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Scáthach
Monday, September 1st, 2003, 10:46 PM
exactly what it seems...


Martin Amis - The Information

Garrison Keillor - Lake Wobegon Summer 1956

Thomas More - Utopia

Benjamin Disraeli - The Two Nations

Ewergrin
Tuesday, September 2nd, 2003, 03:36 AM
Slaughterhouse 5 for the umpteenth time.

Nordgau
Tuesday, September 2nd, 2003, 12:59 PM
Currently reading:

Bernhard Kummer: Midgards Untergang [The Fall of Midgard]. A book from the twenties on the faith and religion of the Germanics. It's a scientific book (it was in fact Kummer's doctoral thesis), but written with respect to the Germanics and tries to find out real the spirit of their religious feeling through the sources.

Stigmatisiert. Der Terror der Gutmenschen [Stigmatized. The Terror of the "Good People"]. Describes and analyzes the moralic terror of the left-liberal media and politics against such who are stigmatized as "right wingers" through several single campaigns (Waldheim, Filbinger, Ernst Nolte etc.). An excellent analysis of the political correct mechanisms of this society.

Phlegethon
Tuesday, September 2nd, 2003, 03:02 PM
Seymour Martin Lipset / Gary Marks: It Did Not Happen Here. Why Socialism Failed in the United States

xïa
Thursday, October 9th, 2003, 02:28 AM
Her story by Simone Berteaut.

Jack
Thursday, October 9th, 2003, 08:31 AM
Selections from the Prison Notebooks - Antonio Gramsci

Frans_Jozef
Thursday, October 9th, 2003, 03:06 PM
*Felix Keiter, Rasse und Kultur.III.Band: Hochkultur und Rasse.

*Catherine Horel, Histoire de Budapest.

*Alice Nahon, Schaduw.

Nordgau
Thursday, October 9th, 2003, 10:42 PM
Günther Gründel: Die Sendung der jungen Generation. Versuch einer umfassenden revolutionären Sinndeutung der Krise

David Irving: Goebbels. Macht und Magie

Jack
Wednesday, December 3rd, 2003, 11:30 AM
Human Action - Ludwig Von Mises
Prussianism and Socialism - Oswald Spengler
Ego and Archetype - Edward F. Edinger
For a New Liberty - The Libetarian Manifesto - Murray Rothbard

Scáthach
Friday, December 5th, 2003, 05:39 PM
Nicholas Mosley - ''Accident''

Sean O Casey - ''The Plough and the Stars''

R.M Punnett - ''British Government and Politics''

Michael Argyle - ''Psychology and Social Problems''

Allenson
Friday, December 5th, 2003, 07:18 PM
Race and Human Evolution by Milford Wolpoff and Rachel Caspari - 1996.

What else? ;-)

It's a good work that deals with the Multiregional view of human evolution as opposed to the "Out of Africa" model.

Frans_Jozef
Friday, December 5th, 2003, 07:32 PM
Race and Human Evolution by Milford Wolpoff and Rachel Caspari - 1996.

What else? ;-)

It's a good work that deals with the Multiregional view of human evolution as opposed to the "Out of Africa" model.


Excellent, in this case I can leave you to make some summaries and publish some excerpts from this intriguing but not too accessible book, while meanwhile I can fully concentrate on the theories of W. and E.R. Jaensch...;-))

Allenson
Friday, December 5th, 2003, 08:13 PM
Excellent, in this case I can leave you to make some summaries and publish some excerpts from this intriguing but not too accessible book, while meanwhile I can fully concentrate on the theories of W. and E.R. Jaensch...;-))


Do I remember you refering to this book on one of your posts, Frans? I have this thought in my head anyway....

I was thinking of scanning some of the skull images from this book and yes, summarizing some of the main points. I'm just getting to the 'juicy' parts now. He-he.

It contains some excellent Coon quotes as well that I thought I'd post also.

Ederico
Saturday, December 6th, 2003, 08:37 PM
The Twilight Of The Idols - Friedrich Nietzsche
Socialism: Utopian And Scientific - Frederick Engels

NormanBlood
Tuesday, December 9th, 2003, 07:03 PM
Enemy of God by Bernard Cornwell. Its an Arthurian novel:D

FadeTheButcher
Friday, December 12th, 2003, 10:57 PM
Julian the Apostate (1978)
by G.W. Bowersock

The Protestant Ethic Debate, Max Weber's Replies to his Critics, 1907-1910 (2001)
Edited by David J. Chalcraft and Austin Harrington

The Reign of Charles V (2002)
by William Maltby

The Cambridge Companion to Modern French Culture (2003)
Edited by Nicholas Hewitt

Russia: Experiment with a People (2003)
by Robert Service

friedrich braun
Saturday, December 13th, 2003, 08:28 AM
Hi Fade,

I'm glad to see that you're reading about Julian the Apostate.

I highly recommend Gore Vidal novel's about him, I read it a few years ago and enjoyed it tremendously.

"Julian has always been something of an underground hero in Europe. His attempt to stop Christianity and revive Hellenism exerts still a romantic appeal."
Gore Vidal's Julian

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0345329082/104-1355969-8679957?v=glance

Julian the Apostate is a fascinationg historic personage, and perhaps my favourite historic figure.

A good site on Julian

http://www.juliansociety.org/

Not long ago I bought Richard Fletcher's The Barbarian Conversion: From Paganism to Christianity.

It ought to be a lot of fun -- I can't wait to read it.


Julian the Apostate (1978)
by G.W. Bowersock

The Protestant Ethic Debate, Max Weber's Replies to his Critics, 1907-1910 (2001)
Edited by David J. Chalcraft and Austin Harrington

The Reign of Charles V (2002)
by William Maltby

The Cambridge Companion to Modern French Culture (2003)
Edited by Nicholas Hewitt

Russia: Experiment with a People (2003)
by Robert Service

Nordgau
Saturday, December 13th, 2003, 01:58 PM
Hi Fade,

I'm glad to see that you're reading about Julian the Apostate.


Apart from biographies on Iulianus, I've got a book with quotes of him: Der Kaiser der Römer gegen den König der Juden ("The Emperor of the Romans Against the King of the Jews"), printed in the early 1940s in the Nordland-Verlag, the publishing house which belonged to the SS. :D

FadeTheButcher
Sunday, December 14th, 2003, 02:28 AM
The interesting thing about Julian, is that unlike most other pagans, except perhaps Marcus Aurelius whom he admired, he was a pious ascetic. His paganism was more of an expression of his own austere personality than anything else. He quarreled with many of the other pagans like the Cynics because of this. He tried to change paganism to counter Christianity. He certainly was no decadent. He also wanted to establish a pagan church and adopt other Christian motifs.

"'Do we not observe,' Julian asked the high priest of Galatia, 'that what has most of all fostered the growth of atheism (i.e. Christianity) is humanity towards strangers, forethought in regard to the burial of the dead, and an affection of dignity in one's life? Each of these ought, in my opinion, to be cultivated genuinely by us.' Julian went on to instruct that his priests avoid theatres, taverns, and any occupations of ill-repute. He ordered that guest houses be established in every city to give proof of the humanity of the pagan priests. He provided for the free distribution of wheat and wine to the poor. The friends of Hellenism were to undertake this philanthropy and to wrest from the Galilaeans the credit they had earned from good works."

G.W. Bowersock, Julian the Apostate (Cambridge, 1978), p.87

Julian was a great emperor. He reminds me of Hitler in the way that he undertook a great project of spiritual reform yet was cut down so early in his life. He lived a pious upright life as well. The man was uncorruptable. Truly a shining light in the darkness of the late empire no doubt. There is, however, his attempt to rebuild the temple of the Jews in Jerusalem. He tried to cultivate the Jews as allies, but this was probably due to political, rather than religious motives.

FadeTheButcher
Sunday, December 14th, 2003, 02:46 AM
I finished up reading Julian the Apostate and The Reign of Charles V today. I got some more books today, a new bio on Julius Caesar and two other books I have checked out previously but did not finish reading.

Otto III (2003)
by Gerd Althoff, Phyllis G. Jestice (Translator)

Charlemagne (2003)
by Matthias Becher, David S. Bachrach (Translator)

Julius Caesar: Man, Soldier, and Tyrant
by J. F. C. Fuller

FadeTheButcher
Monday, December 15th, 2003, 05:35 PM
Bought some new books yesterday:

The Barbarian Conversion: From Paganism to Christianity (1997)
by Richard Fletcher

Nietzsche, Volumes One and Two, The Will to Power as Art and Eternal Return of the Same
by Martin Heidegger and translated by David Farrell Krell

Nietzsche, Volumes Three and Four, The Will to Power as Knowledge and Nihilism
by Martin Heidegger and translated by David Farrell Krell

The Renaissance
by Paul Johnson (finally found this one)

The Wittgenstein Reader
Edited by Anthony Kenny

Thanks for the recommendation friedrich braun. I have read about 70 pages into The Barbarian Conversion so far. I found this interesting in particular:

"'Throughout the whole period of the Roman empire not a single example is known of a man who was appointed bishop with the specific task of going beyond the frontier to a wholly pagan region in order to convert the barbarians living there.'"

Richard Fletcher, The Barbarian Conversion: From Paganism to Christianity (Los Angeles, 1997), p.25

Julius
Monday, December 15th, 2003, 10:03 PM
The movement that was condemned unheard (Rörelsen som dömdes ohörd) - "Wiking Jerk"

http://www.nordiskaforlaget.com/_upload/rorelsen_stor.gif

A new book written by a nationalist about the history of the major Swedish national socialist party 1933-1950.

Laedifox
Tuesday, December 16th, 2003, 12:19 AM
Dune, by Frank Herbert.

once I'm finished that one:
Les misérables, by Victor Hugo, in the original French.
Foucault's Pendulum, by Umberto Eco, in the English translation.

friedrich braun
Tuesday, December 16th, 2003, 01:33 AM
Dune, by Frank Herbert.

once I'm finished that one:
Les misérables, by Victor Hugo, in the original French.
Foucault's Pendulum, by Umberto Eco, in the English translation.

I love Umberto Eco and Foucault's Pendulum is a perennial favourite -- lots of wacky, conspiratorial fun!

friedrich braun
Tuesday, December 16th, 2003, 01:48 AM
You're more than welcome, Fade.

All that Nietzsche...now I know why I like you so much...we're drinking at the same source...hehehe....

My discovery of Nietzsche in my early twenties has been of monumental importance to my life and world-view. I never feel as much exhilirating joy as when I read the great Saxon.

I've got all of his works at home.

"You say it is the good cause that hallows even war? I say unto you: it is the good war that hallows any cause. War and courage have accomplished more great things than love of the neighbor."

Werde wer du bist! ["Become who you are!"]






Bought some new books yesterday:

The Barbarian Conversion: From Paganism to Christianity (1997)
by Richard Fletcher

Nietzsche, Volumes One and Two, The Will to Power as Art and Eternal Return of the Same
by Martin Heidegger and translated by David Farrell Krell

Nietzsche, Volumes Three and Four, The Will to Power as Knowledge and Nihilism
by Martin Heidegger and translated by David Farrell Krell

The Renaissance
by Paul Johnson (finally found this one)

The Wittgenstein Reader
Edited by Anthony Kenny

Thanks for the recommendation friedrich braun. I have read about 70 pages into The Barbarian Conversion so far. I found this interesting in particular:

"'Throughout the whole period of the Roman empire not a single example is known of a man who was appointed bishop with the specific task of going beyond the frontier to a wholly pagan region in order to convert the barbarians living there.'"

Richard Fletcher, The Barbarian Conversion: From Paganism to Christianity (Los Angeles, 1997), p.25

FadeTheButcher
Wednesday, December 17th, 2003, 11:30 PM
Sparkling new additions to my library:

Stepping Stones to Nowhere: The Aleutian Islands, Alaska, and American Military Strategy, 1867-1945 (2003)
By Galen Roger Perras

Calculating the Value of the Union: Slavery, Property Rights, and the Economic Origins of the Civil War (2003)
By James L. Huston

Over the Edge of the World: Magellan’s Terrifying Circumnavigation of the Globe (2003)
By Laurence Bergreen

The Winter King: Frederick V of the Palantine and the Coming of the Thirty Years’ War (2003)
By Brennan C. Pursell

The Great Confrontation: Europe and Islam Through the Centuries (2003)
By Ilya V. Gaiduk

Mohammed and Charlemagne (1955)
By Henri Pirenne

A Dangerous Mind: Carl Schmitt in Post-War European Thought (2003)
By Jan-Werner Mueller

The Illusion of Victory: America in World War I (2003)
By Thomas Fleming

Nordgau
Friday, December 19th, 2003, 07:13 PM
Just finished reading:

Siegfried Kadner, Rasse und Humor [Race and Humour], Berlin 1936.

Contents: Plant, Animal and Man / Tension and Relaxion / Comic and Humour / Culture, Style and Race / The Nordic Style / The Falish Humour / Mediterranean Comic / Dinaric "Hamur" / Alpine Serenity / Conflicting Character of East Baltic Laughter / Hither Asian / Jewish cynism / Negro and Negrification / Mixed forms

http://www.shw-computer.de/hts/grafiken/smilies/pepsi.gif

friedrich braun
Sunday, December 21st, 2003, 07:31 AM
John Keegan's history of WW II.

I just bought "Histoire des réligions" [History of religion] in 6 volumes.

AngryPotato
Saturday, January 17th, 2004, 06:41 AM
I had to quit reading Deceived, Damned, & Defiant by David Lane. Going into the book I had a tremendous respect for Mr Lane just for starting the 14 Words. After reading through about 2/3rds of the book I had to stop. Mr Lane seems to be a conspiracy nut. WW2 was started by the jews in order to secure Israel? We should all rape white women to increase our population? The second question/statement caused me to stop reading. If anyone thinks I should continue on let me know.

