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Phlegethon
Sunday, September 14th, 2003, 07:03 PM
http://www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/auth/friedrich/cross.jpg



The German romantic painter Caspar David Friedrich, b. Sept. 5, 1774, d. May 7, 1840, was one of the greatest exponents in European art of the symbolic landscape.

He studied at the Academy in Copenhagen (1794-98), and subsequently settled in Dresden, often traveling to other parts of Germany. Friedrich's landscapes are based entirely on those of northern Germany and are beautiful renderings of trees, hills, harbors, morning mists, and other light effects based on a close observation of nature.

Some of Friedrich's best-known paintings are expressions of a religious mysticism. In 1808 he exhibited one of his most controversial paintings, The Cross in the Mountains (Gemaldegalerie, Dresden), in which--for the first time in Christian art--an altarpiece was conceived in terms of a pure landscape. The cross, viewed obliquely from behind, is an insignificant element in the composition. More important are the dominant rays of the evening sun, which the artist said depicted the setting of the old, pre-Christian world. The mountain symbolizes an immovable faith, while the fir trees are an allegory of hope. Friedrich painted several other important compositions in which crosses dominate a landscape.

Even some of Friedrich's apparently nonsymbolic paintings contain inner meanings, clues to which are provided either by the artist's writings or those of his literary friends. For example, a landscape showing a ruined abbey in the snow, Abbey with Oak Trees (1810; Schloss Charlottenburg, Berlin), can be appreciated on one level as a bleak, winter scene, but the painter also intended the composition to represent both the church shaken by the Reformation and the transitoriness of earthly things.

Phlegethon
Sunday, September 14th, 2003, 07:05 PM
http://www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/auth/friedrich/friedrich.wanderer-sea-fog.jpg

Phlegethon
Sunday, September 14th, 2003, 07:07 PM
http://www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/auth/friedrich/tree.jpg

cosmocreator
Sunday, September 14th, 2003, 08:05 PM
I like his style.

Milesian
Sunday, September 14th, 2003, 08:22 PM
I like his style.

I agree. It is not often that a work of art moves me but these are quite spectacular.They are very atmospheric.

Braveheart
Friday, October 24th, 2003, 01:31 PM
CDF is my favorite artist. I really get moved by the "dreariness" of his paintings. He is very underrated, if you ask me.

Click below for many more of his paintings:

http://www.artrenewal.org/asp/database/art.asp?aid=179

hardcorps
Monday, October 27th, 2003, 02:05 PM
Exquisite! His landscapes really make me envy those of you are in our ancestral homelands of Mother Europe.

dacoit
Friday, November 28th, 2003, 09:17 PM
What about his picture of the grave of Ulrich von Hutten, one of the Imperial Knights who raised the flag of Protestantism in the Knights' War in the 1520s against the Habsburg Karl V?

Kräuterhexe
Sunday, October 16th, 2005, 06:44 PM
Caspar David Friedrich, 1774-1840

Kräuterhexe
Tuesday, October 18th, 2005, 12:51 AM
Caspar David Friedrich, 1774-1840

TisaAnne
Wednesday, January 4th, 2006, 08:32 AM
*Sorry for the massive selection of large images. If your computer is slow... please bear with it, as these gems are definetly worth the wait.*

The following is a wonderful selection of some of C.D. Friedrich's most enchanting landscape paintings, along with descriptive commentaries of each art piece, set forth in a chronological descent. Enjoy. :)


German Romanticism
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http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b184/eydi/77ed25d2.jpg
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Caspar David Friedrich
1774 - 1840

Brief Biography (http://www.artonline.it/eng/biografia.asp?IDArtista=96)


