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View Full Version : Who Here Is Frisian or Part Frisian?



The Black Prince
Wednesday, December 28th, 2005, 12:05 AM
I saw lots of polls of the same kind here on Skadi and now I was wondering.....:D

(BTW, this poll includes all Frisians, e.g Ost-Friesland, Nord Friesland, Friesland, West-Friesland, Frisians from long...long ago, etc..)

OK, here we go.

I'm Frisian, living in Fryslân (NL), also called Friesland.
From my fathers side they have almost all been dairyfarmer way back, all over this province (Bouhoeke, Greidhoeke, Wâlden).

My mothers side is also mainly Frisian (Stellingwerven, Greidhoeke), although there's also evidence that they have ancestors who came from the province Overijsel, around the beginning 19th. century, wich lays south of Friesland and is generally considered to be Saxon.

---------------------------------

the Dutch Province of Fryslân
http://www.fa.knaw.nl/files/2034/Taal%20yn%20Fryslân.jpghttp://www.loftsiler.nl/friesland.gif

NewYorker
Wednesday, December 28th, 2005, 12:20 AM
I saw lots of polls of the same kind here on Skadi and now I was wondering.....:D

(BTW, this poll includes all Frisians, e.g Ost-Friesland, Nord Friesland, Friesland, West-Friesland, Frisians from long...long ago, etc..)

OK, here we go.

I'm Frisian, living in Fryslân (NL), also called Friesland.
From my fathers side they have almost all been dairyfarmer way back, all over this province (Bouhoeke, Greidhoeke, Wâlden).

My mothers side is also mainly Frisian (Stellingwerven, Greidhoeke), although there's also evidence that they have ancestors who came from the province Overijsel, around the beginning 19th. century, wich lays south of Friesland and is generally considered to be Saxon.

---------------------------------

the Dutch Province of Fryslân
http://www.fa.knaw.nl/files/2034/Taal%20yn%20Fryslân.jpghttp://www.loftsiler.nl/friesland.gif Would you say that this woman looks stereotypically "Frisian" ?

http://www.deborahcorrigan.com/playboy/Playboy-16.jpg

The Black Prince
Wednesday, December 28th, 2005, 12:25 AM
NY,

Frisians consist of many phenotypes, if you want her phenotype to be classified take here to the Racial Classification part of this forum.

Don't Meta..thing here around :topic

The Black Prince
Wednesday, December 28th, 2005, 12:38 AM
I can't tell the difference between a Frisian and a Saxon so Frisians aren't Saxons.

'Neder-Saksisch' is a language spoken in the easthern part of the Netherlands. The people there consider themself to be 'Saksisch' as the Frisians consider themself to be 'Fries', also a lot of cultural difference existed and some even today between the Saxon part and the Frisian part.

It hasn't to do much with difference in phenotype, since its more about differences in language/culture and tradition.

Vestmannr
Wednesday, December 28th, 2005, 11:36 PM
Frisian ancestors from 1500-2000 years ago.

bhoostal
Saturday, December 30th, 2006, 01:38 PM
Frisian ancestry

Oswiu
Saturday, December 30th, 2006, 02:28 PM
Frisian ancestry

Me too, most likely, but VERY remote! ;)
http://forums.skadi.net/showpost.php?p=724878&postcount=2

Irby
Tuesday, March 30th, 2010, 04:39 PM
Not me, but my Girlfriends father is Frisian, although she is from Groningen so she really, really hates Frisians. No love loss between these two I guess.


Ain pronkjewail in golden raand
Is Stad en Ommelaand!

For any Grunners out there!!!!!

Ocko
Tuesday, March 30th, 2010, 05:07 PM
I am from close to Dornum, Ostfriesland.

My immediate ancestors have all been military guys (4 generations), other than that there were a lot of sailors and farmers.

