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Loki
Tuesday, September 16th, 2003, 05:25 PM
I am sure at least every American here will be aware of the approaching storm - currently a Category 3 hurricane (Saffir-Simpson scale (http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/aboutsshs.shtml)) - even though it used to be a Cat. 5 earlier on in the tropical Atlantic.

The most recent satellite picture of this magnificent storm:

http://www.goes.noaa.gov/GIFS/ECIR.JPG

Tryggvi
Tuesday, September 16th, 2003, 06:06 PM
http://i.cnn.net/cnn/interactive/weather/0309/isabel.tracker/isabel.tracker.tuesday.jpg

Allenson
Tuesday, September 16th, 2003, 06:08 PM
Nice satellite image, Loki!

I used to crew on a "tall-ship" and I've had to work through several hurricanes. It's fun but scary all the same. I've actually never been a part of a 'direct hit'.

I live about 150 miles inland now though. Isabel is supposed to bring some rain and wind to my area on Friday but the landmass will surely somewhat neuter the storm's ferocity. The last one to make it up my way was Floyd in 1999.

Loki
Tuesday, September 16th, 2003, 06:10 PM
Nice satellite image, Loki!



:) The good thing about this site allowing [img] imaging, is that it draws the current internet image - in this case my first post will always show the latest available picture - just keep refreshing!! :D

Loki
Tuesday, September 16th, 2003, 06:14 PM
Nice satellite image, Loki!

I used to crew on a "tall-ship" and I've had to work through several hurricanes. It's fun but scary all the same. I've actually never been a part of a 'direct hit'.

I've about 150 miles inland now though. Isabel is supposed to bring some rain and wind to my area on Friday but the landmass will surely somewhat neuter the storm's ferocity. The last one to make it up my way was Floyd in 1999.

Okay, please keep us informed, dalonord!

I love these sort of storms... I used to track and investigate tropical cyclones that came ashore in Mozambique from the Indian Ocean. They are usually weaker than the Atlantic ones you get in the US, and their ferocity is usually broken when moving over Madagascar before reaching Mozambique or South Africa. We had big cyclone hit South Africa in 1984 (Demoina).

Tryggvi
Tuesday, September 16th, 2003, 06:19 PM
http://www.ssd.noaa.gov/PS/TROP/DATA/RT/NWATL/VIS/20.jpg

Tryggvi
Tuesday, September 16th, 2003, 06:22 PM
http://www.ssd.noaa.gov/PS/TROP/DATA/RT/NWATL/WV/20.jpg

Pomor
Tuesday, September 16th, 2003, 06:22 PM
Hurricanes are fun but not as fun as snow-storms though :D. I also dont think it is much fun for those who have houses and families over there. I wish I was on the east coast right now.

Loki
Tuesday, September 16th, 2003, 06:23 PM
The one you posted is even nicer Tryggvi!

:popcorn

Allenson
Tuesday, September 16th, 2003, 06:27 PM
Okay, please keep us informed, dalonord!

I love these sort of storms... I used to track and investigate tropical cyclones that came ashore in Mozambique from the Indian Ocean. They are usually weaker than the Atlantic ones you get in the US, and their ferocity is usually broken when moving over Madagascar before reaching Mozambique or South Africa. We had big cyclone hit South Africa in 1984 (Demoina).


If there's anyone on this forum from the mid-Atlantic area, they'll likely have a better view than I!

That's interesting about the Indian Ocean storms. Of course I know of our Atlantic hurricanes and also the Pacific typhoons (South Korea apparently was just hit) but I had wondered about the Indian before....

Yes indeed, big storms can be very exciting.....and yes Wend, nothing beats a good blizzard and a piping woodstove on a Vermont night in February!

Almost time to wax up the skis!

Tryggvi
Tuesday, September 16th, 2003, 06:33 PM
http://wtoc.static.worldnow.com/images/incoming/tropical/isabel/n17_0915_vis.jpg

More Images:
http://www.wtoctv.com/Global/link.asp?L=98798&nav=0qq7HyjV

StrÝbog
Tuesday, September 16th, 2003, 06:34 PM
She's swinging further north than is usual for 'canes. West Virginia usually isn't considered a high-risk hurricane area. :) I remember when Bob made it all the way up to New England... At least Charleston is being spared this time around, the beachfront property usually gets destroyed every 5 or 10 years. If we have any posters in the mid-Atlantic, they'd better batten down the hatches. :fsailor:

Loki
Tuesday, September 16th, 2003, 06:36 PM
That's interesting about the Indian Ocean storms. Of course I know of our Atlantic hurricanes and also the Pacific typhoons (South Korea apparently was just hit) but I had wondered about the Indian before....



Our cyclone season ranges from December to March, sometimes April, with the most intense month being February. These tropical storms are frequent in the Mauritius - La Reunion area, and Madagascar gets hit by a cyclone about once a year I think, if not more - in varying degrees of intensity. Madagascar is one of the best places to experience and observe Indian Ocean tropical cyclones.

The best resource for tracking Indian Ocean storms is the Hawaiian-based Joint Typhoon Warning Center (yes - I know Hawaii is in the Pacific :) ).

