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Loki
Friday, August 29th, 2003, 10:14 AM
It didn't take me long to figure out that there was a huge similarity between the distribution of Protestantism and the prevalence of the Nordic race in Europe. Of course there are some exceptions, but the rule is that Nordic/Germanic = Protestant.

Anyone else ever noticed this? Could it have something to do with Gustavus Adolphus' strong influence in the north during the Thirty Years War, or the strong Spanish influence to the south?

OnionPeeler
Friday, August 29th, 2003, 11:25 AM
For some reason, historians recoil from this. It seems obvious to me.

If you look at the Germanic language frontier and compare it to the schism, there is a close correspondence. Those 'contact' areas are where exception is noted. Protestantism made a strong, but failed bid in France and Catholicism triumphed in southern Germany.

The Kelts split with Scotland leaving and Ireland keeping the Pope.

The Slavs are mostly irrelevant in this episode, except the Poles who remained Catholic.

Milesian
Friday, August 29th, 2003, 12:49 PM
I think it mostly stems from politics more than anything.
After the Reformation, many princes and soverigns chose their allegance (loyal to Rome or breaking with Rome) depending on their positions at the time. For those who considered it advantageous to remain intimate with Rome, they tended to do so. The opposite was also true of those who perhaps seen their rivals favoured at the Pope's court.

I think for many places, real religious conviction had suprisingly little to do with the decision and was more bound up in the politics and power-struggles of that particular era.
However, I agree there does seem to be a correlation between some of the Germanic people's and Protestantism (in a genral way of course as Protestants can be found in Catholic countries and vice versa)

Frans_Jozef
Friday, August 29th, 2003, 02:26 PM
It didn't take me long to figure out that there was a huge similarity between the distribution of Protestantism and the prevalence of the Nordic race in Europe. Of course there are some exceptions, but the rule is that Nordic/Germanic = Protestant.

Anyone else ever noticed this? Could it have something to do with Gustavus Adolphus' strong influence in the north during the Thirty Years War, or the strong Spanish influence to the south?

There's much more correlation in the way faith is embraced and experience according to the "Seele" of a given race.
Some of the most zealously and ardent protestant regions in the Netherlands, Saxo-Frisian territory like Groningen or Overijssel, were the least prone to give up Catholicism during the Reformation, once however Protestantism took firm hold, these people demonstrated the same "Verharrung" in their new beliefs and customs as before; a certain incapacity to live more freely and in the spirit and by meditation and rational reflection of one's religion in stead of strictly by the rule, contained, fundamentalistic, which is the typical expression of the Faelid mind.

Nordgau
Saturday, August 30th, 2003, 10:55 PM
[...] "Seele" [...] "Verharrung" [...]

Man spricht deutsch? :D

The certain covering of Protestantism and Nordic race is often mentioned and discussed in race-psychological literature of the twenties and thirties. It's somehow as religious feeling "cool" and spröde (coy?) in its character, and as an expression of religious feeling it shows more how the Nordic soul imagines the relationship between the individuum and God: more the free mind that feels the divine power everywhere and in itself and without to much between it than the "Magical" feeling and ceremonies of original oriental Christianity.
Catholicism in Southern European countries e. g. is "warmer" than Northern European, stresses more the emotions and more an expression of the Mediterranean soul.

Not to speak of the Christianity of Negroes where the Negro soul truly expresses itself...

cosmocreator
Saturday, August 30th, 2003, 11:11 PM
Yet they, Catholicism and Protestantism and other Christianities, use the same book based around Semitic belief systems.

Louky
Wednesday, February 11th, 2004, 03:49 PM
I think it's a coincidence. Nordic countries are further from Rome, therefore were better positioned to resist the armies of the Popes. Also, a matter of pride was involved since the Popes tended to be Italians, not Germans, English, or Swedes.

Even after the Schism, the Lutheran and Anglican Churches still retained the form of the Roman Church.

Today, many racialists looking for pre-Christian religious roots adopt magical rituals and many gods. The Catholic Church had already accomodated the European soul as the Church was first Hellenized and then Germanized. Only in recent decades has the Catholic Church lost its appeal to the European soul by removing the artwork in churches, de-Canonizing some Saints, "forgetting" rituals that had a pagan root, like Blessing of the Animals, 'Charming' of the Plow, etc.