The sailors knew all of the world but didn't know Germany 50 miles inland from the coast. None of those guys died the strawdeath. They lost their lifes in strange places like Surabaya, Indonesia the Irish Sea, Norwegian coast, Meditarreanian , the Dogger Bank and so on. They loved the sea more than their women.

velvet
Tuesday, March 30th, 2010, 05:27 PM
Maternal line is from Leer, Ost-Friesland, still a lot of family up there. Grandma was just driven down here during WWII and for some reason never returned home.

Very sad, the times I've been to the sea I've felt home immediately, the air, the waves, the wind, the colors of the sky... nothing of that down here :|

Bernhard
Tuesday, March 30th, 2010, 06:29 PM
Do people in Germany or people from Ost-Friesland themselves consider Ost-Friesland as Frisian as the Saterfrisian and the northern frisian regions? I was wondering this because linguistically Ost-Friesland is considered Saxon most of the times.

I have no Frisian ancestry or family by the way. Although... there are theories that the earliest Franks were a bunch of ancient Frisians (and Chauki).:D They had not much in common with the later Frisians though.

Sigurd
Tuesday, March 30th, 2010, 07:34 PM
A distant ancestor might have been a Frisian, it would explain the regular incidence of horse-faced individuals in my family. It is equally possible that said ancestor was Lipizzaner or Haflinger, though. :wsg

Oh wait, wrong type of Frisian ... nope, no Frisian ancestry I know of. Westphalian ancestry yes, but no ancestor was a seaside dweller, not even plains dwellers actually. Mountainfolk and Hillside folk, we are, through and through. :P

Soten
Tuesday, March 30th, 2010, 07:44 PM
My ancestor Jan Evertsen (http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.co m/~rclarke/page1/evert_j2.htm) was from Emden. ;)

Anyone know where this "Loockeren" is in Emden?

nordfrisk
Tuesday, July 27th, 2010, 06:55 AM
I am full frisian. and yes i do want a united frisia! (: frisia is north germanic not like the dutch in my eyes.

Bernhard
Tuesday, July 27th, 2010, 12:23 PM
I am full frisian. and yes i do want a united frisia! (: frisia is north germanic not like the dutch in my eyes.

In what way is Frisia north Germanic? Danes, Norwegians, Swedes, Icelandics and people from the Faeroer isles are north Germanic. Frisians however are not.

Loyalist
Tuesday, July 27th, 2010, 01:12 PM
I am insignificantly Frisian; I have a single ancestor from Tönning (or Taning, as the people in question call it). While in Amsterdam, she married a man from Limburg and settled in the New Netherland colony.

nordfrisk
Tuesday, July 27th, 2010, 03:26 PM
In what way is Frisia north Germanic? Danes, Norwegians, Swedes, Icelandics and people from the Faeroer isles are north Germanic. Frisians however are not.

I mean culturally we are more related to the scandinavian then the dutchman. our language however is a lot older than dutch,, much similar to old english and in some links old icelandic

Bernhard
Tuesday, July 27th, 2010, 06:31 PM
I mean culturally we are more related to the scandinavian then the dutchman. our language however is a lot older than dutch,, much similar to old english and in some links old icelandic

Although I don't know that much about the Frisians, I actually doubt that the Frisians have more in common with scandinavians. Frisians in the Netherlands are part of the Dutch nation and they live closer to other Dutch people than to any of the scandinavian countries. They share a history with the rest of the Netherlands and not with scandinavia. How could it be that Frisian culture would be more related to scandinavian culture than to other dutch cultures? Ethnically, culturally and linguistically they are part of the Dutch-German continuum in my eyes.