"Friedrich [was] the sole landscape painter who had the power to move every part of my soul; the one who created a new genre: The Tragedy of Landscape," wrote sculptor, Pierre-Jean David d'Angers.
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Dolmen in the Snow - 1807
oil on canvas

http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b184/eydi/a391be7.jpg

The dolmen (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dolmen) portrayed here is probably one which stood near Gützkow, and which was removed between 1825 and 1829. Together with his drawing master (Johann Gottfried Quistorp), Friedrich made several excursions to prehistoric burial sites.
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Monk by the Sea - 1809
oil on canvas

http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b184/eydi/fb85c30c.jpg

"A vast endless expanse of sky ... still, no wind, no moon, no storm - indeed a storm would have been some consolation for then one would at least see life and movement somewhere. On the unending sea there is no boat, no ship, not even a sea monster, and in the sand not even a blade of grass, only a few gulls float in the air and make the loneliness even more desolate and horrible."
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The Abbey in the Oakwood - 1809/10
oil on canvas

http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b184/eydi/72be63ab.jpg

The Abbey in the Oakwood is an expression of grief at the loss of a great past. The artist has chosen to depict an architectural ruin; it may testify to the sublimity of the past, but it is a monument in a graveyard.

The Napoleonic invasion of Germany, and the consequent War of Liberation, had added a patriotic dimension to Friedrich's subjects of north German ecclesiastical buildings in ruins or, in imagination, raised again. While the essential message of the Abbey in the Oak-wood of 1810 is the passing of the earthly life, its fog-bound ruin and blasted, leafless trees inevitably evoked the contemporary state of Germany.
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Morning in the Riesengebirge - 1810/11
oil on canvas

http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b184/eydi/ad75daef.jpg

With his friend Kersting, Friedrich had made a tour of the mountainous area near Dresden known as 'Saxon Switzerland', in the summer of 1810. Morning in the Riesengebirge, painted shortly afterwards, is another exposition of his theme of the cross on a peak. The planes of earth and sky, representing the bodily and the infinite, are bridged by the crucifix, lit by the morning sun.
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Winter Landscape with Church - 1811
oil on canvas

http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b184/eydi/3aece.jpg

Winter Landscape was painted with surprisingly few pigments, suggesting that Friedrich was less interested in colour than in smoothly graduated tones. He achieved the striking effect of shimmering, transparent haze by careful stippling with the point of the brush, using a blue pigment - smalt - which is transparent in an oil medium.
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Winter Landscape - 1811
oil on canvas

http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b184/eydi/604aab0.jpg

This version of Winter Landscape is characterized by the sombreness of an expanse of snow stretching away into the infinite distance, which modern interpreters see as a symbol of death; a nihilistic sign of doom.
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The Chasseur in the Forest - 1814
oil on canvas

http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b184/eydi/7c3a233.jpg

The French occupation of Germany was also the period of the painter's first success, much of which he owed to his adoption of specifically nationalist themes. When in 1814 he celebrated the expulsion of the French, it was with The Chasseur in the Forest, a haunting image of a solitary French dragoon lost in a wood of evergreens. It is a compassionate picture: the invader's fate is just and inevitable, but also sad, and seems to belong to the same higher natural destiny as the forest's vigorous growth.
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Neubrandenburg - c. 1817
oil on canvas

http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b184/eydi/10b41.jpg

Soaring high above the town, which is seen in silhouette from the north-east, is the slender spire of the Marienkirche. The hilly landscape on the horizon, above which grandiose banks of clouds unfurl into an enormous sky, is the product of pure imagination. This has led some art historians to conclude that the work is not intended as a straightforward veduta, but as a glorification of Gothic Neubrandenburg (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neubrandenburg). The two men on the track in the foreground (not visible in this particular image, sorry! :redface:) stand motionless beside what is probably a dolmen, and contemplate the cityscape in the distance. Opinions differ as to whether the lighting conditions represent sunrise or sunset. Like the bushes shedding their leaves in the foreground, the migratory birds in the sky, probably storks, serve as pointers to approaching winter and thereby to death.
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The Wanderer above the Mists - 1817/18

http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b184/eydi/55695e8a.jpg

In this painting Friedrich shows a lonely figure confronting nature in astonished reverence.

