that many Aussies have a British/Irish-centric notion of Europe if that makes any sense.(??) We are very isolated over here. Particularly in Western Australia.

I'm sure people's prejudices against wogs are far more extreme in the Eastern States of Australia, as they have a large wog population over there.

Many Western Aussies consider ourselves to be quite separate from the eastern staters in many ways. In fact, there is quite a bit of resentment for the eastern staters from some.

If a southern european was to immigrate to Australia, I think they would encounter less prejudice in West Australia. (Just my opinion!) :)

Weg
Sunday, February 12th, 2006, 04:50 AM
Reminds me of Americans mistaking Sikh for Muslims after 9/11. I hope French/N. Italians would not be mistaken so easily for wogs. Would they? :-O Anyway, I've not planned to visit Australia any soon. :D

Dr. Solar Wolff
Sunday, February 12th, 2006, 06:28 AM
Not that it is any of my business, but could someone define "wog" for me? Please don't pull any punches. I do support Australians and New Zealanders in almost all instances, so I want to know your words and their meaning.

Bridie
Sunday, February 12th, 2006, 07:55 AM
Dr Wolff (what's the time? - sorry, slight distraction there. :| ) - "wog" is a derogatory term used to describe people of Greek, Italian, Macedonian, Yugoslavian etc origin. HOWEVER, as with most derogatory terms in Australia, it is often used as a term of endearment too. Depends on how its said and in which context. Eg, The words "bastard" and "mongrel" can be quite insulting but..... 2 blokes greeting each other in a pub... "How ya going Dazza, ya old bastard!?" "Yeah, not too bad thanks Wozza, ya dozy mongrel!" You know, that sort of thing! :D

I've got a friend who went to a really woggy school over east, and she says that her best friend was Greek. Most days they would greet each other at school thus.... "How are ya Wog-Girl?" "Yeah good Skippy." :) Skippy (the kangaroo) is apparently a derogatory term for anglo Aussies. I've never heard it used here in West Aust. though.

Cheers!

Thruthheim
Sunday, February 12th, 2006, 10:28 AM
It's interesting, as in Britain, a "Wog" is a Negro.

Huzar
Sunday, February 12th, 2006, 11:23 AM
It's interesting, as in Britain, a "Wog" is a Negro.


Probably, Australians are much more conservative, on average, than English people, so they consider wog not only coloured people like asian and Africans, but every people who isn't Anglo-Saxon too..............

Bridie
Sunday, February 12th, 2006, 01:34 PM
Thruthheim - Really? A wog is a negro in England? That is strange. (To me)

Huzar - No, wogs are not asians nor Africans in Australia. I'm curious.... what makes you think Australians are more conservative than the English?

Here's an interesting thing - apparently scientists from overseas come to Western Australia to study the Italian populations due to our isolation over here. Italians in WA tend not to inter-marry or inter-breed with other racial/cultural types, so some recessive conditions (pathologies) not often found in other Italian populations of the world are becoming increasingly common here in WA due to a relatively small gene pool.

Strange, eh?

Apparently Perth WA is THE most isolated city (georaphically) in the world.

Thruthheim
Monday, February 13th, 2006, 04:02 PM
Thruthheim - Really? A wog is a negro in England? That is strange. (To me)



Yeah 'tis, have you ever come across the Golliwogs?
http://www.hersmine.com/Harley/gbluepants.jpg

http://www.gvsu.edu/english/cummings/Upton_war.jpg

They used to appear in Old Noddy Books by Enid Blyton, but, now revised, they are subject to political correctness and are banned as far as im aware, they are seen as Racist, although Blyton, isn't thought to have used them in a "Racist" manner.

I think, i am not sure, that maybe "Wog" came from them? I could be wrong, maybe Wog is even older and has other origins.

But to conclude, yes, Wog in Britain means Black/Negro/African ;)
[/URL]
[URL="http://www.hersmine.com/Harley/gbluepants.jpg"] (http://www.gvsu.edu/english/cummings/Upton_war.jpg)

Jack
Tuesday, February 14th, 2006, 01:58 AM
The company where I work made me a proposal to establish for them a new factory in Australia. If I accepted I will move to New South Wales with my family, wife and 3 daughters. For that reason I want to know what is the opinion that the Australians have about the “Latin” South Europeans (Portugueses, Spanishs and Italians)?