Frisian isn't older than Dutch by the way. Standardized Frisian is younger than standardized Dutch and when it comes to dialects you can't say that one of them is older, because languages and dialects constantly evolve. In the end both Dutch and Frisian descend from proto-germanic.

nordfrisk
Tuesday, July 27th, 2010, 08:30 PM
Although I don't know that much about the Frisians, I actually doubt that the Frisians have more in common with scandinavians. Frisians in the Netherlands are part of the Dutch nation and they live closer to other Dutch people than to any of the scandinavian countries. They share a history with the rest of the Netherlands and not with scandinavia. How could it be that Frisian culture would be more related to scandinavian culture than to other dutch cultures? Ethnically, culturally and linguistically they are part of the Dutch-German continuum in my eyes.that is where you are confused. many times dutch culture is the "commercial" culture of the netherlands much like how "bavaria" is the culture culture of germany with all the lederhosen, alps, and bier. however frisians live a lifestyle by the sea and have an entirely different cultural cuisine, dress, way of life, and an entirely different culture that unites us from the netherlands, to northern germany, to denmark... we share these identities. we are similar to the scandinavians because we have a common history seadwellers of whome both ruled the north sea at times and once frisian was one of the major languages of the trading system in the nordic countries. we were with the scandinavians the last to resist the tides of christianity and remain traditional germanic heathens and still to this day practice many of the old traditions. our culture is very unique.

however yes we are placed sometimes on the dutch-german continuem or west germanic languages however our language is only that way because it has been a minority language in 3 different countries for centuries to the point that west east and north frisian is harder to understand amongst the mainstream original frisian language that was one of its own. i say frisian is old because it is a very slowly evolving language due to a lack of native speakers,, only maybe a million or less speak the frisian language and less and less are teaching it to there children,, soon to probably be extinct.


Frisian isn't older than Dutch by the way. Standardized Frisian is younger than standardized Dutch and when it comes to dialects you can't say that one of them is older, because languages and dialects constantly evolve. In the end both Dutch and Frisian descend from proto-germanic.im pretty sure every germanic language comes from "proto-germanic" doesn't make it any the same. also i would like to campare the fact that frisians are more genetically similar to that of the scandinavians mostly due to a shared viking history shared trade ideals, customs. even surnames that sound very much of scandinavian origin are indeed very very common here is friesland such as Jansen, janssen, claassen, anderzen, knutzen, the whole -sen, -ssen from father naming process.:D

Hemerik
Saturday, October 2nd, 2010, 12:53 AM
My father's line is Frisian (once noble farmers in the Wâlden area), my mother's line is more generally Dutch.

I agree with Nordfrisk in that the Frisians have a strong historical connection with Norway and Danmark, as well as with England, because of the North Sea trade. I believe it is also true that linguistically there seems to be some minor Scandinavian influence in Old Frisian (it does have a certain Scandinavian ring to it, as I hear it) and conversely it has been argued that the Norse god Forseti may be of Frisian origin. Also, in Viking times Danes have ruled parts of Friesland. Saxo Grammaticus' Danish History and Beowulf's Finnsburg episode suggest that notable contacts existed several centuries before that.

Ocko
Saturday, October 2nd, 2010, 07:42 PM
Ost-Friesland was 'protected' from the saxons by a peat, with only a few tracks made by men. Sometimes in troubled times those tracks were redirected and the enemies sank in the peat and died.

Because of this protective peat the high-german language wave didn't reach Ost-Friesland and they remained the old german language which is different than Frisian, which, as mentioned above is still spoken in Saterland.

There is a close relationsship to danish. I can read newspapers in danish, though I don't understand every word the meaning of what is said is clear to me. The same is for nederlansk.

Eyala freya fresena.

Guntwachar
Thursday, November 11th, 2010, 09:31 PM
I'm partly Frisian, I have a few different family lines that go back to Frisia.
However most Dutch people will have atleast some Frisian ancestry aswell as Frankish and Saxon, Frisian ancestry is quite common in the Dutch coastal areas specially the Holland provinces as they were founded by Frisians.

JFreese
Tuesday, November 8th, 2011, 06:26 PM
My great, great grandfather, Andrew Christian Freese, came over from Denmark, which is my Danish - Friesian connection; however, I could use a little help in researching my lineage from there. If you anyone out there has a suggestion, idea or knowledge about the next step I might take in researching my background and ethnicity I would appreciate it. Thank you.

A Freese in Tulsa, OK.

