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morfrain_encilgar
Wednesday, June 22nd, 2005, 03:40 PM
Big Brother offers 'role models'

Reality TV show Big Brother portrays role models with values that inspire its viewers, the chief executive of Channel 4 has said.

Andy Duncan said the show offered positive values, transformatory experiences and examples of personal self-improvement and growth.

The contestants had honesty, integrity, constancy and kindness, he added.

Mr Duncan, a practising Christian, was talking to a Christian group about his channel's religious output.

Personal growth

He added that while he understood some may find the behaviour and language of some Big Brother contestants as immoral, he urged fellow Christians to reassess their views on the popular series.

"Tolerance and understanding of others - fundamental New Testament values - can only be built on knowledge and respect. Condemnation so often springs from ignorance and fear," he said.

"Big Brother winners are all role models in their way, not only because over past series they've included ethnic minorities, a gay man, a transsexual as well as an evangelical Christian, but because in the final analysis viewers choose people whose values they identify with and admire.

"For many viewers they offer positive examples and practical inspiration for their own lives, and that's something I'm certainly not ashamed of."

The current Big Brother series has seen contestants drinking heavily, swearing at each other and swapping sexual favours.

Mr Duncan's lecture to social action movement Faithworks examined whether television has a responsibility to build trust in society.

Christian values

He made his comments just days after the Archbishop of Canterbury, Dr Rowan Williams, launched an attack on the media, accusing journalists of causing an "embarrassingly low level of trust" in the profession.

While Mr Duncan said he agreed with some things Dr Rowan had to say, he believed public service television was a "powerful potential for good", citing Jamie's School Dinners as an example.

He added: "I wouldn't be at Channel 4 if I felt the organisation, its culture, or the job itself, were in any way at odds with my Christian values.

"These inform my behaviour, my relationships with colleagues, and the everyday judgements I make."

Polaris
Wednesday, June 22nd, 2005, 04:28 PM
Reality programming is possibly the most flawed concept of TV ever. First came the hit Survivor, then Pandora's Box was opened. Pretty soon more shows came along and became more and more ridiculous as the years passed by. I have seen Big Brother before, I can't say that I am a fan. How contestants on the show can "inspire" viewers is totally beyond me. :|

morfrain_encilgar
Wednesday, June 22nd, 2005, 04:44 PM
Reality programming is possibly the most flawed concept of TV ever. First came the hit Survivor, then Pandora's Box was opened. Pretty soon more shows came along and became more and more ridiculous as the years passed by. I have seen Big Brother before, I can't say that I am a fan. How contestants on the show can "inspire" viewers is totally beyond me. :|

Here I think Big Brother came first before Survivor, and the Americans copied this idea. In one series of BB here I remember there was a fight in the house and the security guards were brought in to stop them.

Polaris
Wednesday, June 22nd, 2005, 05:01 PM
Maybe it did. I can't really remember. Reality programming is so popular here in America that the whole network is practically over run with reality shows. I think the craze is finally dying down because the producers are running out of stupid ideas.

(thinks of Hell's Kitchen)

Renwein
Wednesday, June 22nd, 2005, 06:06 PM
Big Brother was made in The Netherlands, then we did it and made a whole other bunch of reality tv-shows some of which americans copied. (Pop Idol, URRRRGH)
I think the whole appeal was that people might 'bonk' on live tv like in the dutch version... i don't know why. (and if you look at the 'similar threads' link at the bottom you'll see what happened in the danish version...) they did try to present it as 'scientific' with psychologists talking etc. although i don't think they do that anymore, and just make it more obvious (like 'Celebrity Love Island'). I can't belive people actually waste their time watching those programmes and reading the magazines that spend half their pages talking about it...

It's hard to believe this guy either, although he seems to mean what he's saying, I don't think anyone would take him seriously, I think it'd be pretty difficult for most people to talk themselves into really believing that. I guess the ability to do it would be useful if you wanted to be chief executive of a TV company though, because if he actually had the values he says he does it would be bad for ratings. (except the one about tolerance of course, so we can tolerate his crappy output)

zell
Monday, October 10th, 2005, 12:14 PM
so big bro has become a tool to tell us what our morals should be.just great.