Friedrich's figures who habitually turn their backs to gaze into the horizon or stare from windows with rapt attention are images of the artist. His Wanderer, frock-coated and stick in hand, has climbed to a rocky peak above swirling mountain mists; the viewer looks with his eyes, the angle of vision being exactly aligned to their level in the picture space. The foreground, the conventional plateau to give the viewer a fix on the subject, has been entirely dispensed with.
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Chalk Cliffs on Rügen - c. 1818
oil on canvas

http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b184/eydi/a326757a.jpg

The painting was painted in recollection of the artist's honeymoon. We may assume that the figures are the painter, his wife, and his brother Christian. Again a double meaning is apparent, and the first impression of light and happiness is counteracted on a closer inspection. The three have ventured right up to the edge of the precipice. The man on the right is relying on the bush to prevent him from falling, while the woman is securing her hold by sitting down, and is also clutching a bush while she points down. The oddest figure is the painter himself; his hat seems to have fallen in the grass or been tossed down in haste. He has crawled to the edge, felling his way carefully, as if wishing to plumb the dizzying depth into which his companion is pointing. The double meaning between recollected experience and the "profound depth" of the symbols of life is evident. The view of the sea with the two sailing boats looks like a chasm that has opened beneath the figures, framed by the cliffs and the intertwining tops of the tress.

With this daring construction Friedrich has succeeded in making a visual combination of two extremes: the plunging ravine with its view of the sea and at the same time the endless horizon.
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Two Men Contemplating the Moon - 1819-20

http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b184/eydi/e391ac.jpg

In this ethereal painting, human and natural symbolism are subtly interwoven. The moon, an old Christian sign of hope, gleams from behind a withered tree, watched by two men, perhaps the artist and a pupil, in the 'old German' costume favoured by the resistance movement during the years of Napoleonic occupation. Painted after this threat had lifted, the picture links past, present and future through the cycles of time and season and the intercession of their human observers.
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Drifting Clouds - c. 1820
oil on canvas

http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b184/eydi/bea4c67.jpg

Having barely changed at all right into the 1820s, Friedrich's style now began to show signs of a subtle evolution. His formerly somewhat reserved, dry, often monochrome use of colour now began to give way to a more differentiated palette. Passages of glaze are complemented by areas of impasto; the colour range is frequently enhanced with very light values, and Friedrich's handling of paint becomes looser and somewhat more spontaneous. English influences, from Constable or others working in a similar vein, may account for Friedrich's interest in cloud studies. Drifting Clouds is an example of these studies.

This small composition is probably identical to a work recorded in Dresden in 1859 and described as portraying a Riesengebirge landscape with the source of the Elbe.
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View of the Baltic - 1820/25
oil on cavas

http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b184/eydi/ae9b766.jpg

This view probably combines elements of Bohemia's low-lying mountains with quotations from the coastal landscape of the island of Rügen.
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Moonrise by the Sea - c. 1821
oil on cavas

I found two color versions of this painting, and I'm not sure which exposure/saturation level the original might have had... so, I've included them both, for reference, as the lighter one shows much more of the painting's subject detail. :)

http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b184/eydi/c9d4472d.jpg

http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b184/eydi/3c7f7d35.jpg

In the 1820s and 1830s, the Russian court purchased a number of works by Friedrich at the suggestion of the poet and state councillor Zhukovsky (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vasily_Zhukovsky). These included the beautiful, large-format Moonrise by the Sea, which is dated fairly unanimously to around 1821. A contemporary description of the painting says that two men have clambered across the rocks a long way out into the shallows and appear to be waiting for a ship. Their two female companions are seated more in the foreground. Two massive anchors take the place of vegetation, which is here reduced simply to some saltwater plants.
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Morning in the Mountains - 1822-23
oil on canvas

http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b184/eydi/902bfa0e.jpg

This large-format painting was probably purchased by the future Alexander II of Russia, whose collection also included Moonrise by the Sea (also in the Hermitage (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hermitage_Museum)). Its vast panorama has often been interpreted as a vision of the hereafter, although the pastoral staffage in the foreground lends the whole the quality of an idyll, and the rocky terrain can in fact be accessed via the path that runs at least as far as the steep cliffs in the middle ground. Opening up in front of the tiny shepherds on the rocky pinnacle, so we assume, is a view down into the dizzying depths below and beyond the track and cliffs into the infinite distance - a view yielding an impression of the sublime.
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The Tree of Crows - c. 1822
oil on canvas