Ferjo
Thursday, July 5th, 2012, 12:46 PM
Im from the Fryslân (Friesland) my ancestors as far as i can see come from the same part. A lot of people in (The Netherlands) have Frisian ancestry.
Grinslân (Groningen) was a part of the frisian Upstalbaum alliance, and yes there is some rivalry between Fryslân en Grinslân. This because of the expansion of Grins and dominating Dutch peoples which moved to Grinslân.

Fehde
Friday, August 17th, 2012, 06:57 PM
My grandmother was from North Frisia, from the island of Sylt more exactly.
She still has spoken the island dialect (Söl'ring),
unfortunately, I know only a couple of words.

Wikipedia article (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/S%C3%B6l%27ring)

Ocko
Thursday, March 24th, 2016, 06:07 AM
The Frisian and the Saxon had a strong alliance against Charlemagne's Christianity mission.

King Radbod of Frisia equally fought against Christianity and later Karl/ charles as Herzog Widukind of Sachsen.

As the Sachsen elites were murdered by Karl after he gave an oath that nothing would happen to them if they come without weapons to a meeting, many Sachsen didn't want to become christians and moved up to Denmark.

From there mostly exiled Sachsens started the Viking attacks on Franken. There was no attack on the Frisian lands until very late into the viking wars. It was mostly against Karls Franken and Angelsaxons and their christianity.

Sachsen and Frisian are also very close in language and culture and most likely bloodline. According to legends Frisia was founded by three brothers, Friso, Saxo and Bruno. It seems Frisians and Saxons therefore have been brother tribes.

Ocko
Thursday, March 24th, 2016, 06:35 AM
Also between the Danes and the Frisians there had been some close relationships. King Finn of Friesland had Danish warriors in his retinue (most likely King Finn had a Danish noble woman as a wife) Then there broke out a quarrel between the Frisian and Danes, in the End the leader of the Danes, Hengest, killed King Finn. Hengest then had to leave Frisian and went to Kent, to establish a Kingdom there.

The Skaldskaparmal in Snorris Edda is most likely about this event.

Also an episode in Beowulf is refering to this tragic event.

It seems that the Saxon had a similar close relationship to the Danes, as Herzog Widukind had a danish wife (she is buried in a stonegrave in Lower Saxony). After the defeat through Charlemagne many Saxons moved up north to Denmark and later to Iceland were many legends and myth from Germany found their ways into the Edda.

It might well be that the Danish, Frisians and Saxons were closely related.

Ocko
Thursday, March 24th, 2016, 03:21 PM
The three tribes Frisian, Saxon and Angeln (Danes) invaded what is now known as England. the three tribes had already old alliances.

The English language is closest to old Frisian, that suggests that English is an offspring of the frisian language and not from Saxon or Danish.

So we also should find a lot of frisian people in England and also in the USA therefore.

Sigurd
Thursday, March 24th, 2016, 04:13 PM
The English language is closest to old Frisian, that suggests that English is an offspring of the frisian language and not from Saxon or Danish.

That's hardly surprising as much of Frisia is even geographically closer to where they left from than the parts of Saxony are where records exist + even there records exist at a much later date. It was probably a dialect continuum of sorts, too.

Of course that only applies to old Frisian and old English. Oh, and you forgot to mention the Jutes. Basically everything that came from that corner, which also explains how burial mounds ended up with the appellative barrow which is cognate to German Berg, which is particularly amusing for someone living with mountains to either side. :P

Huginn ok Muninn
Thursday, March 24th, 2016, 05:06 PM
The Angles were a tribe distinct from the Danes, who at the time lived on Sjćlland and in Scania. Only after the Angles and Jutes had almost completely abandoned Jutland for the British Isles did the Danes migrate westward to fill the space.

It may be that the Angles were kindred of the Frisians, which could explain some of the linguistic similarity, but there are not really any Angles left, except in England, because more than any of the three tribal components, they moved out of the continent wholesale. Maybe the North Frisians are a remnant?