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Isle-of-Skye
Wednesday, July 6th, 2005, 05:23 PM
Thanks all, for the bibliographies. Unfortunately, my journalism assignment has been switched today from writing about facial perception research to writing about how to make the transition to job sharing. For this research, my reading will take me away from online groups. :) Thanks again all, for your kindness.

Skye

QuietWind
Wednesday, July 6th, 2005, 07:16 PM
I'm doing research for a book I'm writing on whether or not science finds that the human brain is hard-wired to judge assymetry in faces due to the fact that assymetry is distant from the faces of most babies.

Anyone is welcome to volunteer a comment for my book on how you feel about various faces. My theory, based on scientific studies shown in videos, is that human brains are hard-wired to immediately like at first meeting a face that most resembles a cute baby's face. The characteristics humans might trust most, if this theory is correct, is a face that looks most like a baby's face.
The face would be broad, short nose, large eyes set wide apart, but not too wide (as in fetal alcohol syndrome), and symmetrical.

If you would like to participate in my survey, feel free to volunteer (at no cost to me) any commentary on what faces you trust most and distrust most, based solely in the symmetry of the face rather than the ethnicity.

My point is that science says human brains are hard-wired to immediately respond with trust and attraction to cute baby faces as opposed to faces that have small eyes or are narrow. What kind of nose do you like best as far as what you think is attractive? Most trustworthy?

The description is what I'm interested in, not the ethnicity of the person. What I want to find out for my book is whether or not the human brain is hard-wired to respond favorably to a certain type of face that looks like a baby face, but on an adult. What do you think? Thank you. You may send your answers to auralhistory@hotmail.com, if you want to volunteer your comments for my book.

I write on topics related to anthropology research for the general public.

Isle of Skye
Are you planning to carry out any experimental studies, or do you plan on basing your book solely on surveys and previous research in the field? You may want to look in the field of Psychology, not anthropology, because I would hazard to guess you will find a lot more. It would also be beneficial not to limit yourself, and to be open to the possibility of potential confounds such as race, and familiarity. I have compiled a very short list of journal articles you may want to read and explore.

Suboptimal Exposure to Facial Expressions When Viewing Video Messages From a Small Screen: Effects on Emotion, Attention, and Memory. By: Ravaja, Niklas; Kallinen, Kari; Saari, Timo; Keltikangas-Järvinen, Liisa; Source: Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied. Vol. 10 (2) June 2004, pp. 120-131


Attachment Theory and Intergroup Bias: Evidence That Priming the Secure Base Schema Attenuates Negative Reactions to Out-Groups. By: Mikulincer, Mario; Shaver, Phillip R.; Source: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. Vol. 81 (1) July 2001, pp. 97-115

The Enduring Appeal of Physiognomy: Physical Appearance as a Sign of Temperament, Character, and Intelligence. By: Collins, Alan F.; Source: History of Psychology. Vol. 2 (4) November 1999, pp. 251-276

Facial Maturity and Daily Social Interaction. By: Berry, Diane S.; Landry, Julie C.; Source: Journal of Personality And Social Psychology. Vol. 72 (3) March 1997, pp. 570-580



Do Facial Expressions Signal Specific Emotions?: Judging Emotion From the Face in Context. By: Carroll, James M.; Russell, James A.; Source: Journal of Personality And Social Psychology. Vol. 70 (2) February 1996, pp. 205-218


Perceiving Character in Faces: The Impact of Age-Related Craniofacial Changes on Social Perception. By: Berry, Diane S.; McArthur, Leslie Zebrowitz; Source: Psychological Bulletin. Vol. 100 (1) July 1986, pp. 3-18

The Automaticity of Race and Afrocentric Facial Features in Social Judgments. By: Blair, Irene V.; Judd, Charles M.; Fallman, Jennifer L.; Source: Journal of Personality And Social Psychology. Vol. 87 (6) December 2004, pp. 763-778

Finding the Face in the Crowd: An Anger Superiority Effect. By: Hansen, Christine H.; Hansen, Ranald D.; Source: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. Vol. 54 (6) June 1988, pp. 917-924




Effects of Familiarity on the Perceptual Integrality of the Identity and Expression of Faces: The Parallel-Route Hypothesis Revisited. By: Ganel, Tzvi; Goshen-Gottstein, Yonatan; Source: Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception And Performance. Vol. 30 (3) June 2004, pp. 583-597

Do They All Look Alike? An Exploration of Decision-Making Strategies in Cross-Race Facial Identifications. By: Smith, Steven M.; Stinson, Veronica; Prosser, Matthew A.; Source: Canadian Journal of Behavioral Science. Vol. 36 (2) April 2004, pp. 146-154