Right now I started reading an easy book:
Fight Club by Chuck Palahniuk
Its a quick and easy read and I should be done by the end of the weekend.

I don't know if I will be tackling Decline and Falll of the Roman Empire or if I will blow through Fields of Fire by James Webb first.

Scoob
Saturday, January 17th, 2004, 10:54 AM
Morning of the Magicians - Louis Pauwels & Jacque Bergier
Shamanism - Mircea Eliade
Introducing Nietzsche

And --- Nietzche was Saxon? He was from a Polish (Slavic) family.

Sigrun Christianson
Saturday, January 17th, 2004, 04:51 PM
I had to quit reading Deceived, Damned, & Defiant by David Lane. Going into the book I had a tremendous respect for Mr Lane just for starting the 14 Words. After reading through about 2/3rds of the book I had to stop. Mr Lane seems to be a conspiracy nut. WW2 was started by the jews in order to secure Israel? We should all rape white women to increase our population? The second question/statement caused me to stop reading. If anyone thinks I should continue on let me know.
Ha-ha-ha! :rofl I did exactly the same thing when I tried to read it years ago. I get so much sh!t from all over the "movement" for calling David Lane a nutcase. I only managed to get through about 1/3 before I put it away. Maybe I'll use it for the fire.

Sigrun Christianson
Saturday, January 17th, 2004, 04:59 PM
...currently reading The Vikings, revised addition, by Else Roesdahl, for the umpteenth time.

Latest additions:
Celtic and Old Norse Designs by Courtney Davis
Ancient Scandinavian Designs by Bev Ulsrud Van Berkom
Viking Designs by A. G. Smith

These are all just picture books for some upcoming needlework projects. I'm going to transfer some of these designs onto tapestry & needlepoint canvas.

The Friends of the Library is having their bi-annual sale next week. :D

Milesian
Saturday, January 17th, 2004, 05:25 PM
The Path to Freedom - Michael Collins
Inside the Brotherhood - Martin Short
Kingdoms of the Celts - John King

Nordgau
Monday, January 19th, 2004, 04:55 PM
And --- Nietzche was Saxon? He was from a Polish (Slavic) family.

Well, at the best he was of partly Polish descend - but even that seems not to be true:

http://www.friedrichnietzsche.de/index.php?REM_sessid=&action=21

"Die Familienlegende von der polnischen Herkunft seiner väterlichen Vorfahren, die er öfter erwähnt, hat sich als unhaltbar erwiesen, (...) Die bis jetzt festgestellten Vorfahren Nietzsches gehören in Ihrer überwiegenden Mehrzahl dem Bürgertum kleinerer Städte (Handwerker, Gewerbetreibende, Beamte) und dem Landpfarrerstande an. Das Bauertum ist nur schwach vertreten.(...) Betreffs der landschaftlichen Herkunft bietet die Ahnentafel ein sehr geschlossenes Bild. Mit ganz wenigen Ausnahmen stammen die Vorfahren Nietzsches aus dem engen Raum, der begrenzt wird durch die Orte Langensalza, Sangerhausen, Eisleben, Eilenburg, Zwickau, Plauen (Vogtld.), Saalburg (westl. Plauen), Stadtilm (südl. Weimar); dazu das von der Ostgrenze dieses Raumes ca. 120 km östlich liegende Burgau i.d. Oberlausitz(...)."

Translation: "The family legend of the Polish origin of his paternal anestors which he mentioned sometimes, has turned out to be untendable, (...) The ancestors of Nietzsche who have been found out until now belong in their predominating majority to the middle classes of smaller towns (craftsmen, traders, officials) and to the rank of rural priests. Peasants are only few appearing. (...) In respect to the regional origin, the genealogical table gives a very closed image: With very few exceptions the ancestors of Nietzsche come from a narrow space of which the boundarary is formed of the places Langensalza, Sangerhausen, Eisleben, Eilenburg, Zwickau, Plauen (Vogtland), Saalburg (west of Plauen), Stadtilm (south of Weimar); in addition to it Burgau in the Upper Lausitz which lies 120 km east of the eastern border of this space (...)."

One can also order Nietzsche's genealogical table here:
http://www.lebensbuch.com/books5.htm

Scoob
Monday, January 19th, 2004, 06:58 PM
Well, at the best he was of partly Polish descend - but even that seems not to be true:

http://www.friedrichnietzsche.de/index.php?REM_sessid=&action=21

Translation: "The family legend of the Polish origin of his paternal anestors which he mentioned sometimes, has turned out to be untendable, (...) The ancestors of Nietzsche who have been found out until now belong in their predominating majority to the middle classes of smaller towns (craftsmen, traders, officials) and to the rank of rural priests. Peasants are only few appearing. (...) In respect to the regional origin, the genealogical table gives a very closed image: With very few exceptions the ancestors of Nietzsche come from a narrow space of which the boundarary is formed of the places Langensalza, Sangerhausen, Eisleben, Eilenburg, Zwickau, Plauen (Vogtland), Saalburg (west of Plauen), Stadtilm (south of Weimar); in addition to it Burgau in the Upper Lausitz which lies 120 km east of the eastern border of this space (...)."

One can also order Nietzsche's genealogical table here:
http://www.lebensbuch.com/books5.htm

Interesting. But the surname "Nietzsche" sounds like Germanicized Slavic to me, although that's just my lay observation.

Anyway, I've been reading some of his stuff for the second time in my life recently, and he's a very refreshing and insightful guy at times.

friedrich braun
Monday, January 19th, 2004, 08:11 PM
Nietzsche manufactured a (Noble Protestant) Polish background for himself.

At least one of his biographers (Curt Paul Janz) in his two-volume biography states that he looked extensively into Nietzsche's genealogy and didn't find traces of Polish descent.

Now, the question remains why he (and members of his family) engaged in just a delusional scheme, i.e., why did they think that they were of partly Polish descent?

Scoob
Monday, January 19th, 2004, 09:04 PM
Nietzsche manufactured a (Noble Protestant) Polish background for himself.

At least one of his biographers (Curt Paul Janz) in his two-volume biography states that he looked extensively into Nietzsche's genealogy and didn't find traces of Polish descent.

Now, the question remains why he (and members of his family) engaged in just a delusional scheme, i.e., why did they think that they were of partly Polish descent?

Possibly because Nietzsche was a social misfit. He had a lot of negative things to say about Germans and German society. That's my best guess.

I don't know too much about German attitudes toward Poland and the Polish in the mid 19th century, so I can't say more than that.

Did the Nietzsche family also believe this myth? Lots of people claim descent from royalty in the USA. Whether it's real or imagined, it's a common phenomenon.

Or maybe they really did have some kind of Slavic ancestry. There were Slavic groups who got assimilated to Germany. The Wends come to mind. The name Nietzsche does not sound German at all to me. The biographer might be wrong.

Mac Seafraidh
Tuesday, January 20th, 2004, 07:25 AM
I am going out of subject here and a lot of Nords will not be interested, but some might. I know not all the Nords on this site are anti-Med., but I was cleaning my room somewhat and I found a book and I forgot I even had it. The book is called "Italians First" by ??? Barone(forgot the first name LOL) It lists and describes all the inventions Italians came up with. Alexander Graham Bell did not actually invent the telephone. It was the Italian's idea. The book is loaded with innovations. I recommend it to anyone who is interested.

Julius
Tuesday, January 20th, 2004, 10:39 AM
The Enemy of Europe (The Enemy of Our Enemies) - Francis Parker Yockey (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/094209400X/qid=1074595033//ref=sr_8_xs_ap_i0_xgl14/103-8734360-1144605?v=glance&s=books&n=507846)

Yes, I finally bought the latest Library Bell 2003 edition - in a Swedish book store(!).

Phlegethon
Tuesday, January 20th, 2004, 03:38 PM
Liberty Bell?

Nordgau
Tuesday, January 20th, 2004, 03:52 PM
Possibly because Nietzsche was a social misfit. He had a lot of negative things to say about Germans and German society. That's my best guess.

I don't know too much about German attitudes toward Poland and the Polish in the mid 19th century, so I can't say more than that.

Did the Nietzsche family also believe this myth? Lots of people claim descent from royalty in the USA. Whether it's real or imagined, it's a common phenomenon.

Or maybe they really did have some kind of Slavic ancestry. There were Slavic groups who got assimilated to Germany. The Wends come to mind. The name Nietzsche does not sound German at all to me. The biographer might be wrong.

It's no secret that Nietzsche had a certain aversion to the type of the contented bourgeois of Imperial Germany and stressed his European "cosmopolitanism". He didn't like the bourgeois society of his era. I reread yesterday the part in "Ecce Homo" where he says approximately: "I'm even more German than these average German citizens", and then goes over to his supposed ancestors of Polish nobility.

The surname "Nietzsche" is an East-Middle German (Thuringia, [Upper] Saxony, Silesia) derivation of the first name "Nikolaus". The letter order "tz-sch" doesn't appear in High German, but is characteristic for some person and place names here. East of Saale there were indeed Slavic groups integrated and absorbed during respectively then with the time after the German Medieval eastern settlement. He maybe has not only German, but also Wendish ancestors if one would go back to Middle Ages.
Maybe in later times also one ancestrial line leads to some Slavic ancestor of the Wendish group in the Lausitz which was as bigger area only little touched by German settlement and remained as Slavic group until today. However, as far as I see, these are not more than speculations.

Laedifox
Friday, January 23rd, 2004, 05:47 PM
I just started reading Timeline by Michael Crichton. Fabulous "historical science fiction" novel, science fiction since it uses a technology that hasn't been invented, historical because said technology catapults the stars back to medieval times.

Read the book. Don't see the movie, I heard it sucked.

Ominous Lord Spoonblade
Saturday, January 24th, 2004, 11:27 PM
Invisible Monsters (http://www.wwnorton.com/catalog/fall99/invisible.htm) -Chuck Palahnuik

Evolved
Sunday, January 25th, 2004, 07:41 AM
This is what I'm reading:


Nature's Secrets Revealed
SCIENTIFIC KNOWLEDGE OF
The Laws of Sex Life and Heredity
or
EUGENICS

Vital Information for the Married and Marriageable of All Ages;
a Word at the Right Time to the Boy, Girl, Young Man,
Young Woman, Husband, Wife, Father and Mother;
Also Timely Help, Counsel and Instruction
for Every Member of the Home

----

TOGETHER WITH IMPORTANT HINTS ON

SOCIAL PURITY, HEREDITY,
PHYSICAL MANHOOD AND WOMANHOOD
BY NOTED SPECIALISTS

Embracing a Department on Ethics of the Unmarried
by
PROFESSOR T.W. SHANNON, A.M.
International Lecturer; Editor Eugenics Department, Uplift Magazine; President Single Standard Eugenic Movement; Author of Self-Knowledge, Perfect Manhood, Perfect Womanhood, Heredity Explained, Guide to Sex Instruction, etc.
----
INTRODUCED BY

BISHOP SAMUEL FALLOWS, D.D., L.L.D.
----
MEDICAL DEPARTMENT BY
W.J. TRUITT, M.D.
Formerly Associate Professor of Obstetrics, National Medical College, Chicago,
Assisted by Celebrated Specialists
----
PROFUSELY ILLUSTRATED
----
PUBLISHED BY
THE S.A. MULLIKIN COMPANY
MULLIKIN BUILDING
MARIETTA, - - - - OHIO
1917

Ominous Lord Spoonblade
Sunday, January 25th, 2004, 09:46 AM
"SOCIAL PURITY" :scratch :sick

Evolved
Sunday, January 25th, 2004, 10:05 AM
Yeah, you even came to mind as I was typing that part.. :evil :rofl

Ominous Lord Spoonblade
Sunday, January 25th, 2004, 10:12 AM
Yeah, you even came to mind as I was typing that part.. :evil :rofl


Well, I do believe the body is a temple :halo Society should reflect this :pope

Ewergrin
Monday, February 23rd, 2004, 01:13 AM
What book are you currently reading?

Right now I am on chapter six of To Have and Have Not by Ernest Hemingway.

http://www.blutundboden.com/forum/images/tohaveandhavenot.jpg

PsycholgclMishap
Monday, February 23rd, 2004, 03:02 AM
I'm currently reading:
Leo Tolstoy's "War and Peace"
Pablo Neruda's "Residencia en la Tierra (Residence on Earth)"

I started and finished reading the following today:
Peter G. Helmkamp's "The Conqueror Manifesto"
Peter G. Helmkamp's "Controlled Burn"

Anonymous
Monday, February 23rd, 2004, 03:19 AM
American Psycho, Bret Easton Ellis
Blind Date, Jerzy Kosinski
and some short stories by Franz Kafka here and there

PsycholgclMishap
Monday, February 23rd, 2004, 04:09 AM
Blind Date, Jerzy Kosinski

How is this book? A little insight?

Jack
Monday, February 23rd, 2004, 06:53 AM
Currently reading:

Revolt Against the Modern World - Julius Evola
Crime and Punishment - Fyodor Dostoyevsky.

Ewergrin
Sunday, March 7th, 2004, 07:58 PM
The Torrents of Spring by Ernest Hemingway

http://www.skadi.us/~kriegsmaschine/torrentsofspring.jpg

Ewergrin
Monday, March 8th, 2004, 12:29 AM
The Torrents of Spring by Ernest Hemingway

http://www.skadi.us/~kriegsmaschine/torrentsofspring.jpg

At only 90 pages in length, it took me an hour to read Hemingways first "novella."

Jack
Monday, March 22nd, 2004, 10:19 AM
Finished reading Crime and Punishment

Reading
The Brothers Karamazov and after that, Anna Karenina.

Mistress Klaus
Monday, March 22nd, 2004, 11:23 AM
"At Home with the Marquis de Sade" by Francine du Plessix Gray.
Next book I am going to read is "Twilight of the Wagners" by Gottfried Wagner.

Frans_Jozef
Monday, March 22nd, 2004, 02:28 PM
Raymond Riquet, Anthropologie du Neolithique et du Bronze Ancien.

