PDA

View Full Version : Russian Latin script transcription



Aistulf
Thursday, March 24th, 2005, 08:54 PM
Since there exists no official Russian Latin script transcription, nor a non-Germanic lingual/linguistics forum, I decided to show you what I made up; some of my Russian pals seem to even actually like it! :)


Russian in Latin script

а = a
б = b
в = v/w
г = g
д = d
е = e [e/ye]
ё = [yo]
ж = ź [zh]
з = z
и = i
й = j
к = k
л = l
м = m
н = n
о = o
п = p
р = r
с = s
т = t
у = u
ф = f
х = x [Olde English "kh"]
ц = c [ts]
ч = ć [tsh]
ш = ś [sh]
щ = [shch]
ъ = q [`]
ы = y
ь = h [']
э = [eh ('short' "e")]
ю = [yu ("yoo")]
я = [ya]

A few examples:



За ваше здоровье.

Old style (Russian-English Latin) transliteration:
Za vashe zdorov'ye.

My new style of transliteration:
Za vaśe zdorovhe.




Я-голландец.

Old style (Russian-English Latin) transliteration:
Ya-gollandets.

My new style of transliteration:
-gollandec.




Ещё

Old style (Russian-English Latin) transliteration:
Yeshchyo

My new style of transliteration:
E




Россия

Old style (Russian-English Latin) transliteration:
Rossiya

My new style of transliteration:
Rossi




английски

Old style (Russian-English Latin) transliteration:
Angliyski

My new style of transliteration:
Anglijski




Человек

Old style (Russian-English Latin) transliteration:
Chelovyek

My new style of transliteration:
Ćelovek




Аэропорт

Old style (Russian-English Latin) transliteration:
Aeroport

My new style of transliteration:
Aroport

Appalachian
Thursday, March 24th, 2005, 09:52 PM
Since there exists no official Russian Latin script transcription, nor a non-Germanic lingual/linguistics forum, I decided to show you what I made up; some of my Russian pals seem to even actually like it! :) Interesting, and a nice effort, but I see some potential for confusion here. Some things to consider:



ж = ź [zh]
ц = c [ts]
ч = ć [tsh]
ш = ś [sh]
щ = [shch]
Many of the South Slavic and West Slavic languages already use some of these characters, but in a different way from what you have suggested here. In these languages, / / represents the same phoneme as / ш /, / č / same as / ч /, / / the same as / ж /, etc. Perhaps bringing your transliteration system more into line with these already existing standards for Slavic languages could help avoid some confusion.



Old style (Russian-English Latin) transliteration:
Za vashe zdorov'ye.

My new style of transliteration:
Za vaśe zdorovhe.
The use of the / h / to represent the Russian myagki znak seems a bit strange to me. When I see the / h /, it makes me think of aspiration rather than the softening that the myagki znak represents. Also, with the already existing transliteration schemes in the back of my mind, seeing / vh / makes me think of something like Polish / wrz / . What is your objection to the use of the / ' / to represent the soft sign?

Additionally, the use of / q / (which almost always, to the best of my knowledge, represents a consonant) to signify the tvyordi znak seems very unusual. What is your thinking here?




Old style (Russian-English Latin) transliteration:
Ya-gollandets.

My new style of transliteration:
-gollandec.
/ / is interesting, in that it almost looks like the archaic character used to represent the same phoneme in written Old Church Slavonic. :)




Old style (Russian-English Latin) transliteration:
Yeshchyo

My new style of transliteration:
E Here, again, there is the potential for confusion, since in the extant South Slavic and West Slavic languages, / / represents the / ш / phoneme. On the other hand, / щ / is usually represented, as in the Slovene, by two characters: / č / .




Old style (Russian-English Latin) transliteration:
Angliyski

My new style of transliteration:
Anglijski
Both of these forms are already widely in use. The first is in keeping with the Library of Congress transliteration scheme, and represents a transliteration that seems clear to Anglo-Americans, whereas the second is widely used by Continental Europeans.




Old style (Russian-English Latin) transliteration:
Chelovyek

My new style of transliteration:
Ćelovek
See above regarding / č / = / ч / .

Another issue I see here is that for English speakers (and speakers of many other Western languages) who are not wholely facile with the Russian language, / e / alone may not bring across the true sound of the Russian / e / , hence this word's transliteration as / chelovyek / according the LoC system. Perhaps the addition of a diacritic to the character in your transliteration scheme would resolve this issue. Of course, one must be careful here, since the actual phoneme represented by the Russian / e / can change from [ y3 ] to [ i ] or even other variants, depending on word and syllable stress or according to dialectal variations.


Anyway, those are just a few things to think about. Overall, though, this is an interesting experiment. Nice effort!