PDA

View Full Version : Allegiance to king disappears



Frans_Jozef
Tuesday, July 26th, 2005, 04:26 PM
Allegiance to king disappears

Sun 24/07/05 - In future Flemish civil servants will no longer have to swear an oath of allegiance to the king or queen of the Belgians. The Flemish Civil Service Minister Geert Bourgeois (Flemish independence party) plans to change the law.

http://www.vrtnieuws.net/html/nieuws/images/spacer.gif
Proposals to abandon the age old custom have already been approved by the Flemish cabinet.

The requirement for civil servants to swear allegiance to the king was introduced in 1831, months after Belgium was created.

But the times have changed: Belgium has become a federal country and Civil Service Minister Bourgeois believes it is no longer appropriate for his officials to swear an oath of allegiance to the king and Belgian laws.

In future Flemish civil servants will have to swear to uphold their office properly.

The draft legislation still needs to be approved by the Flemish parliament.

link (http://www.vrtnieuws.net/nieuwsnet_master/default/english/overzicht/050724_oath/index.html)

QuietWind
Wednesday, July 27th, 2005, 05:01 AM
I don't mean to sound ignorant here...... but is this viewed as a good or a bad thing in your country? Do people generally support this idea or think negatively about it? (To show how little I know about various governmental systems in Europe.....I never even knew you had a king? ) :D

Frans_Jozef
Wednesday, July 27th, 2005, 08:50 AM
I don't mean to sound ignorant here...... but is this viewed as a good or a bad thing in your country? Do people generally support this idea or think negatively about it? (To show how little I know about various governmental systems in Europe.....I never even knew you had a king? ) :D
Many Flemish agree in transfering more political, institutional competences to the regional states, however when it comes to the King and the Royal Family they switch off their sound judgement and as gullible children pledge their loyalty and love for a German dynasty, who never cared in 175 years that this Kingdom exists, an iota for Flanders, where the Flemish majority had to fight hard to have its culture and language recognized -it wasn't until 1930s that Flanders got its entirely Dutch-speaking university!-, and some members are reputiated to have been hostile towards the Flemish.

Till today, only a few members of this dynastic clan are able to talk correct Dutch and it usually sounds so trite, stammering and cautious as if they're not sure what to say to keep a conversation fluent and normal.

Todesritter
Wednesday, July 27th, 2005, 09:45 AM
I don't mean to sound ignorant here...... but is this viewed as a good or a bad thing in your country? Do people generally support this idea or think negatively about it? (To show how little I know about various governmental systems in Europe.....I never even knew you had a king? ) :D
Well, I would not feel bad about not knowing this, since as John Cleese "Declaration of Revocation" (http://forums.skadi.net/showthread.php?p=298833#post298833) points out 97.85% of Americans don't even know a country called Belgium exists, so you are ahead of the game. :D

:tthumbsup:guinness

Chlodovech
Saturday, July 30th, 2005, 01:23 AM
"I never even knew you had a king?" - Jennifer.

We have one. He showed his face only a few times this year, but always making a rather desperate stand in favor of the multicul. He doesn't know a darn thing about 'his' country, mainly because he has a lot of people around, who make him think we're all in love with him. Same story with his idiot son, the national laughing stock.

Maybe they're just puppets, but they're damaging our region too. :(

Aistulf
Saturday, July 30th, 2005, 03:38 AM
Great news! Even though it's a small step, it's one in the right direction. Down with those aristocratic multiculturalist traitors! :thumbup