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Euclides
Wednesday, April 7th, 2004, 06:40 PM
Journal of Molecular Evolution
Publisher: Springer-Verlag New York
ISSN: 0022-2844 (Paper) 1432-1432 (Online)
Issue: Volume 42, Number 4

Date: April 1996
Pages: 472 - 475

Y-Chromosome DNA Haplotypes in Basques


G. Lucotte A1, S. Hazout A2

A1 International Institute of Anthropology, 1 Place d'Iéna, Paris 16ème, France
A2 Center of Computer Biosciences, INSERM Unity 263, Paris 7 University, 2 Place Jussieu, Paris 5ème, France

Y-Chromosome DNA Haplotypes in Basques


G. Lucotte A1, S. Hazout A2

A1 International Institute of Anthropology, 1 Place d'Iéna, Paris 16ème, France
A2 Center of Computer Biosciences, INSERM Unity 263, Paris 7 University, 2 Place Jussieu, Paris 5ème, France


Abstract:


Abstract. One Y-specific DNA polymorphism (p49/TaqI) was studied in a sample of 97 French Basques and compared with those found in 7 other French, Iberian, and Italian populations. A particularly high frequency (72.2%) of Y-haplotype XV was observed in Basques, compared to values (mean of 41%) obtained in other Western Europeans. Basques were also characterized by virtual absence, or presence at a low level, of the South or Near Eastern haplotypes XII, VII, and VIII. Considered together, these results confirm that Basques are a very ancient European population which has had little previous contact with the Neolithics.

Vetinari
Thursday, August 11th, 2005, 03:53 PM
Does anyone have access to the pdf version of this research paper:

The place of the Basques in the European Y-chromosome diversity landscape

If yes, could you please post it here?

morfrain_encilgar
Thursday, August 11th, 2005, 04:15 PM
Does anyone have access to the pdf version of this research paper:

The place of the Basques in the European Y-chromosome diversity landscape

If yes, could you please post it here?

I think I had before the computer broke, so if its on my internet archive Ill find it for you, Vetinari.

morfrain_encilgar
Thursday, August 11th, 2005, 04:18 PM
I think I had before the computer broke, so if its on my internet archive Ill find it for you, Vetinari.

Im sorry, I cant post it.

QuietWind
Friday, August 12th, 2005, 03:48 AM
If you can give me the complete reference, I could check my school library for it. The journal name, date, volume number, author, etc. would be helpful.

QuietWind
Saturday, August 13th, 2005, 02:01 AM
Is there another title? I tried google searching this one, in order to get the information I need, and nothing came up in the results. The ones that came up were:

http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/cgi-bin/resolve?id=doi:10.1086/316890&erFrom=3449817118359723032Guest

http://hpgl.stanford.edu/publications/EJHG_2004_v12_p855.pdf

http://www.oxfordancestors.com/papers/mtDNA04%20DNALandscape.pdf

http://www.oxfordancestors.com/papers/mtDNA03%20PolymorphismsInIraq.pdf

http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?artid=385092

http://www.le.ac.uk/genetics/maj4/JoblingTS.03.NRG.Review.pdf

http://www.agal-gz.org/portugaliza/numero01/celt.pdf

ETC. There are tons more that came up on this similar topic. You can search it yourself, or I can try and get the specific article if you know the reference info.

Vetinari
Monday, August 22nd, 2005, 08:47 PM
If you can give me the complete reference, I could check my school library for it. The journal name, date, volume number, author, etc. would be helpful.

Hi Jennifer,

This is all that I could find:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=16094307&query_hl=4

Eur J Hum Genet. 2005 Aug 10;

The place of the Basques in the European Y-chromosome diversity landscape.

Alonso S, Flores C, Cabrera V, Alonso A, Martin P, Albarran C, Izagirre N, de la Rua C, Garcia O.

1Dpto. Genetica, Antropologia Fisica y Fisiologia Animal, Fac. Ciencia y Tecnologia, UPV/EHU, Barrio Sarriena s/n 48940, Leioa, Bizkaia, Spain.

There is a trend to consider the gene pool of the Basques as a 'living fossil' of the earliest modern humans that colonized Europe. To investigate this assumption, we have typed 45 binary markers and five short tandem repeat loci of the Y chromosome in a set of 168 male Basques. Results on these combined haplotypes were analyzed in the context of matching data belonging to approximately 3000 individuals from over 20 European, Near East and North African populations, which were compiled from the literature. Our results place the low Y-chromosome diversity of Basques within the European diversity landscape. This low diversity seems to be the result of a lower effective population size maintained through generations. At least some lineages of Y chromosome in modern Basques originated and have been evolving since pre-Neolithic times. However, the strong genetic drift experienced by the Basques does not allow us to consider Basques either the only or the best representatives of the ancestral European gene pool. Contrary to previous suggestions, we do not observe any particular link between Basques and Celtic populations beyond that provided by the Paleolithic ancestry common to European populations, nor we find evidence supporting Basques as the focus of major population expansions.European Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 10 August 2005; doi:10.1038/sj.ejhg.5201482.

PMID: 16094307 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]


Thanks for any help that you can provide.