Affect and Face Perception: Odors Modulate the Recognition Advantage of Happy Faces. By: Leppänen, Jukka M.; Hietanen, Jari K.; Source: Emotion. Vol. 3 (4) December 2003, pp. 315-326

Preserving Informational Separability and Violating Decisional Separability in Facial Perception and Recognition. By: Wenger, Michael J.; Ingvalson, Erin M.; Source: Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, And Cognition. Vol. 29 (6) November 2003, pp. 1106-1118


Newborns' Preference for Faces: What Is Crucial?. By: Turati, Chiara; Simion, Francesca; Milani, Idanna; Umiltā, Carlo; Source: Developmental Psychology. Vol. 38 (6) November 2002, pp. 875-882

Four Heads Are Better Than One: Combining Face Composites Yields Improvements in Face Likeness. By: Bruce, Vicki; Ness, Hayley; Hancock, Peter J. B.; Newman, Craig; Rarity, Jenny; Source: Journal of Applied Psychology. Vol. 87 (5) October 2002, pp. 894-902


A Direct Measure of Facial Similarity and Its Relation to Human Similarity Perceptions. By: Tredoux, Colin; Source: Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied. Vol. 8 (3) September 2002, pp. 180-193

The Role of Afrocentric Features in Person Perception: Judging by Features and Categories. By: Blair, Irene V.; Judd, Charles M.; Sadler, Melody S.; Jenkins, Christopher; Source: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. Vol. 83 (1) July 2002, pp. 5-25

What Are We Really Priming? Cue-Based Versus Category-Based Processing of Facial Stimuli. By: Livingston, Robert W.; Brewer, Marilynn B.; Source: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. Vol. 82 (1) January 2002, pp. 5-18

The Ontogeny of Face Recognition: Eye Contact and Sweet Taste Induce Face Preference in 9- and 12-Week-Old Human Infants. By: Blass, Elliott M.; Camp, Carole A.; Source: Developmental Psychology. Vol. 37 (6) November 2001, pp. 762-774

Us and Them: Mood Effects on Intergroup Discrimination. By: Forgas, Joseph P.; Fiedler, Klaus; Source: Journal of Personality And Social Psychology. Vol. 70 (1) January 1996, pp. 28-40


Relational Schemas and the Processing of Social Information. By: Baldwin, Mark W.; Source: Psychological Bulletin. Vol. 112 (3) November 1992, pp. 461-484


Stereotypes and Social Judgment: The Effects of Typicality and Group Heterogeneity. By: Lambert, Alan J.; Wyer, Robert S.; Source: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. Vol. 59 (4) October 1990, pp. 676-691

Perceiving Character in Faces: The Impact of Age-Related Craniofacial Changes on Social Perception. By: Berry, Diane S.; McArthur, Leslie Zebrowitz; Source: Psychological Bulletin. Vol. 100 (1) July 1986, pp. 3-18

Judgment Under Emotional Certainty and Uncertainty: The Effects of Specific Emotions on Information Processing. By: Tiedens, Larissa Z.; Linton, Susan; Source: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. Vol. 81 (6) December 2001, pp. 973-988

Mind at Ease Puts a Smile on the Face: Psychophysiological Evidence That Processing Facilitation Elicits Positive Affect. By: Winkielman, Piotr; Cacioppo, John T.; Source: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. Vol. 81 (6) December 2001, pp. 989-1000

Isle-of-Skye
Wednesday, July 6th, 2005, 07:44 PM
Thank you so much for the excellent bibliography.

Skye

Dr. Solar Wolff
Thursday, July 7th, 2005, 05:05 AM
The French anthropologist Claude Levi-Strauss (didn't invent the pants) wrote about human binaries. He said we are hard wired into two choices and that anything beyond two is an abstraction for humans. Overall, he says we have much less free choice than we think. I hate this kind of anthropological philosophy though, so don't ask me for specifics.

Frans_Jozef
Friday, July 8th, 2005, 05:08 AM
Thanks all, for the bibliographies. Unfortunately, my journalism assignment has been switched today from writing about facial perception research to writing about how to make the transition to job sharing. For this research, my reading will take me away from online groups. :) Thanks again all, for your kindness.

Skye
Can you give us a solid explanation why you change your post radically for at least three times? You were initially writing a book, but now you appear on a journalism assignment?
You're either a student blowing hot and cold, trying to impress us with your field work, which rest only in your dreams, or, this is one big sham to test us and valorize our intellectual capabilities, considering that half the world think of us non-conformists as low brow nazi-trash.
I wonder what assignment you're really into, how you found us and what your expectations are in regard to Skadi as a whole.