Kurt Gerhardt, Die Glockenbecherleute in Mittel -und Westdeutschlands.

Vladimir V. Novotny(ed.)(Anthropos Institute-Moravian Museum), Fossil Man:New Facts-New Ideas, Papers in honour of Jan Jelinek's Life Anniversary.

Louise Brooks, Lulu in Hollywood.(there is more to life than just skulls and bones, but not so much more and neither of durable interest... :D)

Siegfried
Monday, March 22nd, 2004, 05:37 PM
Gevallen Engel: Leven en Werk van Leni Riefenstahl - Thomas Leeflang ("Fallen Angel: Life and Work of Leni Riefenstahl")

The Decline of the West - Oswald Spengler

The Open Society and Its Enemies - Karl Popper

Multiple books at the same time, as usual. :)

Esther_Helena
Monday, March 22nd, 2004, 07:38 PM
The Two Towers, by JRR Tolkien. Started reading it before the movie came out. I just finished the Helm's Deep chapter a few days ago. I read maybe 5 pages a week. I have the attention span of a mayfly on crack when it comes to reading. :P

White_Eagle
Tuesday, March 30th, 2004, 03:35 PM
Am currently reading "Rising 44" by Norman Davies.

This excellent book is about the Warsaw uprising in 1944.

WarMaiden
Tuesday, March 30th, 2004, 05:18 PM
I'm currently reading, I Strahd the War Against Azalin..


http://www.wizards.com/catalog/images/TSR08075_sm.jpg

AngryPotato
Monday, April 5th, 2004, 06:22 AM
I'm currently reading, I Strahd the War Against Azalin..
http://www.wizards.com/catalog/images/TSR08075_sm.jpg

Are you into R.A. Salvatore? I got into his Drizzt books about this time last year and blew threw about 15 books of his in a very short time. I love his descriptions of combat.


Currently reading: Culture of Critique by Kevin Macdonald.

I think I'll be posting in this thread a lot more after having the cable televitz switched off.

WarMaiden
Thursday, April 8th, 2004, 01:36 AM
I just finished... I Strahd, the war against Azalin - and i am now about 20 pages into "The knight of the black rose"

http://www.wizards.com/catalog/images/TSR08075_sm.jpg



http://www.dragonlance.olmer.ru/book15en.jpg

Ewergrin
Thursday, April 8th, 2004, 01:52 AM
I havent sat down with a good fantasy book in so long. I have read everything Tolkien has written so many times that I am actually very tired of it.
These past few years, I have found myself more and more intrigued by American satire and classics, hence Vonnegut (who is probably my favorite author) and Hemingway.

WarMaiden
Monday, April 12th, 2004, 07:05 PM
My husband loves fantasy books, so he has me reading them too lol.... I Strahd, memoirs of a vampire is probably my fav book so far... What fantasy books have you read?

Hails

Ewergrin
Monday, April 12th, 2004, 10:36 PM
What fantasy books have you read?


Hmm, hard to recall. Everything that Tolkien has written, (major works, plus Book of Lost Tales 1 and 2 plus various other non Middle-Earth related books. I really enjoy Micheal Moorcocks Elric Saga, plus Eternal Champion saga. How all of those novels are intertwined is really interesting. I have read many of Terry Brooks's Shanarra series, plus C.S. Lewish and the Narnia stuff. Other novels off hand that I can remember are The Raven Rose (authors name escapes me at the moment), and some of the Conan books.

I'm saving the best for last...

The Way of Wyrd by Brian Bates.

Of course, I can't really expect you to like this as much as I do, WarMaiden, considering it is about Anglo-Saxon paganism in England, but the plot goes like this:

A young christian monk/scribe, Wat Brand, is sent by his monastary to Southern England to learn the ways of the pagan peoples there, so that he can report the information back to his monastary, which they will then use to find a way to convert these "heathen souls" to Christianity, aka "saving" them. The pagan king of the area allows Wat Brand to travel his lands and learn the customs of the area, but only with a guide, who is a pagan sorcerer named Wulf. His first night upon the shores of this new land, Wulf does not show and Wat Brand, called Brand for short, is left alone, with only his wits to aid him. Immediately, the spirits are upon him. Wulf, meanwhile, knows what is happening and chooses to see how brand will react. Finally, the next day, Wulf greets brand and their journey begins. It is a short book, but is very jammed packed with information on pagan customs and the basics behind what is known as Wyrd (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wyrd). Fascinating book, and one that has changed my outlook on many things, and somewhat defines my particular brand of paganism, i.e. Wyrd + Odalism.


The Way of Wyrd, by Brian Bates (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0062500406/qid=1081805573/sr=1-1/ref=sr_1_1/102-8115348-0252943?v=glance&s=books) can be found at Amazon.com, just click the link.

WarMaiden
Monday, April 12th, 2004, 10:40 PM
The Way of Wyrd, by Brian Bates (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0062500406/qid=1081805573/sr=1-1/ref=sr_1_1/102-8115348-0252943?v=glance&s=books) can be found at Amazon.com, just click the link.

Amazon should be boycotted, they sell childrens porn and paedo related books, i will post info later today!

Hails

Ewergrin
Monday, April 12th, 2004, 11:35 PM
I had not heard that about Amazon. Please let us know! I try to boycott companies that aren't supportive of the same things I am, or who support things that I do not.

Anne14
Tuesday, April 13th, 2004, 12:48 AM
I'm not reading anything currently. It took me forever to finish "The Federal Seige At Ruby Ridge" (which was excellent btw). I just don't have the quiet time to sit and read anymore.

My favorite book is "The Mists of Avalon". I read it in 5th or 6th grade and nothing has compared to it since.

Ewergrin
Tuesday, April 13th, 2004, 12:55 AM
I read that a very long time ago, as well. How old are you Anne (if you dont mind my asking)?

Anne14
Tuesday, April 13th, 2004, 12:57 AM
I'm a ripe, old 34!

Ewergrin
Tuesday, April 13th, 2004, 01:01 AM
Ah, don't worry. There are plenty of things that old maids are good for. ;) JK!

Anne14
Tuesday, April 13th, 2004, 01:03 AM
lol!

Allenson
Thursday, April 15th, 2004, 04:21 PM
I'm a ripe, old 34!


Ah! I'll be there myself in just a few days! ;)


I am currently reading a book called "Race and Modern Science". It is actually a collection of essays by anthropolgists on the scientific realities of human geo-bio-variation. It was published in 1967 so much of the material is older and of course 'science' has learned a great deal since then--espcially in the field of population genetics--but it is very interesting nonetheless.

Anne14
Thursday, April 15th, 2004, 06:57 PM
I'm a ripe, old 34!


Ah! I'll be there myself in just a few days! ;)

Happy Birthday!!! :happybday

Annikaspapa
Saturday, April 17th, 2004, 09:23 AM
I'm curious as to what some of you fine folk are reading currently.
Come on, spill it - what is on your bookshelf?

Annikaspapa
Saturday, April 17th, 2004, 09:26 AM
My apologies... I see an identical thread already exists.

Sword Brethren
Saturday, April 17th, 2004, 09:26 AM
The Great Betrayal by Ian Douglas Smith (last white leader of Rhodesia, now Zimbabwe).


Finished a while ago

The Turner Diaries

The Camp Of The Saints

Plus, a whole slew of ww2 books. Lost Victories, Infantry Attacks, Panzer Commander, Achtung Panzer.

In the process of reading / using as reference material

The Inequality of Human Races

The Protocols of the Learned Elders of Zion.

Deling
Monday, April 19th, 2004, 01:06 PM
Emmanuel Todd, 'Aprés l'empire' (~Pretended Empire)
Charles Kupchan, 'End of the American Era'
Bhagavad-Gita (as it is)
'En svensk tiger' [Sweden during WW2]

kinvolk
Monday, April 19th, 2004, 05:24 PM
"Dirty little secrets of w.w.2", and "The Maggot" by John Fowles. The 1st is just packed with interesting info, Like the first German bomb to land in Leningrad killed the only elephant in the city's zoo. The second is kinda weird , if you ever read "The Magus" by the same author you know what I mean. I believe from the first 12 chapters that it is a fictional treatment of the begining of the "shaker" church. Plus a book on the 1st panzer army in normandy.

Oskorei
Monday, April 19th, 2004, 05:30 PM
Right now I am re-reading Julius Evola's "Revolt against the modern world" and the Lovecraft Omnibus (horror fiction).

Siegfried
Monday, April 19th, 2004, 05:40 PM
Goethe's Faust

Willowsprout
Monday, April 19th, 2004, 06:15 PM
"Angels & Demons" by Dan Brown who also wrote the "DaVinci code" which was fascinating.

Laedifox
Thursday, April 22nd, 2004, 06:51 PM
Quicksilver, by Neal Stephenson. Historical science fiction, if you will, featuring Isaac Newton, Ben Franklin, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, et. al. in the 17th/18th centuries.

(Willowsprout: I read the DaVinci code as well, in under 12 hours - a record! It was spectacular. Angels & Demons was fascinating too. Deception Point was good - gives paranoia a good name :) )

Annikaspapa
Saturday, April 24th, 2004, 06:59 AM
I forgot. I neglected to answer my own question...

Right now in my "I'm somewhere in the middle of it" pile:

Roland H. Bainton - "Here I Stand - a life of Martin Luther"
Mark Kurlansky - "Cod"
Andreas Mueller - "Grenzfälle im Herzen Deutschlands"
Rae Yang - "The Spider Eaters"
Diane Preston - "The Boxer Rebellion"
Stephan Grundy - "Rheingold" - now reading the German edition after having read the english original "Rhinegold" a number of times...

Vestmannr
Saturday, April 24th, 2004, 07:13 AM
"An Age of Tyrants: Britain and the Britons, A.D. 400-600", Christopher A. Snyder.

"Warlords and Holy Men, Scotland AD 80-1000. The New History of Scotland series", Alfred P. Smyth.

"The Races of Europe" and "The Living Races of Man", Carleton S. Coon (re-read).

"The Stonehenge People: an exploration of life in Neolithic Britain, 4700-2000 BC.", Rodney Castleden (since I picked it up for a thread here.)

"The Arthur of the Welsh: the Arthurian Legend in Medieval Welsh Literature", editors: Rachel Bromwich, A.O.H. Jarman, Brynley F. Roberts.

"Ritual of Royalty: the ceremony and pageantry of Britain's Monarchy", Michele Brown.

and oddly enough, a graphic novel:

"Age of Bronze: A Thousand Ships", Eric Shanower. Which is the beginning of a series recounting the Trojan war from beginning to end. Looks like a pretty good job, he actually researched it ... over 200 pages for the 1st volume, for a comic book. Gives me a bit of respect for the medium.

Erntearbeiter
Saturday, April 24th, 2004, 04:26 PM
THE NOTHING THAT IS, A Natural History of Zero
Robert Kaplan

Angelcynn Beorn
Friday, May 7th, 2004, 06:03 PM
Currently reading "an English Nationalism" by Tony Linsell, and re-reading the Wheel Of Time series by Robert Jordan, the only books ive ever read that challenge LOTR for scope, depth and complexity. :)

Siegfried
Friday, May 7th, 2004, 06:05 PM
I'm once again rereading parts of Evola's Revolt Against the Modern World and Yockey's Imperium. It seems these books are becoming more meaningful to me every week. :)
Also Coon's The Races of Europe, though I have to settle with the excerpts from the SNPA (http://www.fikas.no/~sprocket/snpa/) for now. :(

Moody
Friday, May 7th, 2004, 06:09 PM
L. Waddel's 'The Phoenician Origins of the Britons, Scots and Anglo-Saxons',
O. Mosley's 'The Alternative',
K. Grant's 'Sign and Sigil' on Austin Spare, and
Wm Blake 'The Complete Illuminated Books'

Oh, and Nietzsche's 'The Antichristian', of course [that's a re-read].

Jack
Thursday, May 13th, 2004, 01:18 AM
Currently reading:

The Kalevala
The Antichrist - Nietzsche (fourth time)
Thus Spoke Zarathustra - Nietzsche (fifth time)

Strengthandhonour
Thursday, May 13th, 2004, 01:42 AM
"An Age of Tyrants: Britain and the Britons, A.D. 400-600", Christopher A. Snyder.

"Warlords and Holy Men, Scotland AD 80-1000. The New History of Scotland series", Alfred P. Smyth.

"The Races of Europe" and "The Living Races of Man", Carleton S. Coon (re-read).

"The Stonehenge People: an exploration of life in Neolithic Britain, 4700-2000 BC.", Rodney Castleden (since I picked it up for a thread here.)

"The Arthur of the Welsh: the Arthurian Legend in Medieval Welsh Literature", editors: Rachel Bromwich, A.O.H. Jarman, Brynley F. Roberts.

"Ritual of Royalty: the ceremony and pageantry of Britain's Monarchy", Michele Brown.

and oddly enough, a graphic novel:

"Age of Bronze: A Thousand Ships", Eric Shanower. Which is the beginning of a series recounting the Trojan war from beginning to end. Looks like a pretty good job, he actually researched it ... over 200 pages for the 1st volume, for a comic book. Gives me a bit of respect for the medium.
I have read Age of Bronze. I thought it was quite good. But anyways, I am reading Don Quijote De La Mancha. Ah yes the great classic from Spain. Wonderful book. I recommend it to everyone. :D

svartabrandr
Thursday, May 13th, 2004, 09:01 AM
Right now I am reading the Sword of Truth series. I definatly recomend it to fantasy fans.

Mistress Klaus
Thursday, May 13th, 2004, 09:52 AM
At the moment. (again started reading multiple books at once! Can't help myself)

'Nazi Women' by Cate Haste
'The Secret History' (krap novel by Donna Tartt)
'The SS: Hitler's Instrument of Terror' by Gordon Williamson
'The Russian Front 1941-1945' by Bob Carruthers & John Erickson.

