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Vojvoda
Saturday, August 23rd, 2003, 06:54 AM
The figures on the left show how salt diffuses through a bathtub of water. In some respects the migration of people in prehistoric times owing to the spread of agriculture might be considered a diffusion- like process. The figures on the right show concentrations of farming settlements in 8000 BC, 5000 BC, and 1000 BC. The traces of this farming expansion can be seen today in the genetic structure of human populations, as well as in the common features of most of the languages spoken in Europe and Asia; their common ancestor was the Indo-European language spoken by the first farmers.

http://www.aip.org/physnews/graphics/images/diffusfn.gif

http://www.aip.org (http://www.aip.org)

Götterschicksal
Saturday, August 23rd, 2003, 09:11 AM
That image is wrong. The evidence of a plow was found in England dated 3500 b.c. and Spain around 3000 b.c. Agriculture spread two thousand years fast than that picture shows. Transition of Agriculture in europe happend before 3000 b.c. not 1000 b.c.

Vojvoda
Monday, August 25th, 2003, 02:25 AM
That image is wrong. The evidence of a plow was found in England dated 3500 b.c. and Spain around 3000 b.c. Agriculture spread two thousand years fast than that picture shows. Transition of Agriculture in europe happend before 3000 b.c. not 1000 b.c.

It may as well be wrong, I just thought it was interesting.

Frans_Jozef
Monday, August 25th, 2003, 09:53 AM
It may as well be wrong, I just thought it was interesting.

Actually, you can translate this map to every prehistoric migration you want and serve your purposes.
It can show the advancement of Skhull and Qahzeh Proto-Cromagnoids gradually entering from their Levantine homelands to Europe via the Eastern Mediterrenean or even further back in Time, about 800000BP with the arrival of Homo erectus, evolving into Home heidelbergensis, leading the way to the emergence of the Caucasoid race in situ in Europe.
As multiregionalist and ardent nativist, this "Frozen in Time" proposal suits me best, while someone else would frown by this argument and seek an explanation more recent on the timescale and digress in another theory.

Frans_Jozef
Thursday, March 23rd, 2006, 12:42 AM
Building a method for the study of the Mesolithic-Neolithic transition in Portugal

Mary Jackes, Christopher Meiklejohn

This paper focuses on the agricultural transition in Portugal and on demographic transition. It's argued that regional population continuity was in effect between 8000-6000 BP and suggests that Neolithic life-ways intensified on a slow rate and were essentially derivations from the late Mesolithic.

http://www.ualberta.ca/~mjackes/Ljubljana_ms.pdf