Where in NSW? It depends on where you go. If you're not in Sydney, IMO, you'll be fine. I'm in Melbourne (Victoria), down here wogs are 'accepted' insofar as theey're Italians or Greeks. Italians are IMO assimilated better than Greeks. Greeks are accepted because they don't cause too many social problems, but their culture is alien to our Anglo-Celt core culture. The Portuguese and Spaniards I've known tend to socialise more with the Italians than the Greeks.



I am question you about this because after having read some posts here I got the impression that Australians can consider us wogs and not welcome to live in Australia.

It varies. In Melbourne, 'wog' is a term for South European white trash. It sounds harsh but it's justified. In Sydney, it's basically applied liberally to non-Western European Caucasians. i.e. Greeks, Serbs, Croats, Turks, Lebo's, etc. There, wogs - particularly south east European and middle eastern trash - are hated. If you've kept track of the recent riots, you'll know what I mean by hated. If your family can all speak English fine and you're careful to move into an overwhelmingly Anglo-Celt neighbourhood, you should be ok. Your daughters will probably associate with them and be accepted.



Please be sincere at the replies therefore they will be important to me.



Of course.


French people are considered southern european ? They're Wogs ? And Norther Italians too ? If it's so , the thing seems amazing to me...........

No, the French aren't considered wogs. Unless you're talking to a really old fellow who smiles when you tell him you're French and he says 'the wogs begin in Calais' :D North Italians may or may not be considered wogs. Depends on how you act and dress etc.

Rhydderch
Tuesday, February 14th, 2006, 02:40 AM
I am question you about this because after having read some posts here I got the impression that Australians can consider us wogs and not welcome to live in Australia.Well, personally I wouldn't judge you differently from say a German immigrant. What I don't like is large numbers of foreigners coming in, but I wouldn't say a given individual is necessarily unwelcome.

BTW, by 'foreigner" I mean someone of non-British (Anglo-Celtic) stock.


Probably, Australians are much more conservative, on average, than English people, so they consider wog not only coloured people like asian and Africans, but every people who isn't Anglo-Saxon too..............Yes, sometimes it's used quite generically.

Gesta Bellica
Tuesday, February 14th, 2006, 08:28 AM
Just my 2 cents:
I have been in Australia for holidays and young people didn't look so much focused on race issues...i have seen many mixed groups of friends.
Probably people of the "old stock" think differently.
But nobody tried to guess my ethnicity while i was there, unlike americans that sometimes asked me if i was "this" or "that" while i was on holidays in the US.

Huzar
Tuesday, February 14th, 2006, 09:25 AM
.
But nobody tried to guess my ethnicity while i was there, unlike americans that sometimes asked me if i was "this" or "that" while i was on holidays in the US.


And generally they guessed correctly your nationality ?

Gesta Bellica
Tuesday, February 14th, 2006, 10:11 AM
And generally they guessed correctly your nationality ?
well..some guessed, some asked if me and my friend were German, Slavs, etc

Rhydderch
Tuesday, February 14th, 2006, 12:01 PM
Just my 2 cents:
I have been in Australia for holidays and young people didn't look so much focused on race issues...i have seen many mixed groups of friends.
Probably people of the "old stock" think differently.Australians are not generally hostile to foreigners, provided the latter don't provoke it. So people will have foreign friends, while not being unaware of differences. As Brigid mentioned, a friend might be called a wog in a non-derogatory way.


But nobody tried to guess my ethnicity while i was there, unlike americans that sometimes asked me if i was "this" or "that" while i was on holidays in the US.My understanding is that Australians tend to be less confident with strangers than Americans are. Less inclined to ask questions like that, even if they're wondering.

Jack
Tuesday, February 14th, 2006, 01:50 PM
Just my 2 cents:
I have been in Australia for holidays and young people didn't look so much focused on race issues...i have seen many mixed groups of friends.
Probably people of the "old stock" think differently.
But nobody tried to guess my ethnicity while i was there, unlike americans that sometimes asked me if i was "this" or "that" while i was on holidays in the US.