Allenson
Tuesday, September 16th, 2003, 06:40 PM
She's swinging further north than is usual for 'canes. West Virginia usually isn't considered a high-risk hurricane area. :) I remember when Bob made it all the way up to New England... At least Charleston is being spared this time around, the beachfront property usually gets destroyed every 5 or 10 years. If we have any posters in the mid-Atlantic, they'd better batten down the hatches. :fsailor:

Yup, Bob was one of the ones I sailed through....1991 I think?

As they say in Maine: "that one was a cocker!" :)

Are you in WV Stribog?

StrÝbog
Tuesday, September 16th, 2003, 06:45 PM
Yup, Bob was one of the ones I sailed through....1991 I think?

As they say in Maine: "that one was a cocker!" :)

Are you in WV Stribog?

No, I'm safe and sound in the boring ol' lower Midwest where the only natural disasters that ever occur are flooding and tornadoes. I miss my New England childhood...

@Loki when you say cyclone I think you mean what we call typhoons? In America a cyclone is a whirlwind/tornado, not a marine storm.

Loki
Tuesday, September 16th, 2003, 06:52 PM
@Loki when you say cyclone I think you mean what we call typhoons? In America a cyclone is a whirlwind/tornado, not a marine storm.

Tropical cyclones (the accepted generic term) are called different names in different regions:

Atlantic Ocean - Hurricanes

Indian Ocean - Tropical Cyclones

Australia - Tropical Cyclones or Willy Willies

Pacific/Japan/China - Typhoons


Correct, I am not referring to tornadoes. One tropical cyclone may contain many tornadoes, although they are not usual within TC's.

Tryggvi
Tuesday, September 16th, 2003, 06:53 PM
http://a.abclocal.go.com/images/wabc/2003/wabc_091503_isabel1.jpg

http://a.abclocal.go.com/images/wabc/2003/wabc_091503_isabel3.jpg

http://a.abclocal.go.com/images/wabc/2003/wabc_091503_isabel4.jpg

Tryggvi
Tuesday, September 16th, 2003, 06:59 PM
http://sirocco.accuweather.com/adc_hurr_images/2003/ai/USHAI_2003-09-16_16.JPG

Tryggvi
Tuesday, September 16th, 2003, 07:03 PM
http://sirocco.accuweather.com/adc_hurr_images/2003/ai/UHAI_2.GIF

cosmocreator
Tuesday, September 16th, 2003, 07:40 PM
Australia - Tropical Cyclones or Willy Willies

:cheer Leave it to Australians to call a storm Willy Willies.

Loki
Wednesday, September 17th, 2003, 09:46 PM
Here's a nice pic I saw on the net of the approaching Isabel:

http://members.cox.net/midnightstangz/StormatSea.gif

Italia_Ariana
Wednesday, September 17th, 2003, 10:59 PM
Very nice pic, Loki! That hurricane looks very... majestic I think is the right English word. :)

Phlegethon
Thursday, September 18th, 2003, 02:44 AM
I hope the whole east coast gets completely wiped out. There are still a few skyscrapers left in New York to level.

Ewergrin
Thursday, September 18th, 2003, 04:55 AM
Here's a nice pic I saw on the net of the approaching Isabel:

http://members.cox.net/midnightstangz/StormatSea.gif

Quite an imposing image! That is a spectacular photo. I am just thankful that it is not coming to my area, which they usually do.

My daily commute to work takes me across the worlds longest bridge, and often times the sky looks indentical to that.

Nordhammer
Thursday, September 18th, 2003, 01:59 PM
Not to ruin the mood, but this reminds me of some Negress who complained that hurricane names are too "white." Considering they're so destructive, maybe it would be better to name them after blacks. :D

I read that originally they were always named after women, because they're unpredictable and destructive. :P They had to stop doing that though because the Jews were changing our culture through the civil rights and feminist movement.

Allenson
Thursday, September 18th, 2003, 03:42 PM
Not to ruin the mood, but this reminds me of some Negress who complained that hurricane names are too "white." Considering they're so destructive, maybe it would be better to name them after blacks. :D



Hurricane Tomika? ;)


http://www.worldnetdaily.com/news/article.asp?ARTICLE_ID=33896

Allenson
Thursday, September 18th, 2003, 03:49 PM
Here's a nice pic I saw on the net of the approaching Isabel:

Wow, excellent photo!

It's supposed to go a bit west of where I live after it comes inland. We are still expecting to see some rain (perhaps only 1") and E-SE winds topping out at 30 mph in the valleys and up to 50 mph on the ridgelines and mountain summits. I live half way up a ridge at about 1000' above sea-level with exposure to the east and south-east so.....I may see some pretty good winds, though nothing like what coastal areas will experience.

StrÝbog
Thursday, September 18th, 2003, 06:39 PM
Yo damn, dis be Huh'icane Shonqueesha! :negress

cosmocreator
Thursday, September 18th, 2003, 08:21 PM
Not to ruin the mood, but this reminds me of some Negress who complained that hurricane names are too "white." Considering they're so destructive, maybe it would be better to name them after blacks. :D


Or maybe Hurricane Abraham, Hurricane Moses, Hurricane Judah.