:D Living in the past...

Dr. Solar Wolff
Thursday, May 13th, 2004, 10:07 AM
"Trotzdem" by Hans Ulrich Rudel---not really, I only wish I could get a copy.

Siegfried
Thursday, May 13th, 2004, 10:15 AM
Study books about chemistry, biology, physics, virtue ethics, the ancient Greek language and the Industrial Revolution - yes, my finals are coming up :|

Frans_Jozef
Thursday, May 13th, 2004, 11:37 AM
John Gray, Straw Dogs. Thoughts on Humans and other animals.

Wiliam Howells, De godsdienst der primitieve volken(= The Heathens)

J. Russel Smith, Grassland and farmland as factors in the cyclical development of Eurasian history

(slow burning reads due to a lack of real spare time...)

Annikaspapa
Saturday, May 15th, 2004, 06:21 AM
(slow burning reads due to a lack of real spare time...)

I know exactly what you mean ;) . The time is just not available to read at the pace that I feel is necessary to continue to expand my horizions... Work obligations, wife and child, renewed academic activities, increased time in the great outdoors (increases as the temperatures rise) – all take me away from my favorite reading chair. Oh to have the lazy days of youth back. It's odd - I'm quite certain the day still had only 24 hours then, but it seemed easier to get so much more done... The availability of reading material online sometimes seems more a curse than a blessing. Nothing can beat the time spent within the crisp pages of a quality book...

God bless that son of Mainz - Johannes Gutenberg!

Jack
Sunday, May 30th, 2004, 12:27 PM
I'm currently reading The Kalevala and The Will to Power by Nietzsche.

Ewergrin
Sunday, May 30th, 2004, 01:42 PM
I'm currently reading The Kalevala and The Will to Power by Nietzsche.

How are you enjoying The kalevala thus far?
Tis a long winded book and a difficult one to follow, but an amazing story nonetheless.I woud much prefer to hear it told in the oral tradition that it is known for, as English translation looses much context and meaning, I'm sure.

Siegfried
Saturday, June 5th, 2004, 08:43 PM
The Birth of Tragedy - Friedrich Nietzsche
The Holy Blood and the Holy Grail - Michael Baigent, Richard Leigh & Henry Lincoln
Iliad - Homerus
Fingerprints of the Gods - Graham Hancock

Nefertari
Monday, June 7th, 2004, 05:50 PM
After reading this thread, I don't feel so bad being 33. ;)

Anyway, I just finished the 3rd George R.R. Martin book and am impatiently waiting for the 4th to come out. Other than that, I get my daily dose of Warren Ellis at diepunyhumans.com.

Mistress Klaus
Tuesday, June 15th, 2004, 02:26 PM
Current book...'The Berkut' by Joseph Heywood. A novel that entertains the idea that Hitler used a double for the bunker suicide & escaped.

Nefertari
Tuesday, June 15th, 2004, 05:34 PM
Current book...'The Berkut' by Joseph Heywood. A novel that entertains the idea that Hitler used a double for the bunker suicide & escaped.

Sounds interesting!

Does it provide solid facts and proof, or is it mostly theoretic?

Mac Seafraidh
Thursday, June 17th, 2004, 08:45 AM
Mein Kampf suprisingly. I had never read it but read excerpts from it and I first read the first chapter online, before I bought it. I am really falling into a deep read with this book. :thumbsup

Allenson
Friday, June 18th, 2004, 01:07 PM
I'm now onto "The Dispossessed Majority" by Wilmot Robertson. I strongly reommend this title to any New World Europids concerned about our dispossession... :smt012

Mistress Klaus
Friday, June 18th, 2004, 01:13 PM
Current book...'The Berkut' by Joseph Heywood. A novel that entertains the idea that Hitler used a double for the bunker suicide & escaped.

Sounds interesting!

Does it provide solid facts and proof, or is it mostly theoretic?

:smt001 It is pretty imagination running wild kinda stuff.. It isn't entirely impossible to imagine Hitler using a double. The speculation that the charred remains of supposedly Hitler & Eva were really them has always created doubt.
The book describes....How Hitler & Eva went into their bunker bedroom for the double suicide. Hitler gives Eva the cyanide capsule first. She bites it & dies. Then he takes his shoes off & clothes off & taps this wall vent (that leads to a hidden tunnel, where a double of Hitler & Gunter Brumm are waiting). The changeover is quick and then the poor double is shot in the head & sat next to Eva. (Though I can't understand that bit...why would anyone volunteer to die...the victim must have known what his fate was..yet he acted shocked?..)...Anyway...Hitler gets away in the tunnel with Gunter & then his face & hair is shaved. His nose broken & a Jewish number tattooed on his arm..( :smt005 how funny is that...& Hitler going crazy when it was being done by Gunter...abit overboard with the disguise I think...ha ha). They do some cross country getaway...I haven't finished it yet. I am interested to know if the Russians end up capturing him. :smt003


I find the actual title interesting in relation to the topic of the book.
BERKUT: A exotic kind of wolf hunting that involves the use of eagles..used in Kirghizia,South-central Russia. The birds are specially bred & trained & slam into the wolf's back with such force, it causes the wolf to be nearly paralysed. The eagle holds onto the wolfs spine with one foot, and when the wolf turns it head to bite...the eagles grabs/binds its nose to suffocate and hold it down..until the tribesmen come over to kill it. (poor wolf :smt010 )

PsycholgclMishap
Sunday, June 20th, 2004, 08:49 PM
Literature from the City of San Diego, the California Franchise Tax Board, and the Internal Revenue Service.

I am registering a non-profit organization, obtaining a Business Tax Certificate (Business License), and a Promoter's License.

Mistress Klaus
Tuesday, July 13th, 2004, 02:19 PM
Just an update on the (now)previous book I was reading 'The Berkut'...
Well the Russians did in fact get Hitler...and the ending disgusted me somewhat...

Stalin held Hitler in a cage for 7 years. A cage that allowed neither the prisoner to sit nor stand. Naked, covered in sores & excretment... both legs partially amputated,...finally put out of his misery just minutes before Stalin's death.

:smt011

Jack
Monday, July 19th, 2004, 08:42 AM
*laughs* Postmodernism is cool.

The Archaeology of Knowledge - Michael Foucault
Understanding Foucault - Geoff Danaheir, Tony Schirato, Jen Webb
Positions - Jacques Derrida
Specters of Marx - Jacques Derrida
The Seduction of Unreason: The Intellectual Romance with Fascism - From Nietzsche to Postmodernism - Richard Wolin

Telperion
Monday, July 19th, 2004, 04:44 PM
Currently reading The Epic of Gilgamesh (Penguin Classics translation). Very interesting.

ogenoct
Tuesday, July 20th, 2004, 02:18 AM
I am currently reading a collection of essays by North Korea's Dear Leader Kim Jong Il.

Constantin

http://www.newsmax.com/weasels/images/2-spades.gif

Moti_ragnarokum
Tuesday, July 20th, 2004, 01:01 PM
The Mars Mystery, Graham Hancock
Riding the Tiger, Julius Evola
La Crise du Monde Moderne (The crisis of the modern world), René Guénon
La Naissance de la Tragedie (The birth of tragedy), Nietzsche
Bhagavad-Gita

Mac Seafraidh
Wednesday, August 11th, 2004, 11:54 PM
The Goebbels Dairies 1939-1941 Translated and Edited by Fed Taylor Foreward by John Keegan

Nordgau
Thursday, August 12th, 2004, 02:29 AM
My momentary program. Naziocentric surely:

- Birgit Kletzin: Europa aus Rasse und Raum. Die nationalsozialistische Idee der Neuen Ordnung [Europe out of Race and Space. The National Socialist Concept of the New Order], Münster 2000.

- Uwe Mai: "Rasse und Raum". Agrarpolitik, Sozial- und Raumplanung im NS-Staat ["Race and Space". Agrarian Politics, Social and Space Planning in the NS State], Munich - Vienna - Zürich 2002.

- Bruno Petermann: Das Problem der Rassenseele. Vorlesungen zur Grundlegung einer allgemeinen Rassenpsychologie [The Problem of the Race Soul. Lectures for the Founding of a General Race Psychology], Leipzig 1935.

- Ilse Schwidetzky: Rassen und Rassenbildung beim Menschen [Races and Race Evolution at Man], Stuttgart 1979.

- Dieter Bartetzko: Zwischen Zucht und Ekstase. Zur Theatralik von NS-Architektur [Between Discipline and Ecstasy. On the Staginess of NS Architecture], Berlin 1985.

- Dieter Bartetzko: Illusionen in Stein. Stimmungsarchitektur im deutschen Faschismus. Ihre Vorgeschichte in Theater- und Film-Bauten , Reinbek bei Hamburg 19985.

- Rainer Zitelmann/Michael Prinz (ed.): [i]Nationalsozialismus und Modernisierung [National Socialism and Modernisation], Darmstadt ²1994.

- Stephan Malinowski: Vom König zum Führer. Sozialer Niedergang und politische Radikalisierung im deutschen Adel zwischen Kaiserreich und NS-Staat [From King to Führer. Social Decline and Political Radicalization in German Nobility Between Imperial Germany and NS State], Berlin 2003.

- Detlev J. K. Peukert: Die Weimarer Republik. Krisenjahre der klassischen Moderne [The Weimar Republic. The Crisis Years of Classical Modernity], Frankfurt am Main 1987.

- Riccardo Bavaj: Die Ambivalenz der Moderne im Nationalsozialismus. Eine Bilanz der Forschung [The Ambivalency of Modernity in National Socialism. A Balance of Scientific Research, Munich 2003.

- Wolfgang Michalka (ed.): Die nationalsozialistische Machtergreifung [The National Socialist Seizure of Power], Paderborn - Munich - Vienna - Zürich 1984.

- Diethart Kerbs/Heinrich Stahr (ed.): Berlin 1932. Das letzte Jahr der ersten deutschen Republik. Politik, Symbole, Medien [Berlin 1932. The Last Year of the First German Republic. Politics, Symbols, Media, Berlin 1992.

- Armin Mohler: Die Konservative Revolution in Deutschland 1918-1932. Ein Handbuch [The Conservative Revolution in Germany 1918-1932. A Handbook], Darmstadt ³1989.

- Stefan Breuer: Anatomie der Konservativen Revolution [Anatomy of the Conservative Revolution], Darmstadt 1995.

- Fritz Kern: Stammbaum und Artbild der Deutschen. Ein kultur- und rassengeschichtlicher Versuch [Ancestry and Type Image of the Germans. A Culture- and Race-Historical Attempt], Munich 1927.

- Werner Bräuninger: Hitlers Kontrahenten in der NSDAP 1921-1945 [Hitler's Contrahents in the NSDAP 1921-1945], Munich 2004.

Jack
Friday, August 13th, 2004, 05:51 PM
Currently reading

Specters of Marx - Jacques Derrida
Positions - Jacques Derrida
The Passion of the Western Mind - Richard Tarnas
The Postmodernism Reader - Michael Drolet
The Logic of Scientific Discovery - Karl Popper
The Thirteenth Tribe - Arthur Koestler
The Archaeology of Knowledge - Michel Foucault

Zyklop
Friday, August 13th, 2004, 06:02 PM
Currently reading classical Blut und Boden literature:

Der Wehrwolf - Hermann Löns

Telperion
Saturday, August 14th, 2004, 11:40 PM
Now reading The Golden Bough (Oxford World's Classics abridged version) by James George Frazer.

Grimr
Saturday, August 14th, 2004, 11:55 PM
I am currently reading:

Anna Karenin ~Tolstoy
The art of war ~Machiaveli
Jackboot ~John Laffin

Zyklop
Sunday, August 15th, 2004, 02:57 PM
What are you currently reading?

Here:

Der Wehrwolf by Hermann Löns

Quite popular and controversial book, written 1910. Its story centers around a group of northern German moor-peasants who lead a bloody partisan war against looters, plunderers and gypsies during the 30-years war.

Der Wehrwolf is usually referred to as "Blut und Boden" literature and therefore it nowadays has a bad reputation. It also was the eponym for German partisan groups at the end of WW2.

The writer, Hermann Löns, fell in WW1.

Rachel
Sunday, August 15th, 2004, 07:56 PM
The Celts by Nora Chadwick
Jewish Supremacism by David Duke
The story of the Jewish people Vol. 1 by Jack M. Myers
Origin of races by Carleton Coon

I also started a couple WWII books a year ago and still haven't gotten around to finishing them :redface:

:hveðrungur:
Sunday, August 15th, 2004, 08:11 PM
I am currently reading the northern European forum :D

Ok seriously, im waiting for temple of wotan to come in the mail allready damnit :mad:

Zyklop
Sunday, August 15th, 2004, 08:35 PM
I also started a couple WWII books a year ago and still haven't gotten around to finishing them :redface:

Don´t want to spoil your reading pleasure but Germany lost in the end :(

Freja
Sunday, August 15th, 2004, 09:10 PM
Just started reading a biography on Sylvia Plath. I wish I had more time to read. I love spending time in libraries, and next time I´m going to look for Origin of races.

cosmocreator
Sunday, August 15th, 2004, 09:14 PM
Advanced Screenwriting: Raising Your Script to the Academy Award Level
by Dr Linda Seger.

Ya, probably not what you expected , eh?

NSFreja
Monday, August 16th, 2004, 06:05 PM
Tragödie um die Treue by Tieke

FadeTheButcher
Tuesday, August 17th, 2004, 07:06 AM
Kosovo: Facing the Court of History (2004)
by Branislav Krstić-Brano
translated by Ivanka Grković

The Nature of Political Theory (2004)
by Andrew Vincent

norcalnative1971
Wednesday, August 18th, 2004, 02:42 AM
What are you currently reading?