http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b184/eydi/6c852660.jpg

The Tree of Crows is pessimistic in mood, it is a painting founded upon strong colour contrasts. The hillock in the centre of the composition probably represents one of the dolmens on Rügen; the island's bluffs and long, narrow reef running far out into the sea are visible in the left-hand background. The bare oak tree with its bizarrely twisted branches goes back to studies made considerably earlier in Friedrich's career. In contrast to the ravaged trees around it, it obstinately stands up to every storm. A striking note within the painting is sounded by the red of the stumps and tree debris, which together with the crows or ravens announce disaster and death.
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Village Landscape in Morning Light (The Lone Tree) - 1822
oil on canvas

http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b184/eydi/89c877cd.jpg

This painting seems fairly realistic at first sight. The composition is not the product of a single, specific visual impression, however, but is highly artificial, being composed of no less than six individual studies which Friedrich executed between 1806 and 1810. The landscape-format composition presents a plain extending without interruption into the background, seen as if the viewer were standing on the gentle rise which begins in the bottom left and right-hand corners. From here, our gaze falls upon a small pond - to which no path leads - and upon a huge oak tree, which looks at first sight to be fairly close by. Once our eyes have also registered the diminutive figure of a shepherd leaning against its trunk, however, the tree suddenly appears further away and hence gigantic. Aspects of proximity and distance are permanently chafing against each other throughout the painting, whereby rational everyday experience is thwarted by visual irrationality. While an idyll of unspoilt nature unfolds around the oak and the shepherd, the villages and church spires of the land developed by man are as it were concealed and compressed within a valley by the mountains and the sky high above. All this points to an overall symbolism in which the oak tree, monumentalized to the status of protagonist, is a metaphor for growth and decay or for human life in general.
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Moonrise by the Sea - c. 1822
oil on canvas

http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b184/eydi/acc49e3b.jpg

Evening now replies to morning. The annual round subjugates humankind to its law. Distances can no longer be gauged in rational terms, so that water, ships, moon and sky open up a dream world extending between yearning and melancholy, between near and far, between this world and the universe. Looking becomes meditative contemplation.
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Meadows near Greifswald - c. 1822
oil on canvas

http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b184/eydi/a3f29457.jpg

Friedrich's native town becomes a symbol of longing for a better world. The prancing horses, the geese and the pond reflecting the sky reinforce the sense of idyll.
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Rocky Ravine - 1822-23

http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b184/eydi/94ff59bc.jpg

Friedrich's emotionally saturated imagery, the visual language of atmospheric and "ideal" painting alike, stood in blunt contradiction to the Realist tendencies emerging in Germany at that time, as seen above all in the work of the Düsseldorf School (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/D%C3%BCsseldorf_School). Friedrich emphatically rejected pure fidelity to life, the mere imitation of what was perceived by the human eye. Only on a few occasions does Friedrich appear to have attempted a more realistic approach, as for example in the unusually dramatic Rocky Ravine. Untamed nature is here portrayed with a descriptive detail that betrays the influence of Friedrich's fellow artist Dahl (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johann_Christian_Dahl), who had specialized in precisely such a style.

The sandstone formation in the background stands on the Neurathen ar the Elbsandsteingebirge (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elbe_Sandstone_Mountains) mountains. The rocks are portrayed larger than in real life, and Friedrich has introduced a deep ravine beneath the tallest pinnacle.
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The Sea of Ice - 1824
oil on canvas

http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b184/eydi/c7722a45.jpg

This painting may be understood as a sort of programmatic statement and resume of Friedrich's aims and intentions. A source of inspiration for the painting was the polar expedition mounted by William Edward Parry from 1819 to 1820 in search of the North-west Passage. The painting's icy palette corresponds to the Arctic setting. It is undoubtedly one of the artist's masterpieces, yet the radical nature of its composition and subject was greeted in its own day with incomprehension and rejection. The picture remained unsold right up to Friedrich's death in 1840.

In the painting, now often called The Wreck of the Hope, the painter imbued the subject with unsurpassable dramatic intensity. The particular feature of this work is that the drama has already happened. The huge towering pinnacles are the slowly moving icebergs that have long become fixed here. The bold attempt by man to burst the bounds of his allotted sphere ends in death.