You don't often hear of Catholics having a personal patron Saint anymore, which I find regrettable, because of the private devotion it affords. Everyone is supposed to have no other God but Jesus, which makes everyone's spirituality the same. In traditional Catholicism are found Saints (gods) for gardeners, carpenters, scientists, etc.

It's the Protestants (and post-Vatican II Catholics) with their rejection of the paganism--the European root--that are spiritually Semitic.

I hear Protestants say Catholics aren't Christian and I think, "Praise the Saints! I don't have a wish to be a second class Jew."

berserkergrrl
Thursday, April 15th, 2004, 09:09 PM
My family that is from Germanic descent are Protestant but while my Danish family are Christians they also have heavily Pagan beliefs as well.:D

Heritage
Monday, December 6th, 2004, 02:42 AM
Protestant are most CERTANLY not semitic/jewish in their thinking or faith (american nutjobs excluded).

Elite
Saturday, November 5th, 2005, 01:44 PM
the pope now is a german

i was thiking of converting to another section tho do u think i shood convert to protestanuism?

Peter
Sunday, March 11th, 2007, 06:34 PM
Interesting chapter, The united Europe with a church hellenized and later with german elements is the better option. Europe and the Catholic Faith are complementary and important factors for us. Now with the declination of the Catholic Faith in Europe, there is a declination in Europe of everything, in addition Protestantism in Europe is dying too and more fastly.
Protestantism is too much semitic for me, and too much poor in christian elements.

Juge
Monday, October 6th, 2008, 12:22 AM
Protestant are most CERTANLY not semitic/jewish in their thinking or faith (american nutjobs excluded).

Hey, quit telling the truth, I'm American and mad about that, just kidding.

Your right, the US Protestant denominations are so mainstream Judeo-Christian it's sick. Certain sects from immigration to 60 years ago claimed they were the Chosen people going to the real new Zion, forbade usury and a host of other OT forbiddens, of course time, money and politics gave way to a new order of thinking, and buried that history as far away as possible. I'm curious though, how conservative are the most conservative N.Europe Protestant churches?

TheGreatest
Monday, October 6th, 2008, 12:34 AM
Hey, quit telling the truth, I'm American and mad about that, just kidding.

Your right, the US Protestant denominations are so mainstream Judeo-Christian it's sick. Certain sects from immigration to 60 years ago claimed they were the Chosen people going to the real new Zion, forbade usury and a host of other OT forbiddens, of course time, money and politics gave way to a new order of thinking, and buried that history as far away as possible. I'm curious though, how conservative are the most conservative N.Europe Protestant churches?


My family is protestant and we stopped going to Church about 7 years ago. I think the Protestant Church in recent years has been echoing the Catholic Church and Mainstream propaganda. My Church was once bustling and now it's on the verge of collapsing because the minister is a moron.


I'm the real protestant. (That is how the name was invented, to protest the power of the Church). If my Pastor saw me on the street and threaten me to go to Church, then I'll blow him off. He does not speak for God.


I'm sick of the pushy people who inflitrate and run the Church. I don't feel gulity one bit by not entertaining these fools. I rather contemplate on my own time, then go to Church to hear the latest mixing propaganda or Gammicks to get me to donate 10 dollars to Muslims in Western Africa.



I think if a Christian identity church opened nearby then I might consider going. But the fact remains that most Churches have been usurped by pushy and powermongering jerks. It's ironic that the Protestants have become the people they very much seperated from in the first place

Jute
Monday, October 6th, 2008, 02:24 AM
I'm curious though, how conservative are the most conservative N.Europe Protestant churches?The Germanic countries of Europe all have Protestant state churches which are socially leftist (w/ high membership rates but low attendance rates. Those who attend are mostly conservative.) They also have small Protestant "free churches", and these are conservative and basically ethnonationalist without saying so.

There are small political parties based on these free-churches, and those are probably the ideologically-purest parties, from our point of view. Meaning, in the setting of a social decline, there is an infrastructure for healthy nationalist revival based on these free-churches. Similar to 1989-1990 in the DDR...the nationalist revival that brought down the communist government was basically spearheaded by free churches, and many of the major players were pastors.