I'm re-reading Did Six Million Really Die? for the first time in years...that is, until my copy of the FULL version of the Lightning and the Sun arrives. Yeah, I just found one to buy. :D

AngryPotato
Wednesday, August 18th, 2004, 03:42 AM
The Iron Dream by Spinrad

A man needs a little sci-fi in between studies. :icon_mrgr

anti-climacus
Thursday, August 19th, 2004, 04:43 AM
schopenhauer-essays and aphorisms

Mac Seafraidh
Monday, August 23rd, 2004, 07:16 PM
Okay, kinda pathetic. I have not finish Mein Kampf yet or really even started The Goebbels Diaries either. This internet is pulling me in too much and I am dealing with horrible memory and stress lately. I went to the library today and picked up 5 books.

1. Romanian Phrase Book - Dorling Kindersley Travel Guides

2. Deutsche und Englisch Redewendungen - By Henry Strutz

3. Hitler's Second Book The Unpublished Sequel to Mein Kampf - by Gerhard L. "Weinberg"

4. The World of Great Composers From Palestrina to Debussy - David Ewen

5. Inside the Third Reich Memoires - Albert Speer

Siegfried
Monday, August 23rd, 2004, 08:32 PM
Imperium: The Philosophy of History and Politics
- Francis Parker Yockey

Men Among the Ruins: Post-War Reflections of a Radical Traditionalist
- Julius Evola

Militant Imperium: An Extensive, Chapter-by-Chapter Summary of Julius Evola's 'Men Among the Ruins'
- Troy Southgate

Art Forms in Nature
- Ernst Haeckel

ogenoct
Monday, August 23rd, 2004, 09:39 PM
- THE THIRD ROME - National Bolshevism in the USSR by Mikhail Agursky

- a collection of essays by Ernst Niekisch

- JULIUS STREICHER by Randall L. Bytwerk

C.

Mac Seafraidh
Wednesday, September 22nd, 2004, 05:00 AM
I just bought Sicilian - Dictionary and Phrasebook and Beginners Guide to Sicilian.(both by Joseph F. Privitera)

Vestmannr
Wednesday, September 22nd, 2004, 05:27 AM
Starting "Space" by James Michener.
Also, several Spanish textbooks to recover my fluency, a gift from a Honduran Spanish friend.

Mac Seafraidh
Friday, September 24th, 2004, 09:10 PM
I doubt I will even finish these, like I usually say, but I will glance and read as much as I can ;( (took them out at the library today. I must focus on my German(relearn) and Sicilian(learn))

Norweigian Verbs and Essentials of Grammer - Louis Janus

Oxford Dictionary of Modern Greek - J.T. Pring

The UnDutchables - Colin White and Laurie Boucke

The Goebbels Diaries 1939-41(again)- Fred Taylor

Everything Irish - Lelia Ruckenstein and James A. O'Malley

Siegmund
Friday, September 24th, 2004, 10:13 PM
Study:

GWF Hegel. Phenomenology of Spirit (Oxford, 1977).
David Irving. Hitler's War & The War Path (Focal Point, 2002).
John Russon. Human Experience, Philosophy, Neurosis, and the Elements of Everyday Life (SUNY, 2003).

Fun:

Christopher Ailsby. Hitler's Renegades: Foreign Nationals in the Service of the Third Reich (Brassey's, 2004).
Lucius Shepard. The Golden (Mark V. Ziesing, 1993)
Jacques Deletant. Colloquial Romanian (Routledge, 2002)

Bought on Wednesday at two of my favorite San Francisco bookstores:

Malcolm Quinn. The Swastika: Constructing the Symbol (Routledge, 1994).
Stephen E. Flowers. The Secret King: Karl Maria Wiligut, Himmler's Lord of the Runes (Rûna-Raven, 2001).
Jean Hall. The Transforming Image: A Study of Shelley's Major Poetry (Illinois, 1980).

Siegmund
Friday, September 24th, 2004, 10:25 PM
Next book I am going to read is "Twilight of the Wagners" by Gottfried Wagner. Another portrait of the Wagner family that might interest you is provided by great-granddaughter Nike, in her The Wagners: The Dramas of a Musical Dynasty (Princeton, 1998). I don't know which is more interesting, the book itself or the hilarious customer reviews on Amazon (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/069108811X/qid=1096060236/sr=1-1/ref=sr_1_1/103-9073255-2976606?v=glance&s=books).

http://pup.princeton.edu/images/k7035.gif

Nordgau
Friday, September 24th, 2004, 10:38 PM
There's also "Wagner's Hitler" by Joachim Köhler. A bit crazy, that book, almost having the theory that Hitler's mind was created and his act was controlled by the Wagner clan in Bayreuth... :P

http://www.traveldirectorynet.co.uk/images/0745622399.JPG

Siegfried
Sunday, September 26th, 2004, 08:54 PM
Nobilitas - Alexander Jacob


Nobilitas is a study of the history of aristocratic philosophy from ancient Greece to the early twentieth century that aims at providing an alternative to the liberal democratic norms, which are propagated today as the only viable socio-political system for the world community. Jacob reveals that, contrary to popular belief, the social and cultural development of European civilization has, for twenty-five centuries, been based not on democratic or communist notions but, rather on aristocratic and nationalist notions. Beginning with the political philosophies of Plato and Aristotle, and continuing through Renaissance and Baroque aristocratic philosophers, the German Idealists, and English and Italian nationalists, the study ends with the transformation of aristocratic philosophy in nineteenth century Germany into racist elitism. As such, the study includes a survey of the philosophical bases of racism and anti-Semitism. These topics have been systematically excluded from academic and political debate since the end of the last Great War. This study is a pioneering work in understanding and changing political ideologies.


Storm of Steel - Ernst Jünger


"Sublime ... Precise, economical, taut, interspersed with earthy humour and reflections, often uncanny, that linger in the memory" -Daniel Johnson, 'Daily Telegraph'

A memoir of astonishing power, savagery and ashen lyricism, 'Storm of Steel' depicts Ernst Jünger's experience of combat in the German front line - leading raiding parties, defending trenches against murderous British incursions, and simply enduring as shells tore his comrades apart. One of the greatest books to emerge from the catastrophe of the First World War, it illuminates like no other work not only the horrors but also the fascination of a war that made men keep fighting on for four long years.

"Extraordinary ... a unique insight into the compelling nature of organized, industrialized violence. Michael Hoffman's superlative translation retains all the coruscating vitality of the original." -Niall Ferguson

"Outstanding ... a blueprint for surviving, at least in a spiritual sense, the madness of war in a mechanized age ... Hoffman's interpretation is superb." -Paul Watkins, 'The Times'

"A lyrical evocation of machine-age battle." -Max Egremont, 'Literary Review'


The Genealogy of Aesthetics - Ekbert Faas


Is it body or spirit that makes us appreciate beauty and create art? The distinguished Canadian critic Ekbert Faas argues that, with occasional exceptions like Montaigne and Mandeville, the mainstream of western thinking about beauty from Plato onwards has overemphasized the spirit, or even execrated the body and sexuality as inimical to the aesthetic disposition. The Genealogy of Aesthetics redresses this imbalance, and offers a radical re-reading of seminal thinkers such as Plato, Augustine, Kant, Hegel, Heidegger, and Derrida. Professor Faas tells a new and exciting story: of the Platonic inversion of Homeric pagan values, of their absorption into Christian theology and eventual secularization, of Kant's great reworking of this tradition, of Hegel's prophecy of the death of art in the ultimate triumph of spirit over body and, finally, of the revival of the aesthetic/ascetic ideal in Heidegger, Derrida, and their followers. Professor Faas attacks both the traditional and the postmodern consensus, and offers a new pro-sensualist aesthetics, heavily influenced by Nietzsche, as well as drawing on contemporary neo-Darwinian cognitive science. A work of both polemic and profound learning, The Genealogy of Aesthetics marks a radical new departure in thinking about art which no future work in this field can afford to ignore.


The Culture of Critique - Kevin MacDonald


It is the third and final volume developing an evolutionary perspective on Judaism. [...] However, whereas in the previous works ethnic conflict consisted mainly of recounting the oftentimes bloody dynamics of Jewish-Gentile conflict over the broad expanse of historical time, the focus here is on the world of ideas and ideologies. [...] Particular attention will be paid to the Boasian school of anthropology, psychoanalysis, leftist political ideology and behavior, the New York intellectuals, and the Frankfurt School of Social Research. In addition, I describe Jewish efforts to shape United States Immigration policy in opposition to the interests of the peoples of non-Jewish European descent, particularly the peoples of Northern and Western Europe. An important thesis is that all of these movements may be seen as attempts to alter Western societies in a manner that would neutralize or end anti-Semitism and provide for Jewish group continuity either in an overt or in a semi-cryptic manner. [...] The first paperback edition of The Culture of Critique includes a new preface where I attempt to answer some typical criticisms that have been leveled against CofC. I also discuss issues raised by several books that appeared since the publication of CofC. These issues include Jewish involvement in Communism, the emergence of the Holocaust as a central cultural icon in Western societies, Jewish involvement in the U.S. media, and the role of Jewish organizations in censoring the internet.


Great books :thumbsup

Frans_Jozef
Sunday, September 26th, 2004, 09:02 PM
James Mellaart, The Neolithic of the Near East.

Carl Schmitt, Terre et Mer.

Hendrik Marsman, Zelfportret van J.F.

Johannes de León
Sunday, September 26th, 2004, 09:27 PM
Currently re-reading Virgil's Aeneid for university purposes. :)

Taras Bulba
Sunday, September 26th, 2004, 11:09 PM
Well I just ordered Hilaire Belloc's famous The Servile State. Should arrive in a few days. :)

http://www.distributism.com/reviews.htm#The Servile State

The Servile State, by Hilaire Belloc

In this liberty classic, the Catholic intellectual Hilaire Belloc writes that the present system of capitalism is likely to give rise to something new, the servile state, because of inherent instabilities within it. Belloc defines this state as, "That arrangement of society in which so considerable a number of the families and individuals are constrained by positive law to labor for the advantage of other families and individuals as to stamp the whole community with the mark of such labor we call the servile state." This servile state is a return to the form of pagan slavery that existed in Europe before the advent of Christianity abolished it. Belloc contends that from the original pagan form of slavery, Christianity brought about a new system of society, the distributist society. In this system, every individual was an owner of property and belonged to guilds which allowed for him to own the means of production. However, the distributist system failed with the breakdown of the Christian faith. For example, the Reformation allowed for the Crown to confiscate monastic lands. Thus, a small group of individuals, the capitalists, came to own the means of production and the property.

Belloc does not blame the existence of capitalism on the Industrial Revolution like most other thinkers have. Rather, he sees the problem in society as existing before the Industrial Revolution. Belloc contends that had distributism not broken down, the Industrial Revolution would have been beneficial to all concerned. The current system of the capitalist state is unstable however, and may give rise to one of two separate things. Reformers have tried to create from the capitalist system a collectivist (or socialist) state. In the collectivist state, private property would be abolished and a group of managers would control all property for the proletariat in trust. Belloc contends that this form of collectivism is likely to give rise to a third thing, the servile state. One way reformers have tried to accomplish this goal is through "buying out" capitalism. Since the state is an older institution than the capitalist owners, it has been considered possible that the state can "buy out" the capitalists. Belloc finds such an idea problematic and shows how this is not possible to occur. Alternatively, the other possibility is for society to return to a distributist system in which all individuals own property and the means of production. Belloc finds this alternative to be the best, however, he notes that it is unlikely to happen given the current direction in which society is taking and amounts to "swimming upstream". So, while the socialist alternative works within the capitalist system, it will ultimately lead to servitude. Belloc points out examples of how legislation designed to benefit the proletariat has actually increased the development of the servile state. Examples of this include regulation such as employee compensation and minimum wage laws, which were in the initial stages of being enacted in Belloc's England. The future for freedom looks grim because the proletariat is willing to give up its political freedom in exchange for security and guarantee of subsistence standards. For example, Belloc points out that minimum wage laws actually benefit capitalists because they guarantee that there will not be unruliness among the workers. Also, such laws and regulations involve the creation of a class distinction between proletariat and employer.

Given the direction the welfare state has taken contrary to liberty and towards further regulation, these cogent writings of Belloc from near the beginning of this last century serve as an important warning and prophecy for the future. We have indeed headed in the direction of servitude, and Belloc's distributist ideal seems less and less likely. (Available at Amazon)

Taras Bulba
Sunday, September 26th, 2004, 11:56 PM
Im sure Rusalka will be pleased that Im also reading The Circassians : a handbook by Amjad M. Jaimoukha. Lots of interesting information about these people. While first glancing through it I read about how Circassian girls were in high demand among the royal households in the Caucacus and Middle East, and how their beauty was well known and documented. :D

jdster
Monday, September 27th, 2004, 07:03 AM
The Book of Liberation Through Understanding in the Between
(aka Bardo Thodol aka The Tibetan Book of the Dead)

The Awakening of Intelligence by J Krishnamurti

Mason & Dixon by Thomas Pynchon

A Pessimist's Guide to History by Stuart Flexner

anti-climacus
Thursday, September 30th, 2004, 04:19 AM
evola-men amongst the ruins
nietzsche-ecce homo

Nefertari
Thursday, September 30th, 2004, 05:45 PM
Currently, I'm studying General Mediation Training/Requirements and am getting ready to specialize in Separation/Divorce Mediation. I do not have weekends to relax with a novel. :smt012

Siegfried
Thursday, September 30th, 2004, 09:59 PM
Storm of Steel (Ernst Jünger), Culture of Critique (Kevin MacDonald), Genealogy of Aesthetics (Ekbert Faas), and the Bhagavad-Gita.

Olga
Thursday, September 30th, 2004, 11:14 PM
Z. Mikolejko - The myths of Integral Traditionalism (without the cover: I've got a young alaskan malamute at home, he stole me the book and ate the cover :angry )

ogenoct
Friday, October 1st, 2004, 11:37 AM
"Ernst Niekisch - Völkischer Sozialismus, nationale Revolution, deutsches
Endimperium" von Michael Pittwald

C.