Times have changed. As I can see it, young kids are all too willing to draw a line in the sand along racial or cultural lines nowadays. Australian patriotism is increasingly widespread, and it's taking on the character it used to - Anglo-Celtic nativism. It's relatively subtle, but trip it off and its presence becomes blindingly obvious.

Tancred
Wednesday, February 15th, 2006, 12:07 AM
It's interesting that Australians still feel Anglo-Celtic. Obviously their isolation has contributed to this, however I feel that it's not so much ethnic background that is an issue with most Aussies as how the newcomers integrate in the Australian way of life etc. Many British people these days would find it very difficult to integrate into Australian society, despite the ethnic affinity - we've grown apart over the last few decades. I'm also sure that the word "Wog" is much less derogatory in Australia than it is in the UK. In the UK it's considered a 'hate' word, probably because it is directed against coloured people.






It's interesting, as in Britain, a "Wog" is a Negro.Not really. I'd say a "Wog" is a south Asian person. Believe it or not, the word "Wog" originally stood for "wealthy oriental gentleman".

Rhydderch
Wednesday, February 15th, 2006, 07:31 AM
It's interesting that Australians still feel Anglo-Celtic. Obviously their isolation has contributed to this, however I feel that it's not so much ethnic background that is an issue with most Aussies as how the newcomers integrate in the Australian way of life etc. Many British people these days would find it very difficult to integrate into Australian society, despite the ethnic affinity - we've grown apart over the last few decades.Actually, I know a young English fellow who visited here recently and was impressed by the cultural similarity between Australia and Britain. He felt that an Englishman would fit in relatively easily, and said he thought this explained why his countrymen were living here in fairly large numbers. But perhaps the similarity depends partly on what social background or region of England one is from.


I'm also sure that the word "Wog" is much less derogatory in Australia than it is in the UK.

In the UK it's considered a 'hate' word, probably because it is directed against coloured people.Officially, it would definitely be considered a 'hate' word. In politically correct terms, it'd be highly offensive, but I suppose many Australians have a habit of using offensive words in a more easy going way (like the 'bastard' example Brigid used earlier). However, people do still often use the word very offensively; so it really depends on the situation in which it's used.

Gesta Bellica
Wednesday, February 15th, 2006, 12:52 PM
Australians are not generally hostile to foreigners, provided the latter don't provoke it. So people will have foreign friends, while not being unaware of differences. As Brigid mentioned, a friend might be called a wog in a non-derogatory way.

My understanding is that Australians tend to be less confident with strangers than Americans are. Less inclined to ask questions like that, even if they're wondering.

Well, i have to say that according to my experience Australian looked quite friendly, sometimes unknown people in hotel's elevators or in pubs were saying a big smiling "hello, how are you" and started small talks..
Some people asked us where we were from..the interesting difference between Australians and Americans was that, the Aussies were asking while the Americans tried to guess in advance.
We found the average Australia really educated and social, my friend (who's not interested in racial issue) even considered Americans as more "racist", in a sense that they always try to cathegorize people but i wouldn't go so far..
These are just my impressions as Italian tourist anyway..

Gesta Bellica
Wednesday, February 15th, 2006, 12:56 PM
Actually, I know a young English fellow who visited here recently and was impressed by the cultural similarity between Australia and Britain. He felt that an Englishman would fit in relatively easily, and said he thought this explained why his countrymen were living here in fairly large numbers. But perhaps the similarity depends partly on what social background or region of England one is from.


I had the same impression, even if i am not Anglo-Saxon.
Culture and habits looked really "British", probably there are too many non Anglo-Saxons but their influence in the culture seems relegated in food stores and restaurants ;)
Surely the British roots are more evident in Australia than in USA.

Rhydderch
Wednesday, February 15th, 2006, 11:46 PM
Surely the British roots are more evident in Australia than in USA.Yes, actually the Englishman I mentioned has also been to the USA, and thought it was less British than Australia.

Thruthheim
Thursday, February 16th, 2006, 02:10 PM
Im English, i have visited Australia before, and can i just say, Most of the people have British Surnames, they look British, Road and place names are British and they speak English.

They have the Union Jack in the corner of their Flag and were spawned by the British. Is it any wonder the English/British can settle into Australia easily?

Racially and culturally quite the same.