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View Full Version : Anglo-Saxons As A Racial Sub-Type



Hardwig
Friday, November 25th, 2005, 09:36 PM
The term Anglo-Saxon refers to the Northern German tribes Anglos and Saxons,but some people like to use this term to name an Europid phenotype,ex:"Oh,this girl looks Anglo-Saxon".In the way that I see this incorrect.When you take the table of "subraces" (phenotypes) of Germany for example you will find that the predominate types in the northern part of that country is Borreby and Falish,so the so called Anglo-Saxon should be a mix of these two types and not other completely different.The existence of these two types in the next regions like Denmark is a prove that in northern Germany these types must be very common since long time ago too.What I'm trying to say is: since these two types (Borreby and Falish) predominate there (Northern Germany) from many Centuries ago,how can the "Anglo-Saxon" type have a different physical appearance from both Borreby and Falish? Is it an inexactness from especialists or I'm just going crazy?

dehook
Friday, November 25th, 2005, 10:03 PM
The term "Anglo-Saxon" in an anthropological context means a stabilized blend of Brunn and Nordic. Falish means a stabilized blend of Borreby and Nordic. Go to www.nordish.com (http://www.nordish.com) for more information on these types.

Glenlivet
Friday, November 25th, 2005, 11:01 PM
That is some sort of interpretation. It is problematic because the anthropologists who used Fälid did not have Borreby in their scheme and those who had Borreby did not have Fälid (Kaj Birket-Smith is an exception who did write about both "Ice Age races", but he was more an ethnologist who based his anthropology sections on other works before him).

The chapters "The Germanic Peoples", "The Netherlands and Frisia" and "Germany", give cluses as to what Coon in The Races of Europe meant with Anglo-Saxon.

"At the beginning of the local Iron Age, a new people, bearing a Hallstatt type of culture, entered northwestern Germany and Scandinavia. These invaders were of the usual central European Nordic type associated in earlier centuries with the Illyrians. Through mixture with the local blend of Megalithic, Corded, and Borreby elements, these newcomers gave rise to a special sub-type of Nordic which was characterized by a larger vault and face, a heavier body build, and a skull form on the borderline between dolicho- and mesocephaly." (CS Coon on "The Germanic Peoples")

"Metrically and morphologically, the Frisians belong for the most part to a well-marked type, which is very Nordic in the usual sense of the word, but which, in the sense employed in this book, is something different. The Germanic Nordic element is without doubt strong, but the excessive size of head and face, and particularly the facial breadths, make it clear that the old Upper Palaeolithic elements, Brünn as well as Borreby, have been incorporated in quantity. In view of the great facial lengths and the ruggedness and angularity of the facial profile typical of Frisians, and of their spare body build, one is led to postulate an excess of Corded factors as well." (CS Coon on "The Netherlands and Frisia")

"The Germanic Nordic type which occupied this southern area, and which was well exemplified by the Anglo-Saxons and Frisians, was a combination of ordinary Iron Age Nordics with Brünn and Borreby elements, and with a larger ratio of Corded than the original Nordic formula required. It was a heavier, coarser type than the Nordic which took root in eastern Norway and in central Sweden, but perhaps not at that time quite as much so as that which developed in Western Norway, and which it most closely resembled. We have already studied its closest living representatives in both England and Frisia." (CS Coon on "Germany")


The term "Anglo-Saxon" in an anthropological context means a stabilized blend of Brunn and Nordic. Falish means a stabilized blend of Borreby and Nordic. Go to www.nordish.com for more information on these types.

Hardwig
Monday, November 28th, 2005, 06:07 AM
"At the beginning of the local Iron Age, a new people, bearing a Hallstatt type of culture, entered northwestern Germany and Scandinavia. These invaders were of the usual central European Nordic type associated in earlier centuries with the Illyrians. Through mixture with the local blend of Megalithic, Corded, and Borreby elements, these newcomers gave rise to a special sub-type of Nordic which was characterized by a larger vault and face, a heavier body build, and a skull form on the borderline between dolicho- and mesocephaly." (CS Coon on "The Germanic Peoples")Why the Hallstatt type still relatively pure in Scandinavia but not in Germany and Holland (Frisia)? And why do they make up more of Scandinavian population (much more) than German and Dutch ones,since they arrived in these three places at the same time?