Scáthach
Friday, October 1st, 2004, 06:22 PM
THe decline and fall of the Roman Empire - Gibbon

Hitler's willing executioners - Goldhagen :D

Fraxinus Excelsior
Friday, October 1st, 2004, 08:12 PM
The "Confessions" of Kurt Gerstein, by Henri Roques (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0939484277/ref=pd_ir_imp/103-4043603-4845455)

The Dispossessed Majority, by Wilmot Robertson (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0914576151/ref=pd_ir_imp/103-4043603-4845455)

Neither Left nor Right: Fascist Ideology in France, by Zeev Sternhell (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0691006296/ref=pd_ir_imp/103-4043603-4845455)

Zyklop
Saturday, October 2nd, 2004, 08:31 AM
Goebbels by David Irving
The Young Hitler I Knew by August Kubizek

Dr. Solar Wolff
Saturday, October 2nd, 2004, 08:57 AM
Friedrich Georg: "Hitlers Siegeswaffen Band 2: Star Wars 1947 Teilband B: Von der Amerikarakete zur Orbitalstation-Deutschlands Streben nach Interkontinentalwaffen und das erste Weltraumprogramm", a signed gift by the author.

This is one in a series which highlights the suppressed technology of the 3rd Reich. I only wish it and other books like it were made textbooks in Germany today so that Germans would know what they have accomplished and what was stolen from them.

war
Saturday, October 2nd, 2004, 01:15 PM
Once again (2nd time) the Turner Diaries, because I can not get enought of it ;)

Oskorei
Saturday, October 2nd, 2004, 01:34 PM
While the Gods play by Alain Danielou (a good explanation of Shaiva Hinduism)

How to loose friends and alienate people by Toby Young (a diary of sorts about the life of celebrity journalists in the US)

At the moment I am also eagerly awaiting The Yoga of Power by Julius Evola, The King of the World by Guenon and a collection by Hakim Bey.

Siegfried
Saturday, October 2nd, 2004, 06:13 PM
Threads merged.

Mac Seafraidh
Sunday, October 3rd, 2004, 08:04 PM
Okay(LOL) This time I am ("Currently Reading" something finally)


MASTER THE Basics(A series by BARRON'S) GERMAN Second Edition - Graves and (Strutz :| )

I really like this book !!! Helping my once Advanced Placement skills!!!

Telperion
Thursday, October 14th, 2004, 10:20 PM
I'm currently reading The Silmarillion, the last time I read it being 13 years ago. The depth of detail in the story is certainly quite remarkable.

Ewergrin
Tuesday, October 19th, 2004, 02:23 AM
Friedrich Nietzsche
The Birth of Tragedy and
The Geneology of Morals.

WarMaiden
Tuesday, October 19th, 2004, 06:46 AM
Just about to start a book by Julius Evola!!

http://library.flawlesslogic.com/evola.gif

Siegfried
Saturday, October 23rd, 2004, 05:28 PM
Hitler and the Power of Aesthetics - Frederic Spotts


Frederic Spotts, the author of Bayreuth, here develops a radical new interpretation of Hitler's character and actions which sees an obsessive artistry as the driving force behind his career and his hold over the German people.

Hitler's aim was the Aryan super-state, but it was to be expressed as much in art as in politics. Culture was not only the end, to which power should aspire, but the means of achieving it. This fundamental reassessment both of Hitler's career and of artistic life in the Third Reich shows that the arts were at the centre of his life and that he was at the centre of the arts. He dissolved the line between art and politics and - through spectacles, parades, festivals, rallies, political theatrics and even architecture - turned the entire German nation into participants in his National Socialist drama.

Siegfried
Tuesday, October 26th, 2004, 07:38 PM
A Game of Thrones - George R.R. Martin

Gornahoor
Wednesday, October 27th, 2004, 04:42 AM
Which Way Western Man by William Gayley Simpson
-- A pleasant surprise, much better than I had anticipated. Highly recommended.

The Wisdom of Ancient Cosmology, by Wofgang Smith
-- Quantum Physics through the eyes of a Traditionalist Catholic

Revolt Against the Modern World, by Julius Evola
-- Mandatory reading for the man of Tradition

The Textbook of the Universe, by Steven Romer
-- On the list, so no opinion at this point

Alkman
Wednesday, October 27th, 2004, 03:08 PM
Diogenes of Oenoanda- The Fragments

Prince Eugen
Wednesday, October 27th, 2004, 04:03 PM
Sillmarilion by J.R.R.Tolkien!

Taras Bulba
Wednesday, October 27th, 2004, 04:21 PM
Too busy to read anything nowadays! :(

WarMaiden
Monday, November 1st, 2004, 06:12 AM
Friedrich Nietzsche
The Birth of Tragedy and
The Geneology of Morals.

I've never read a book by Friedrich Nietzsche, is he easy to read? I've only read snipits and quotes!!!

Jack
Monday, November 1st, 2004, 11:50 AM
The Thirteenth Tribe - Arthur Koestler
The Archaeology of Knowledge - Michel Foucault
On War - Carl Von Clausewitz
Infidels: A History of the Conflict between Christendom and Islam - Andrew Wheatcroft

Siegfried
Monday, November 1st, 2004, 11:52 AM
Die Rassen der Menschheit ; a German translation of John R. Baker's Race.

Blood_Axis
Monday, November 1st, 2004, 02:15 PM
I read the Da Vinci Code over the weekend.. Awsome!!! :D 1

I am also reading Hitler's War by David Irving interchangeably with "A History of Facism" by Stanley Payne and also various books on Greek and Scandinavian Mythology ;)

Also, a book called "Arktos: The Polar Myth and Science, Symbolism and Nazi Survival" by Jocelyn Godwyn.1
I have the bad habit of rading too many books at the same time so I rarely get to finish most of them :P

Taras Bulba
Monday, November 1st, 2004, 04:29 PM
I read the Da Vinci Code over the weekend.. Awsome!!! :D 1

So what do you think of the "history" presented in the novel?

Blood_Axis
Monday, November 1st, 2004, 05:38 PM
So what do you think of the "history" presented in the novel?I had read related writings previously so I wasn't totally unfamiliar to the ideas presented in this book.
I was fascinated as to the clever and elaborate plot of the story.
As to the "history" behind it, I am sceptical, as to any other theological notion.
It is an interesting version of things that cannot be proven beyond a reasonable doubt, but on the other hand, what other version can be?

I think that is the backbone of the story,
the fact that it capitalizes on the fact that, when it comes to religion, anything goes.
That there is no place for reason in faith, and that any version of things is acceptable as long as people believe in it.

Therefore, I guess the primary message of this story was that we are entering the "age of the aquarius" in which sceptisism will prevail over dogmatism.

gorgeousgal2k2
Monday, November 1st, 2004, 06:12 PM
the davinci code is great, even though I'm pretty sure alot of it is a load of crap. It was a good story though.

Triglav
Tuesday, November 2nd, 2004, 07:49 PM
is he easy to read? I've only read snipits and quotes!!!

Not really. ;)

PsycholgclMishap
Tuesday, November 2nd, 2004, 09:22 PM
Not really. ;)

Indeed. Nietzsche is among the more complicated of all writers, I'd say.

Siegfried
Wednesday, November 3rd, 2004, 09:16 PM
I've never read a book by Friedrich Nietzsche, is he easy to read? I've only read snipits and quotes!!!

Contrary to many other philosophers (like Kant), he doesn't use very complicated language. That doesn't mean he's easy to digest though. I think that if you really want to understand what he's saying and why he's saying it, you'll have to read several of his books and perhaps some background information on his life. I'd start with Beyond Good and Evil and/or Dawn.

Willowsprout
Saturday, November 6th, 2004, 05:38 PM
I am currently reading "Holy Blood,Holy Grail. Not as adventerous as the DaVinci Code" but, interesting!

WarMaiden
Saturday, November 6th, 2004, 06:51 PM
I started "Journey to America" Fiona Mcgilrays Story..

A Voyage from Ireland in 1849..

irishpride74
Saturday, November 13th, 2004, 07:03 PM
Well, Ijust got done reading Dirty White Boys by Stephen Hunter& am in the middle of Mein Kamph.

AngryPotato
Monday, November 15th, 2004, 05:21 AM
Defensive Racism by Edgar Steele

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0976125900/qid=1100495080/sr=1-1/ref=sr_1_1/104-9308437-4437555?v=glance&s=books

From receiving Mr Steele's weekly reading I can say that he is a brilliant man, whether I agree with him 100% or not is something else to discuss.


Defensive Racism
by Edgar J. Steele

Product Description:
NEW AMERICA IS COMING...

And it isn’t pretty. Foreseeing a collapse so severe that it will cause us to start numbering our economic depressions, Edgar J. Steele paints the image of an America rarely seen in mainline media: ripped apart by racial strife, seething with resentment and verging on open warfare in the city streets.

Methodically constructing the case for acknowledging the racial differences embedded in our DNA, to which he refers as "culture gone to seed," Steele blows the cover off the conspiracy for the New World Order which is turning America into a police state and rendering her electoral process meaningless.

As the world relentlessly marches into World War III, the plans of the elite for America’s subjugation to third-world status will falter, with America breaking apart along racial lines.

Steele conjures the vision of a New America, rising Phoenix-like from the ashes and resurrecting the principles of liberty and personal freedom upon which she originally was founded, all the while charting a clear, easy to follow path for the individual through the coming chaos.

Bold, powerful and persuasive, Defensive Racism weaves a compelling argument to deal with racial differences we all recognize, yet pretend not to notice.

Zyklop
Saturday, November 20th, 2004, 02:38 PM
Die Ahnen ~ Gustav Freytag

Alkman
Saturday, November 20th, 2004, 02:54 PM
Princess Kasamassima-Henry James
One of the most boring books i've ever read i must say

WarMaiden
Monday, November 22nd, 2004, 12:18 AM
I've now started to read...

A Dublin Girl: Growing Up in the 1930s

Growing up in a one-room tenement with her parents and two siblings, Elaine Crowley became a shrewd observer: of the neighborhood within the Liberties, of street life, of poverty, of her father's infidelity, and of her mother's effort to end his affair. Her memories create a moving portrait of a 1930s Irish family contending with the pain of adversity and loss, and how love can overcome both.

"[A] wonderful memoir filled with the sights, sounds, and smells of a Dublin that is gone forever."
--The Boston Globe

"A counterpoint to Angela's Ashes from a young Irish girl... Rich with warmth and caring... tenderness and grace."
--The Chicago Tribune

Jack
Monday, December 6th, 2004, 06:29 AM
The Anatomy of Fascism - Robert O. Paxton
Being and Time - Martin Heidegger
A Thousand Plateaus - Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari
Understanding Deleuze - Claire Colebrook

Joe000
Monday, December 6th, 2004, 06:44 AM
Iliad - Homer

SiegUmJedenPreis
Monday, December 6th, 2004, 09:49 AM
The Prophesies of Boer Prophet - Siener van Rensburg

The Republic - Plato

the_tsar_21
Monday, December 6th, 2004, 11:39 PM
The Twilight of Democracy - Patrick Kennon
Imperial Hubris - Anonymous / Michael Scheuer
Onward Muslim Soldiers - Robert Spencer
Mediterranean Winter - Robert D. Kaplan
Hitler's Scientists - John Cornwell
Civilization and Its Enemies - Lee Harris
Intelligence in War - John Keegan
The Condor Years - John Dinges

:hveðrungur:
Monday, December 6th, 2004, 11:46 PM
"Temple of Wotan" by Ron McVan

and

"Hammer Of The North" by Magnus Magnusson

:)

friedrich braun
Tuesday, December 7th, 2004, 07:18 PM
I just ordered the following books:


Foundations of the Nineteenth Century. a Translation From the German By John Lees...With an Introduction By Lord Redesdale. Volume 2.
by Houston Stewart Chamberlain. hardcover F. Bruckmann, A. G., München 1911 Elibron Classics, 2000. This book is an Elibron Classics reprint. Hardcover. New. 592 pages. Originally published by F. Bruckmann, A. G., München, 1911. Full title: Houston Stewart Chamberlain. Foundations of the Nineteenth Century. A translation from the German by John Lees...With an introduction by Lord Redesdale. Volume 2 This Elibron Classics title is also available as a paperback.
Ships from independent seller

Foundations of the Nineteenth Century. a Translation From the German By John Lees...With an Introduction By Lord Redesdale. Volume 1.
by Houston Stewart Chamberlain. paperback F. Bruckmann, A. G., München 1911 Elibron Classics, 2000. This book is an Elibron Classics reprint. Paperback. New. 684 pages. Originally published by F. Bruckmann, A. G., München, 1911. Full title: Houston Stewart Chamberlain. Foundations of the Nineteenth Century. A translation from the German by John Lees...With an introduction by Lord Redesdale. Volume 1 This Elibron Classics title is also available as a hardcover.
Ships from independent seller

Men Among the Ruins: Post-War Reflections of a Radical Traditionalist.
by Julius Evola; Guido Stucco; Michael Moynihan; Joscelyn Godwin. PAPERBACK Inner Traditions Intl Ltd Very Good 0892819057 Paperback. Clean pages, no marks. All used books cleaned individually. Fast. Great Gift. s on multiple orders. Great gift.
Ships from independent seller

Revolt Against the Modern World.
by Evola, Julius. Octavo. Cloth in yellow dust jacket. 1st U.S. Edition. Inner Traditions International (1995) Fine condition with fine jacket in protective mylar wrapper. -f16.
Ships from independent seller

The Forced War: When Peaceful Revision Failed
by Hoggan, David First Inst. Hist. Review 1989 Very Good+/Very Good+ dj; great copy 716
Ships from independent seller

jcs
Tuesday, December 7th, 2004, 08:15 PM
Men Among the Ruins: Post-War Reflections of a Radical Traditionalist.
by Julius Evola; Guido Stucco; Michael Moynihan; Joscelyn Godwin. PAPERBACK Inner Traditions Intl Ltd Very Good 0892819057 Paperback. Clean pages, no marks. All used books cleaned individually. Fast. Great Gift. s on multiple orders. Great gift.
Ships from independent seller

Revolt Against the Modern World.
by Evola, Julius. Octavo. Cloth in yellow dust jacket. 1st U.S. Edition. Inner Traditions International (1995) Fine condition with fine jacket in protective mylar wrapper. -f16.
Ships from independent seller
Wonderful books.