When the artist was 13, an accident occurred, that, perhaps subconsciously, formed part of the shadow that seemed to darken his temperament throughout his life. While ice skating he was saved from drowning by his younger brother Christoph, but Christoph himself drowned in the icy water before his eyes. It can be hardly denied that Friedrich's various "sea of ice" paintings must be seen in relation to this traumatic experience.
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Man and Woman Contemplating the Moon - c. 1824
oil on canvas

http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b184/eydi/613ea896.jpg

Friedrich only rarely incorporated aspects of his own life in his painting, but where he did, the statement loses nothing of his objective force. After his marriage to Carline Bommer in 1818, he produced paintings that include the figure of a woman. In the Man and Woman Looking at the Moon Friedrich has portrayed himself and his wife gazing at the moon in Romantic wonderment. This painting is probably one of the most ardent acknowledgements of their relationship. There is a variant on the motif, Two Men Looking at the Moon (Dresden), painted in c. 1820.
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Evening - c. 1824
oil on canvas

http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b184/eydi/d1856820.jpg

English influences, from Constable (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Constable) or others working in a similar vein, may account for Friedrich's interest in cloud studies, as evidenced by this painting, a small oil study on cardboard which is highly innovative, almost avant-garde in character.
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Rocky Reef on the Sea Shore - c. 1824
oil on canvas

http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b184/eydi/718f72f9.jpg

This painting is closely related to The Sea of Ice (Kunsthalle, Hamburg) and it was probably executed only shortly afterwards. It probably depicts the western tip of the Isle of Wight (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isle_of_Wight) off Bournemouth, a view which Friedrich may have known from engravings. The rocky needles in the sea recall the ice formations in the Hamburg painting.
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The Cemetery Entrance - 1825
oil on canvas

http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b184/eydi/9d9b9eb0.jpg

When Friedrich resumed working in oil following the provisional end of his illness, there lingered a dark shadow which also afflicted his private life - a forewarning of the stroke he would later suffer and which would hasten his death. The motif of the graveyard now began to appear with greater frequency in his oeuvre, as for example in the painting The Cemetery Entrance, which was probably commenced in 1825 but which remained unfinished. The imposing gateway is based on that of the Trinitatis (http://www.dresden-reisefuehrer.de/dd/o_trinitatki.htm) cemetery in Dresden.
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The Watzmann - 1824/25
oil on canvas

http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b184/eydi/ed227485.jpg

Throughout his life, Friedrich demonstrated himself to be closely attached to his home. His numerous trips and walking tours to central Germany, Silesia, Bohemia, Greifswald, Neubrandenburg and Rügen never actually took him very far away. He never visited southern Germany, for example, and his painting of The Watzmann (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Watzmann) - a mountain near Berchtesgaden (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berchtesgadener_Land), portrayed here rising like a Gothic cathedral in it's stone majesty - was inspired by a watercolour by his pupil August Heinrich. It also rivalled a painting (http://www.artrenewal.org/asp/database/image.asp?id=26376) by Adrian Ludwig Richter (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adrian_Ludwig_Richter)of the same title, which went on show in Dresden in 1824 and was intended to back up Richter's application for the professorship in landscape painting at the Academy, the post to which Friedrich also aspired.

Despite its apparent fidelity to nature, the painting reveals a somewhat fantastical element in its mixture of different geological formations and its unnatural ratios of scale.
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The Oaktree in the Snow - 1829
oil on canvas

http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b184/eydi/e01b9ac9.jpg

Friedrich was preoccupied by the passage of time. The ages of man are mirrored by the seasonal cycle, and his vivid representations of winter snow and leafless trees contain the promise of spring growth, as in The Oak Tree in the Snow, which is both an image of striking naturalism and a complex allegory, painted late in Friedrich's life in a mood of retrospection. The German oak, a symbol of strength, is cruelly chopped and denuded, like Germany itself for much of the painter's life; its dead branches speak of a lost past. Yet at its roots spring new leaves, and the blue sky, reflected in the icy water, brings hope of renewal. This picture needs no figures, for the oak is really a collective figure of the German people.