Oswiu
Monday, October 6th, 2008, 02:54 AM
The Germanic countries of Europe all have Protestant state churches which are socially leftist (w/ high membership rates but low attendance rates. Those who attend are mostly conservative.) They also have small Protestant "free churches", and these are conservative and basically ethnonationalist without saying so.

I don't think that's the case in England, unfortunately. It seems to me at least that our Non-Conformist Churches are every bit as tied up with Establishment views as the Church of England. Possibly even more so. I have some sympathy for the Methodists but they are a bunch of do-gooding bleeding hearts at the end of the day.

In the Celtic countries the free churches are better off, but that's largely due to the language matter, and the absence of a serious foreign presence in their remote regions.

Imperator X
Tuesday, October 14th, 2008, 12:09 AM
Protestantism and the Nordic soul?! BAH!

Where would you rather go? To a little uninspiring wooden building or Notre Dame cathedral?

'Nuff said.

Let's drink to Rome, and ravish again!

[This is not an endorsement of the Latin church, merely a condemnation of spartan asceticism and uninspiring mediocrity.]

Angelcynn Beorn
Thursday, October 16th, 2008, 10:43 AM
Protestantism is more a refelection of the Nordic/Germanic view than anything else, which is why the correlation is so close. It emphasises the individals relationship with God, and a sense of independance and individualism that is inherant in all Germanic societies.

The Ashen Man
Thursday, October 1st, 2009, 05:42 AM
Hello all, my first post:

You may be interested in Frithjof Schuon's article The Question of Protestantism (http://www.worldwisdom.com/uploads/pdfs/52.pdf).


It could be said in a similar way that the Germanic soul—treated by Rome in too Latin a manner, though this is another question—which is neither Greek nor Roman, felt the need of a simpler and more inward religious archetype, one less formalistic and therefore more “popular” in the best sense of the word; this in certain respects is the archetype of Islam, a religion based on a Book and conferring priesthood upon every believer. At the same time and from another point of view, the Germanic soul had a nostalgia for a perspective that integrates the natural into the supernatural, that is, a perspective tending toward God without being against nature, a piety that is not monastic but accessible to every man of good will in the midst of earthly preoccupations, a way founded upon Grace and trust, not upon Justice and works; and this way incontestably has its premises in the Gospel itself.

Waldstein
Thursday, October 1st, 2009, 10:22 PM
The thread below might also be interesting regarding the subject matter:

http://forums.skadi.net/showthread.php?p=949140#post949140

Crazyhorse
Monday, December 28th, 2009, 12:17 PM
Protestantism is more a refelection of the Nordic/Germanic view than anything else, which is why the correlation is so close. It emphasises the individals relationship with God, and a sense of independance and individualism that is inherant in all Germanic societies.

I agree with this statement given the nature of the Scandanavian and Germanic Cultures of the North. Protestantism is a Christian expression of individual choice and connectivity with the Spiritual world; thus, another intellectual and religious expression of Germanic Culture. Protestantism and the Reformation of the Holy Church had heavy influences in "The Enlightenment" and the "Existentialist Movement" in the United States in 17th, 18th, and 19th Century respectively. Questioning authority under logical pretences and the fundamental desire to establish a personal relationship with a divine being is innately Northern Europe - might have something to do with the physical environment we descended from (cold, more isolated, more decentralized in nature). It's no wonder that those of us from the Nordid and Anglo-Saxon Cultures wrestle with the questions of faith in Christianity and the desire to learn more about our own indigineous religion - Asatru, Germanic Gods, etc... I grew up and am Southern Baptist. Technically, and by the doctrine, a Southern Baptist Minister should not and will not be able to definitively describe what Jesus supposedly looked like (doesn't matter based on the Faith Message) - more than likely, Southern Baptist Ministers will tell you that the common, accepted depiction of Jesus is a result of the Roman Catholic and Mediterreanean based artistic expressions of Rennaissance Painters (who based their concepts off the people of the Italian Penninsula during that time period) - Michaelangelo or Leonardo. There is a very strong connection between Traditional Protestant Expressions and the Native Northern European Religions such as Asatru; note I stated Expressions, not belief system or doctrine. Leaves me Schizophrenic at times - Christ's Cross around my neck and Thor's Hammer in my left pocket; never leave home without any of them (especially in my line of work) :thumbsup Just some concepts for thought.