I recently ordered:

Meditations at the Peaks by Julius Evola

Mystery of the Grail by Julius Evola

Faust I and II by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (read it many times before. I needed a new copy)

Study of Counterpoint by J.J. Fux

Selected Writings (Penguin Classics) by Meister Eckhart

Gods and Myths of Northern Europe by H.R. Ellis Davidson

At the moment, I am currently reading the The Decline of the West by Oswald Spengler.

Stig NHF
Tuesday, December 7th, 2004, 08:55 PM
"Hitlers War" by David Irving.
"Which way Western Man?" by William Gayley Simpson
"Fuglane" by Tarjei Vesaas
"Wenn Alle Brüder Schweigen" by Paul Hausser
and a ton of school-related history-books and a lot of Norwegian books you haven't heard about :cool:

NSFreja
Tuesday, December 7th, 2004, 09:13 PM
Ich diene by Karl Heinz Mathias
Clausewitz on strategy by Ghyczy, Oetinger and Bassford
/M

Eikþyrnir
Sunday, December 12th, 2004, 12:33 AM
Hervarar Saga og Heiðreks

Frans_Jozef
Sunday, December 12th, 2004, 10:41 PM
S.R. Steinmetz, J.A.J. Barge, A.L. Hagedoorn & R. Steinmetz, De Rassen der Menschheid: Wording, Strijd en Toekomst.

Stephen Oppenheimer, Out of Eden: The peopling of the world.

Elaine Morgen, Sporen van de evolutie. (Orig. title: The Scars of Evolution)

Phlegethon
Sunday, December 12th, 2004, 10:58 PM
Reinhard Liehr/Günther Maihold/Günter Vollmer (Hrsg.): Ein Institut und sein General. Wilhelm Faupel und das Ibero-Amerikanische Institut in der Zeit des Nationalsozialismus, Frankfurt am Main 2003

Reinhard Liehr/Günther Maihold/Günter Vollmer (Ed.): An Institute and Its General: Wilhelm Faupel and the Ibero-American Institute in the Time of National Socialism, Frankfurt on Main 2003

Oskorei
Sunday, December 12th, 2004, 11:11 PM
The Hermetic Tradition, Julius Evola

Siegfried
Sunday, December 12th, 2004, 11:30 PM
The Open Society and Its Enemies - Karl Popper

Folkvang
Monday, December 13th, 2004, 08:10 AM
I just finished reading "Waffen SS" by John Keegan. Good book, fairly objective. Further related-topic books on my list include, but are not limited to, "Hitler" by... damn, I forget who, but nevermind. "Das Reich", and "The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich". I'm also reading a fascinating book called "The Alphabet Versus the Goddess", by Leonard Shlain, which details the evolution of the human mind.

Out of curiosity, has anyone read a book by Henry Myers, "The Utmost Island"? It's a tragic story about vikings and the discovery of Vinland. Easy read, but very mythologically/historically accurate. It was written around 1950. I suggest it to anyone interested in that genre.

Naggaroth
Monday, December 13th, 2004, 02:10 PM
Just finished reading gymnasium teacher Pedersens story... From Dag Solstad. It's about a political party (AKP-ml) which was big here in Norway during the 70's. They are also making a movie of the book. And I wonder how that movie will be.

friedrich braun
Monday, December 13th, 2004, 08:35 PM
Forgotten Fatherland: The Search for Elisabeth Nietzsche
by Macintyre, Ben

About this title: In 1886 Elisabeth Nietzsche, sister of the famous philosopher, and friend of Richard Wagner, traveled with her husband, Bernhard Forster, and a select group of blond-haired, blue-eyed Germans to the remote Paraguayan wilderness to found an Aryan colony she called Nueva Germania. In Forgotten Fatherland Ben Macintyre tracks down the descendants of this early racial experiment, still living in Nueva Germania and breeding among themselves. Many have maintained the language, customs, and ideals that first brought their ancestors over from Europe more than one hundred years ago. But Elisabeth Nietzsche's story does not end in Paraguay. A supremely dominating woman, she returned to Europe to take control of both her brother and his work until his death, and beyond. It was she who largely wrote Nietzsche's posthumous "masterwork", The Will to Power; invested Nietzsche with her own proto-Nazi views; and invented and organized the semi-mythical cult of his philosophy, projecting it into the new order emerging in war-torn Europe. Admirer of Mussolini, mentor to Hitler, she died just before the outbreak of the Second World War and was given a full Nazi funeral, attended by a tearful Fuhrer. Forgotten Fatherland re-creates the bizarre history and atmosphere of Nueva Germania, and contains startling revelations about the last days of Josef Mengele. A remarkable work of investigative journalism, shot through with Waughian wit, Forgotten Fatherland will necessitate major reevaluations of the life and posthumous reputation of one of the most influential thinkers of the nineteenth century, and provides an illuminating portrait of a woman whose influence on the history of the twentieth century can onlynow be fully understood.
Note: The synopsis above is drawn from available information about this title. Details about specific copies and editions for sale are in the listings displayed below.

anti-climacus
Monday, December 13th, 2004, 09:24 PM
ludwig wittgenstein - culture and value
robinson jeffers - collected poems
edmund burke - reflections on the revolution in france
essays by jim kalb and writings by norman lowell

Siegfried
Monday, December 13th, 2004, 10:20 PM
After the King
About 20 short fantasy stories by different authors, in honor of Tolkien. Some of them are pretty good, others are close to crap, imho.

PsycholgclMishap
Monday, December 13th, 2004, 10:59 PM
"FRIDA."

A coffee table biography and picture book about the life and art of Frida Kahlo.

Taras Bulba
Tuesday, December 14th, 2004, 10:34 PM
History of Ukraine by Mikhailo Hrushevsky

And random items concerning Catholic political theories(questions concerning Monarchy, Corporatism, etc.).

Gesta Bellica
Tuesday, December 14th, 2004, 11:04 PM
"La Massoneria - la storia, gli uomini, le idee (The Masonry - history, men and ideas)" Zefiro Ciufoletti & Sergio Moravia
"L'italia e i suoi invasori (Italy and its Invaders)" Girolamo Arnaldi

Dr. Brandt
Thursday, December 16th, 2004, 04:33 AM
[B]Forgotten Fatherland re-creates the bizarre history and atmosphere of Nueva Germania, and contains startling revelations about the last days of Josef Mengele. A remarkable work of investigative journalism, shot through with Waughian wit, Forgotten Fatherland will necessitate major reevaluations of the life and posthumous reputation of one of the most influential thinkers of the nineteenth century, and provides an illuminating portrait of a woman whose influence on the history of the twentieth century can onlynow be fully understood.
Note: The synopsis above is drawn from available information about this title. Details about specific copies and editions for sale are in the listings displayed below.

Oh yes! they showed a BBC film about her several years ago, called "The sister - the story of a forger."

Her husband bernhard Förster was a rabid antisemite and Nietzsche detested him. They also showed some footage of Nueva Germania and spoke to an old lady who was a young girl during 1933. They live there like the peasants of 19th century Germany. (Almost like the Amish). Very race aware. Dr. Mengele was there also. they also played a recording of him SINGING the old Volksong "Oh du mein altes Wien" (Oh you my old Vienna) while playing on the piano. That song made me break into tears. you could literly hear out of his voice how homesick he was. I think that was the worst punishment for a person like him, not being able to live in his Fatherland.
The old Lady also made som degoratory remarks about Indios, that they are lazy and don't enjoy work like the Germans. she also admitted that they face a great problem. Interbreeding. She said the few families here will breed themselves out of extincion one of these days because it will turn incestious if no new blood settles there.

Frans_Jozef
Saturday, December 18th, 2004, 02:23 AM
Lars Svendsen, Filosofie van de verveling.

- -> A Philosophy of Boredom:
http://www.reaktionbooks.co.uk/titles/non_boredom.html

FadeTheButcher
Saturday, December 18th, 2004, 01:59 PM
The Eagle and the Rising Sun: The Japanese-American War, 1941-1943 (2004)
by Alan Schom

Making Friends with Hitler: Lord Londonderry, the Nazis and the Road to World War II (2004)
by Ian Kershaw

Grand Delusion: Stalin and the German Invasion of Russia (1999)
by Gabriel Gorodetesky

Britannia's Children: Emigration from England, Scotland, Wales and Ireland since 1600 (2004)
by Eric Richards

The Anglo-American Establishment, From Rhodes to Cliveden (1981)
Carrol Quigley

k0nsl
Saturday, December 18th, 2004, 03:12 PM
Adolf Hitler (1976)
by John Toland

Be careful with Toland, don't buy the abridged version, the full book is 1035 pages long, you can get it from abebooks for about 3 bucks, unabridged, always look at the number of pages, or ask. Usually it's about 40 dollars.

(http://dogbert.abebooks.com/servlet/BookDetailsPL?bi=338134318)

-k0nsl

Siegfried
Sunday, December 19th, 2004, 02:54 PM
The Meditations - Emperor Marcus Aurelius Antoninus

Siegfried
Sunday, December 19th, 2004, 03:02 PM
The Meditations - Emperor Marcus Aurelius Antoninus

Joe000
Friday, December 31st, 2004, 04:00 AM
Sophocles - Oedipus the King

QuietWind
Saturday, January 1st, 2005, 03:34 AM
I have not read that one, but......

I am currently reading "Lost Civilisations of the Stone Age" by Richard Rudgley. (see the wonderful quote I found in my signature?) Anyway, I started reading it a couple of months ago, and I am on about the second or third chapter. This is my second time reading the first couple of chapters! No, I am not slow or dumb, it's just a habit I think I am forming with this book. It is a very very good book. I read some, then I stop and take time to digest/ incubate it. Then I go back and reread again and get a little farther than the first time. :lol So next time, I will probably start it, and read through the fourth chapter! :D Maybe by next year I will get it read.

:hveðrungur:
Saturday, January 1st, 2005, 04:52 AM
http://i.b5z.net/i/u/758298/i/TOWfront.JPG

"Temple of Wotan - The Holy Book of the Aryan Tribes" - By Ron McVan


The mystical and essential foundation, practice and philosophy of Wotanism, which includes the full cycle of sacred ceremonies and rites, the Havamal, runes, art, poetry and C.G.Jung's Essay on Wotan. Authored and Illustrated by Ron McVan. Foreword by Miguel Serrano. 400 pages.

AngryPotato
Sunday, January 9th, 2005, 11:01 PM
I am currently reading "Lost Civilisations of the Stone Age" by Richard Rudgley.

Just ordered that. Will hopefully be an interesting read.
:D

QuietWind
Monday, January 10th, 2005, 02:03 AM
Just ordered that. Will hopefully be an interesting read.
:D
It is very interesting and contains theories I have not heard before. It also talks about liguistics which is interesting. After you get it and read it, let me know what you think. Maybe if you are more anthropologically/ liguistically wise on these things than I am, I can ask you some of my questions. :lol

FadeTheButcher
Thursday, February 3rd, 2005, 09:45 PM
I am doing some research right now on the American entry into WW2. Too much of the discussion that goes on here focuses on the Axis as opposed to the Allies.

Roosevelt Confronts Hitler: America's Entry into World War II (1987)
by Patrick T. Hearden

The Conquerers: Roosevelt, Truman and the Destruction of Hitler's Germany, 1941-1945 (2002)
by Michael R. Beschloss

Roosevelt and Hitler: Prelude to War (1989)
by Robert Herzstein

From Munich to Pearl Harbor: Roosevelt's America and the Origins of the Second World War (2002)
by David Reynolds

Franklin D. Roosevelt and American Foreign Policy, 1932-1945 (1995)
by Robert Dallek

I am about halfway through my bio of Roosevelt right now. Its close to 1300 pages long.

Franklin Delano Roosevelt: Champion of Freedom (2004)
by Conrad Black

jcs
Thursday, February 3rd, 2005, 09:51 PM
Too much of the discussion that goes on here focuses on the Axis as opposed to the Allies.
Which balances out the fact that all discussion that most of us hear outside of the forum focuses entirely on the Allies.
Truth is of primary importance, however, not perspective.

I am currently studying the Indo-Europeans:

Aryan Race [1888] by Morris

In Search of the Indo-Europeans by Mallory

How to Kill a Dragon by Watkins

FadeTheButcher
Thursday, February 3rd, 2005, 10:00 PM
Which balances out the fact that all discussion that most of us hear outside of the forum focuses entirely on the Allies.Its important to have a thorough understanding of both sides in the conflict. The discussion that goes on about WW2 on racialist websites mostly concerns the Axis powers and tends to be heavily biased. A lot of it is also pseudoscholarship that gets posted on the web too.

friedrich braun
Thursday, February 3rd, 2005, 10:24 PM
Those who haven't read David L. Hoggan's The Forced War: When Peaceful Revisionism Failed and AJP Taylor's The Origins of the Second World War are akin to the judge who came to court to hear the case after having only read the prosecution's briefs.

I cannot emphasise the importance of Hoggan's work enough.



David Leslie Hoggan, author of The Forced War and other works, was born in Portland, Oregon, on March 23, 1923. After study at Reed College in Portland, he went to Harvard University, where in 1948 he earned a Ph.D. in history for his dissertation on German-Polish relations in 1938-1939.