Oak trees run like a leitmotif throughout Friedrich's oeuvre, often in conjunction with a dolmen. They are a reminder of the artist's personal roots and are at the same time charged with nationalist sentiment.
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Evening Landscape with Two Men; also known as - 1830/35
oil on canvas

http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b184/eydi/4718091b.jpg
After his marriage in 1818 people assume a more prominent role in Friedrich's pictures and become considerably larger. Figures also appear more frequently in pairs closely bound by friendship or love, etching themselves forever on the memory in images of supreme potency, such as Evening Landscape with Two Men.
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The Riesengebirge - 1830/35
oil on canvas

http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b184/eydi/b5aeef7d.jpg

For Friedrich, the liberation of his country presaged a period of happy stability, in which he was elected to the Dresden Academy in 1816 and married two years later. The removal of the stimulus of patriotic resistance rather diminished Friedrich's symbolic rigour. He developed a broader handling of paint, and made a number of studies of clouds and natural phenomena. The change of interpretation and technique can be clearly seen in this painting.

With his friend Kersting he had made a tour of the mountainous area near Dresden known as 'Saxon Switzerland' (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saxon_Switzerland) (Sächsische Schweiz), in the summer of 1810. Morning in the Riesengebirge, painted shortly afterwards, is another exposition of his theme of the cross on a peak. In this later picture of the early 1830s, Friedrich recollected his mountain tour in terms of pure landscape, with only a shepherd to inhabit it; the zones of earth and heaven are harmonized by the melding vapour of morning mist.
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The Grosse Gehege Near Dresden - c. 1832
oil on canvas

http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b184/eydi/20aff80d.jpg

This painting, depicting an area of pastureland crossed by tree-lined avenues just outside Dresden, portrayed in masterly fashion from an alienating angle, is an example of Friedrich's final phase of full mastery. He uses an exquisite palette to evoke a particularly solemn evening mood and thereby lends a rhythmic impulse to the foreground with rivulets of water glinting in the sunset.

With the richness of its palette, the beauty of its composition and its sonorous atmosphere, this impressive painting is a true masterpiece in the history of European landscape painting.
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Neubrandenburg in Flames (Sunrise near Neubrandenburg) - c. 1835
oil on canvas

http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b184/eydi/684b6331.jpg

Clouds of smoke are billowing from windows and from the roof of the Marienkirche (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Marienkirche&redirect=no), part of which is missing. Flames even appear to be leaping from one of the windows. There are no records to say that this was an actual fire that Friedrich might have witnessed, however.

*[B]note: this particular painting seems to deviate somewhat from Friedrich's typical style... atleast for me, it rather evokes a sort of "impressionistic" feel in technique. Nonetheless, it's still quite a lovely composition and color palette; especially the thick usage of tobacco browns, contrasting against vivid pastels of the sun-stained sky.
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Wreck in the Moonlight - c. 1835
oil on canvas

http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b184/eydi/5586b5db.jpg

In Friedrich's last oil paintings, such as the Wreck in the Moonlight and The Riesengebirge (both in the Nationalgalerie (http://www.smb.spk-berlin.de/smb/de/sammlungen/details.php?objectId=17), Berlin), executed before he suffered a stroke on 26 June 1835 that left him partially paralysed in the arms and legs, around 1835, condense motifs typical of Friedrich into definitive statements which etch themselves indelibly upon the memory with their inner grandeur, their solemnity and their formal sovereignty.
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"The pure, frank sentiments we hold in our hearts are the only truthful sources of art. A painting which does not take its inspiration from the heart is nothing more than futile juggling. All authentic art is conceived at a sacred moment and nourished in a blessed hour; an inner impulse creates it, often without the artist being aware of it." - C.D. Friedrich
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For more information, links, and image directories, please visit Artcyclopedia's Caspar David Friedrich page (http://www.artcyclopedia.com/artists/friedrich_caspar_david.html).

Blutwölfin
Wednesday, January 4th, 2006, 08:36 AM
Friedrich, one of my favourites (http://www.forums.skadi.net/showpost.php?p=112592&postcount=5).

newenstad
Wednesday, January 4th, 2006, 02:57 PM
The Wanderer above the mists (http://www.wga.hu/frames-e.html?/html/f/friedric/2/209fried.html) accompanied by Franz Schubert's Wanderer Fantasy

"Der Wanderer über dem Nebelmeer" and German Romanticism had been part of my A-levels...:speechles

Rheinwächter
Thursday, June 15th, 2006, 06:50 PM
Finally, two other nice ones of my favorite artist.