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Theudanaz
Saturday, March 12th, 2005, 11:35 PM
http://www.ancestry.com/learn/facts/Fact.aspx?&fid=2&ln=


Interesting to cull statistics from this site, mostly from 1880 census I believe, but surname stats are pretty current. Note Jewish names steadily rising above average. English names mostly hold to average. Spanish / Latin and asian names for most part are below average in life expectancy, esp. vietnamese. Korean names have been rising in LE. Scandinavian names are steadily above average for the most part.

On this site one can also compare occupations for various surnames in 1880. Note Jewish surnames often associated with peddler, merchant, tailor, cigar maker, dry goods. Note caucasian names mostly associated with laborer, farmer, carpenter, butcher.

See if you can find other statistics.

Agrippa
Sunday, March 13th, 2005, 12:28 AM
Interesting, my name was above and under the average, depending on the exact time.

F.e. 1991 my name was much above the average, 2000 under...

Similar for my mothers family surname, but very extreme since 1951 much below and now above average.l

Grandmothers family name is mostly average :)

I think single names aren't that important since natural fluctuation is too big. But interesting to see most of my family's surnames in the US...

Nordgau
Sunday, March 13th, 2005, 01:42 AM
I think single names aren't that important since natural fluctuation is too big. But interesting to see most of my family's surnames in the US...

Yeah, "my" folks are concentrated mostly in Iowa. :P

Siegmund
Sunday, March 13th, 2005, 02:26 AM
Sadly, the life expectency for my German relatives by 1945 was only about 25 years old, according to this site.

Agrippa
Sunday, March 13th, 2005, 02:56 AM
Highest percentage of fathers name in Wisconsin, Maryland and New York. Generally centered in the Middle West/North East of the US. Highest immigration 1867.
Grandmother father side mostly in Ohio and again mainly same region...though some in California as well.

Mothers in in the Middle West/North East as well. Iowa and Wisconsin in particular.

Interesting is, for my mothers family name a higher LE was about 1975 (90+). My great-grandfather who was the bearer of the name reached 99 years of age and died in the 70's.

Interesting coincidence...

QuietWind
Sunday, March 13th, 2005, 03:15 AM
It shows my maiden family name as having a life expectancy of average to above average. The ironic thing is that my father, his siblings, and their offspring are the only ones alive in his family. Their parents (my grandparents) died back when I was 3 and 12. My father's grandparents died when he was a child.

Thorn
Sunday, March 13th, 2005, 07:29 PM
Ok, my ancestors had a life expectation below 20 around the year 1945. :-O

Agrippa
Sunday, March 13th, 2005, 07:49 PM
Because almost every surname of my extended family is strong in Wisconsin I looked what can be told about Wisconsin and Germans-European immigrants:


Many of these conflicts surrounded temperance laws - - many Yankees disapproved of drinking while most Germans considered it normal - - and the extent to which German language and culture could be taught in schools.


Many immigrants, especially Germans, had established their own schools upon settling in Wisconsin as a way to preserve their own cultures.Yankees often saw the schools as a form of unpatriotic resistance to assimilation into American culture.


a range of more moderate voices argued for the inevitability of assimilation, contending that learning English would not destroy German culture.

http://www.wisconsinhistory.org/turningpoints/tp-031/?action=more_essay

Interesting story.

Nordgau
Sunday, March 13th, 2005, 11:57 PM
Census of 1920: The core realm of my surname bearers is, as said, located in Iowa. My surname is so seldom that it is only represented in about the half of the U.S. states. Eastwards from Iowa, "we" extend in the states along the Great Lakes and south of the Canadian border up to the Atlantic: Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Maryland, New Jersey, New York. Apart from Connecticut then, we have not reached New England yet. West of Iowa, we expand southwards with Nebraska, Kansas, and Texas. In the southeast quarter of the U.S., we have put our jackboots only in Mississippi. In the far west, our flag is set in California, Nevada, and then in Washington and Montana.

I declare the Oklahoma corridor ours, so that our old family dream of the one empire "from New York to Chicago and down to Houston" finally becomes reality. I also request the anschluß of Idaho and Oregon--our lebensraum in the western territories needs to be coherent and round. Finally, I want at least extraterritorial autobahn connections from Mississippi to Texas and to Illinois. Don't think that we gave up our brothers and sisters in their difficult position in Mississippi. :eking

Northern Paladin
Monday, March 14th, 2005, 03:25 AM
http://www.ancestry.com/learn/facts/Fact.aspx?&fid=2&ln=


Interesting to cull statistics from this site, mostly from 1880 census I believe, but surname stats are pretty current. Note Jewish names steadily rising above average. English names mostly hold to average. Spanish / Latin and asian names for most part are below average in life expectancy, esp. vietnamese. Korean names have been rising in LE. Scandinavian names are steadily above average for the most part.

On this site one can also compare occupations for various surnames in 1880. Note Jewish surnames often associated with peddler, merchant, tailor, cigar maker, dry goods. Note caucasian names mostly associated with laborer, farmer, carpenter, butcher.

See if you can find other statistics.

Rich WASP's and their kind live longer than the rest. Duh? :D

Dr. Solar Wolff
Monday, March 14th, 2005, 04:42 AM
Sadly, the life expectency for my German relatives by 1945 was only about 25 years old, according to this site.

Siegmund, you are going to love this. Enter in the name Cohen. Look at the peroid of the Second World War. While your ancestors were apparently being killed, those Cohen people's life expectancy shot way up! What happened to the Holocaust? These are government records. One would expect they could cook the books better than that.

Siegmund
Monday, March 14th, 2005, 05:00 AM
Siegmund, you are going to love this. Enter in the name Cohen. Look at the peroid of the Second World War. While your ancestors were apparently being killed, those Cohen people's life expectancy shot way up! What happened to the Holocaust? These are government records. One would expect they could cook the books better than that.
Based on your note I tried about a dozen other typically Jewish surnames as well, and found the phenomenon held true for more than half of them. It makes you wonder what, exactly, these numbers mean.

Allenson
Monday, March 14th, 2005, 03:52 PM
we have not reached New England yet.

Well, if your clan would like to come, I'm sure you'd all make a fine addition. I will loby for your admission. ;)

I enjoyed reading the posts by the hypothetical Americans--Agrippa, BM and Nordgau. :P

Perhaps it could bridge some divides when the knowledge that folk bearing your family names receives a small but personal touch. ;)

Nordraserei
Tuesday, March 15th, 2005, 02:51 AM
Bradshaw=Average to Below Average
Ditmer=All over the place
Andersen=Above Average

Theudanaz
Tuesday, March 15th, 2005, 04:36 AM
All over the place would indicate fewer records, therefore less "smooth" of a line. The interpolated average would have to be done more or less manually.



Bradshaw=Average to Below Average
Ditmer=All over the place
Andersen=Above Average