After Harvard Hoggan taught and studied at the Amerika Institut of the University of Munich (1949-1952), the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the University of California at Berkeley, San Francisco State College, and Carthage Lutheran College in Illinois.

In 1955 he came into contact with Harry Elmer Barnes, who encouraged Hoggan to expand his Harvard dissertation into The Forced War, and obtained the financial assistance necessary for this undertaking. However, disagreement between Barnes and Hoggan about some citations in the work resulted in a decision by the scheduled publisher, Devin-Adair, to withdraw from the project. It was finally published in 1989 by the IHR under the title The Forced War: Why Peaceful Revision Failed.

Despite his objections on minor points, Barnes characterized The Forced War in these words: "In its present form, it not only constitutes the first thorough study of the responsibility for the causes of the Second World War in any language, but is likely to remain the definitive revisionist work on this subject for many years."

The Forced War compliments The Origins of The Second World War, the best-selling non-conformist examination of the conflict by the brilliant British historian A. J. P. Taylor. But in contrast to virtually every other work on this subject, Hoggan's study made extensive use of Polish sources. Also in contrast to Taylor and others, Hoggan closely examined the oppression of Poland's ethnic German minority, which was an important factor in Hitler's decision to go to war against the Polish state.

Hoggan's detailed study was published in Germany in 1961 by Grabert Verlag (Tübingen) under the title Der Erzwungene Krieg. It generated prompt and wide attention. The well-known conservative writer Armin Mohler declared that the work had brought World War II revisionism "out of the ghetto" in Germany. The work was predictably attacked by West Germany's historical establishment, for example in a lengthy 1964 front-cover article in the influential weekly Der Spiegel. Over the years Der Erzwungene Krieg has gone through at least 13 printings, and sold more than 50,000 copies.

Several of Dr. Hoggan's historical writings have appeared only in German, including Frankreichs Widerstand gegen den Zweiten Weltkrieg ("France's Resistance Against the Second World War"), published by Grabert in 1963, Der unnötige Krieg ("The Unnecessary War"), published in 1976, and the two-part book, Das blinde Jahrhundert ("The Blind Century"), consisting of Amerika -- das messianische Unheil ("America: The Messianic Disaster"), which appeared in 1979, and Europa -- Die verlorene Weltmitte ("Europe: The Lost World Center"), published in 1984. Meine Anmerkungen zu Deutschland: Der Anglo-amerikanische Kreuzzugsgedanke im 20. Jahrhundert ("My Thoughts on Germany: The Anglo-American Crusade Mentality in the 20th Century") appeared posthumously in 1990.

Hoggan's English-language study, The Myth of the ‘New History, (1965 and 1985), earned praise from Revilo Oliver as "an important and very valuable book ... ably written ... admirably short and to the point ..."

Hoggan's lecture at the IHR's Sixth Conference in 1985, "Plato's Dialectic v. Hegel and Marx," appeared in the spring 1986 issue of The Journal of Historical Review. The Ninth IHR Conference, 1989, was dedicated to his memory.

During his final years David Hoggan lived with his wife in Menlo Park, northern California. He died there of a heart attack on August 7, 1988.
http://www.revisionists.com/revisionists/hoggan.html

k0nsl
Friday, February 4th, 2005, 04:43 AM
Lieber ein Ende mit Schrecken als Schrecken ohne Ende.
That quote "we want war" is taken seriously I believe by AJP Taylor, I don't trust that guy. I think it was him.

-k0nsl

Draugr
Friday, February 4th, 2005, 05:58 AM
The Aeneid in Latin prepared by Clyde Pharr
Herodotus' The Histories by Herodotus (of course!)
Lysias' In Defense the Murder of Eratosenous by Lysias in the original Attic Greek.

Franco_
Friday, February 4th, 2005, 06:05 AM
I am doing some research right now on the American entry into WW2. Too much of the discussion that goes on here focuses on the Axis as opposed to the Allies.

Roosevelt Confronts Hitler: America's Entry into World War II (1987)
by Patrick T. Hearden

The Conquerers: Roosevelt, Truman and the Destruction of Hitler's Germany, 1941-1945 (2002)
by Michael R. Beschloss

Roosevelt and Hitler: Prelude to War (1989)
by Robert Herzstein

From Munich to Pearl Harbor: Roosevelt's America and the Origins of the Second World War (2002)
by David Reynolds

Franklin D. Roosevelt and American Foreign Policy, 1932-1945 (1995)
by Robert Dallek

I am about halfway through my bio of Roosevelt right now. Its close to 1300 pages long.

Franklin Delano Roosevelt: Champion of Freedom (2004)
by Conrad Black


Are you fond of reading about the crippled commie-pal FDR?



---------

friedrich braun
Friday, February 4th, 2005, 06:06 AM
Taylor is mostly useful in establishing the following points:

1) Hitler didn't want war (and war was not something he planned until the last minute when it was obvious that the Poles wouldn't be reasonable on either Danzig or the Prussian corridor, despite his very generous offers of 1938), but he wasn't going to stand back and watch Poles mistreat Danzingers while refusing to come to an arrangement concerning that ancient German city and the economically vital Prussian corridor.

2) Lord Halifax was hellbent on destroying NS Germany in the name of the obsolete British balance of power policy.

3) The Brits wanted war and actually discourages the Poles to come to any sort of terms with Germany (see also their blank cheque as guarantee). Poland was only a pretext and the eventual fate of Poles and Poland was of no importance to the Brits.

4) Hitler was only interested in moving East and was willing to guarantee the British Empire in its entirety, if Britain came to a mutually beneficial understanding with Germany.

5) Hitler's whole focus and modus operandi was predicated on undoing the most egregious outcomes of the anti-Geman Versailles Treaty.

I could go on, but it's late...


Lieber ein Ende mit Schrecken als Schrecken ohne Ende.
That quote "we want war" is taken seriously I believe by AJP Taylor, I don't trust that guy. I think it was him.

-k0nsl

Franco_
Friday, February 4th, 2005, 06:09 AM
Its important to have a thorough understanding of both sides in the conflict. The discussion that goes on about WW2 on racialist websites mostly concerns the Axis powers and tends to be heavily biased. A lot of it is also pseudoscholarship that gets posted on the web too.


And various "mainstream" books that make various "gas-chamber" claims about the Auschwitz concentration camp aren't biased??



-------

friedrich braun
Friday, February 4th, 2005, 06:15 AM
No, only that material that deviates from the standard narrative of portraying Hitler as an unhinged world conqueror and mad warmonger and the Allies as angelic sweethearts is biased. Any sense of balance in reporting is automatically dismissed as "Nazi trash of the Internet."

Why do you bother, Franco?

Draugr
Friday, February 4th, 2005, 06:35 AM
Considering the guy calls himself C. Caligula how much sense can he make?

Northern Paladin
Friday, February 4th, 2005, 07:14 AM
Evolutionary Biology and Heritable Traits by Phillipe Rushton.

And Swedish Mentality by Ake Daun.

Eiserner Adler
Friday, February 4th, 2005, 02:02 PM
Reading Barbarossa by Alan Clarke at work and in just a little bit I will read Bolshevism from Moses to Lenin by Dietrich Eckhardt for the first time (only 89 pages, about 2 hours). Then I will start Hunter (read The Turner Diaries for the first time last summer) by Dr. William L. Pierce aka Andrew MacDonald as my next read at home book (not goeing to take that one into work). My next at work book will be FDR's Folly by Jim Powell. I also recently bought Which Way Western Man by William Gayley Simpson (1100 pages) and am rereading The Jewish Strategy by Dr. Revilo P. Oliver a few pages at a time here and there, also I skim through sections of On War by Clausewitz from time to time.

Every time I go to even huge two story bookstores looking for stuff on ancient or medevil German history, the German section is 99% anti 'Nazi' crap. I'm goeing to stick to national vanguard books and a few other pro white online bookstores from now on. One thing I've always been looking for is Otto von Bismarck's personal memoirs (not sure what they are officially called) that he wrote after his dismissal. Anyone know if they were ever even publicly published and if so where they can be obtained?

friedrich braun
Friday, February 4th, 2005, 02:11 PM
Failure of a Mission, Berlin 1937-1939

Sir Neville Henderson was the last British ambassador to Germany before the outbreak of World War II.

Although I haven't read the book yet, David Irving cites it as the work which had the most profound effect on him in determing that Halifax's Britain was at all cost determined to have war with Hitler.


"... the last British ambassador to Germany before the outbreak of World War II.

Henderson joins the diplomatic service in 1905 and serves as Minister in Egypt (1924-28), France (1928-29), and Yugoslavia (1929-35). He then serves as British ambassador to Argentina (1935-37) and finally as ambassador to Germany (1937-39). In Berlin, he works under severe nervous strain and becomes seriously ill during the Winter of 1938.

Henderson opposes France's European policy after World War I and empathizes with Hitler's territorial claims. He believes that neither he himself nor his government have any business condemning German foreign policy while he represents Britain in Germany. He is friendly with several Nazi leaders, especially Reich Air Minister Hermann Goering whose friendship he cultivates.

The Conspiracy

Because he so favored appeasing Hitler, and owing to his close personal friendship with key Nazi leaders like Goering, Henderson was of no use to the German conspirators trying to enlist British support for their 1938 attempt to overthrow Hitler and the Nazi regime. Having been approached by the conspirators all the same, his reaction was to label them as traitors to their country whom Britain should not acknowledge. The British Foreign Office itself was of the same mind.

Actually, the so-called conspiracy of 1938 only involved a handful of traitorous officers and had no wide support whatsoever.

Lena_rus
Friday, February 4th, 2005, 02:32 PM
Possession - A.S. Byatt
Maskerade - Terry Pratchett :rofl:

Mistress Klaus
Friday, February 4th, 2005, 02:33 PM
'The World According to Garp' by John Irving.
(It is already starting to annoy me....3 quarters through)

FadeTheButcher
Friday, February 4th, 2005, 03:06 PM
Are you fond of reading about the crippled commie-pal FDR?
The idea that FDR was a Communist is preposterous. He often pointed out that he was the best friend business ever had in America. He saved capitalism.

Eiserner Adler
Friday, February 4th, 2005, 03:12 PM
The idea that FDR was a Communist is preposterous. He often pointed out that he was the best friend business ever had in America. He saved capitalism.

You should read FDR's Folly by Jim Powell, all about his New Deal economic policies and how they prolonged the Great Depression.

FadeTheButcher
Friday, February 4th, 2005, 03:25 PM
You should read FDR's Folly by Jim Powell, all about his New Deal economic policies and how they prolonged the Great Depression.I saw that book at the library last night. But I had already picked up too many other titles so I didn't check it out. Right now I am focusing on American foreign policy during the Roosevelt administration, not the New Deal. Its on my too read list though. Here are the books I checked out yesterday.

The Dictators: Hitler's Germany and Stalin's Russia (2004)
by Richard Overy

Roosevelt and the Isolationists, 1932-1945 (1983)
by Wayne S. Cole

Franklin D. Roosevelt and the Formation of the Modern World (2003)
Edited by Thomas C. Howard and William D. Peterson

Storm on the Horizon: The Challenge to American Intervention, 1939-1941 (2000)
by Justus D. Doenecke

FDR: Into the Storm, 1937-1940, A History (1993)
by Kenneth S. Davis

Blutwölfin
Tuesday, February 8th, 2005, 06:46 AM
Paul Herrmann - Nordische Mythologie
Edmund von Hollander - Vatan

Odin Biggles
Wednesday, February 9th, 2005, 03:47 AM
I have been reading a Tom Clancy novel called "Red Storm Rising" since November last year, 200 pages to go :).

Siegfried
Wednesday, February 9th, 2005, 09:48 AM
...my e-mail.

Midtown Bootboy
Wednesday, February 9th, 2005, 03:54 PM
Currently, I'm reading James Clavell's Shogun.

WarMaiden
Thursday, February 10th, 2005, 09:33 PM
I'm starting on.. Ostara: Customs, Spells & Rituals for the Rites of Spring

http://images.amazon.com/images/P/0738700827.01.LZZZZZZZ.jpg

Oskorei
Saturday, February 19th, 2005, 11:39 PM
A Confederacy of Dunces - John Kennedy Toole

A great book, about the fat and lazy Ignatius T. Reilly, and his very comic crusade against the modern world. The writer only wrote this one book before he commited suicide, but in it his love for his native New Orleans is obvious. We follow the huge Ignatius trying to get a job, and keep it, while he preaches against the lack of geometry and theology in the modern world. A must-read, especially for any Traditionalist ;)

:pread:

Nightmare_Gbg
Saturday, February 19th, 2005, 11:50 PM
I just finnished The daVinci code.

Kräuterhexe
Saturday, February 19th, 2005, 11:57 PM
Arz Helmut and Heinz Kathrien - Sächsische Volksmärchen aus Siebenbürgen

swaltonb
Wednesday, February 23rd, 2005, 12:23 AM
I've been reading alot of Gunther Grass. His newest book is "Crabwalk" and , like his others , is anti-National Socialism. However , he's a great writer and the book is about a little known German navel tragedy during WWII. If you can ignore the"anti"message it's quite a story.

Joe000
Wednesday, February 23rd, 2005, 07:23 AM
Solon and Croesus: and other Greek Essays by Alfred Zimmern.

Theudanaz
Wednesday, February 23rd, 2005, 07:38 AM
Cervantes: Don Quixote.

Taking forever...:)

Siegfried
Wednesday, February 23rd, 2005, 09:53 AM
Growth of the Soil - Knut Hamsun

http://forums.skadi.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=31425&stc=1

Siegfried
Wednesday, February 23rd, 2005, 10:36 AM
Growth of the Soil - Knut Hamsun

Frans_Jozef
Wednesday, February 23rd, 2005, 12:00 PM
Frances Lynch, Stephen Aldhouse-Green and Jeffrey L. Davies, Prehistoric Wales

C.Loring Brace, Evolution in an Anthropological View