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Aeternitas
Monday, February 28th, 2005, 06:57 PM
The Anschluß in pictures - a collection of pictures from various online sources, for historically informational purposes.

Austrians demonstrating their approval of the 'Anschluss' (Annexation) of Austria into the German Reich

http://media.gettyimages.com/photos/16th-march-1938-austrians-demonstrating-their-approval-of-the-of-picture-id3163103

German soldiers removing a barrier along the Austria-German border

http://media.gettyimages.com/photos/march-1938-german-soldiers-removing-a-barrier-along-the-austriagerman-picture-id104402230

Members of the League of German Girls wave flags in support

https://www.ushmm.org/lcmedia/photo/lc/image/78/78546.jpg

Austrian girls jubilantly welcome the arrival of German soldiers following the Anschluß Österreichs

https://41.media.tumblr.com/efc1ba377f1da13c3dbbdbfbf82ec9fb/tumblr_mpqxjlLv1C1spwf52o1_500.jpg

Austrian women in Salzburg celebrate the union of Austria

http://media.gettyimages.com/photos/austrian-women-wave-swastikas-at-salzburg-to-celebrate-the-union-of-picture-id2658872

German troops stage parade in Kuftein - welcome to a member of the military band by a young woman

http://cache1.asset-cache.net/gc/545715755-reich-annexation-anschluss-of-austria-entry-gettyimages.jpg?v=1&c=IWSAsset&k=2&d=X7WJLa88Cweo9HktRLaNXnNxBrRW9VKYUVIIco J6pxo90XYA1igYyJMLVjae7petrQXojFMHppWLEO 4Z42Mw1w%3d%3d

The Wehrmacht greeted with flowers during the Anschluss, 1938.

https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/564x/e2/1f/04/e21f045a142cb420d82eb47d4b822716.jpg

Aeternitas
Monday, February 28th, 2005, 06:57 PM
"Yes! To Reunification of Austria with Germany" Germany; 1938

https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/564x/18/e5/30/18e530d5259d421af2eb3edd144ef08c.jpg

"Ein fester Block Ein millionenfaches Ja!" Propaganda poster for the Union of Austria, 1938.

https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/564x/59/d1/37/59d1370b2782eef56753bd4b42e52c05.jpg

German Propaganda poster - Greater Germany [Vote] Yes!

https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/564x/40/88/54/4088541b7782727493f5098fde49f7e0.jpg

Austria returns home

https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/564x/12/0b/2d/120b2d3c19ac0137ad4acc93e54f310d.jpg

https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/564x/19/34/b8/1934b81b0e2fd88fdc7e34b0d89ee831.jpg

Voting ballot from 10 April 1938. The ballot text reads "Do you agree with the reunification of Austria with the German Reich that was enacted on 13 March 1938, and do you vote for the party of our leader Adolf Hitler?"

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/57/Stimmzettel-Anschluss.jpg

Huzar
Tuesday, March 1st, 2005, 12:05 PM
Many years after, Austrian people said they were victims of a "brutal nazi invasion", but, seeing the photos, reality seems different to me. Austrian people were happy. Although, i think it shouldn't exist an austrian state : if they speak german, they're german (north-italian opinion)

Aeternitas
Tuesday, March 1st, 2005, 12:32 PM
A majority of people (99.7%) voted for this union and many actually viewed it as a liberation, hence the enthusiasm upon receiving German troops into Austrian cities and towns. It was actually this enthusiasm with which the German troops entry was received -- they basically met zero resistance -- that surprised both non-NS and the NS themselves, and ultimately lead to the consolidation and application of the idea of a "Heim ins Reich". The results of the plebiscite held about a month later confirmed this. Unlike Schuschnigg's plebiscite, there was a "no" vote option, so people could actually vote no, and some actually did so (e.g. the village of village of Innervillgraten had the lowest pro-union support). Another fact that is oftentimes conveniently left out of the story is that the union was completed without any casualties. Thus historically the Anschluß is a good example of self-determination of a group of Germanic people.

Here is an interesting read about the Anschluß, as well as about the case of Sudeten Germans: The Union of the German People of Austria and the Sudeten Germans With the German People of the Reich (http://www.wintersonnenwende.com/scriptorium/english/archives/caseforgermany/cfg09.html)


The rise of the Austrian people in rebellion against Schuschnigg in a few hours, the fall of Schuschnigg from power, the telegram from Dr. Seyss-Inquart, the head of the new government, to Hitler to send troops to preserve order, the triumphant march of the soldiers of the Reich into Austria, received with acclamations of joy by the Austrian people, and the progress of Hitler through the country received with such scenes of enthusiastic welcome as are unparalleled in history, took the people of this country completely by surprise. They had been carefully educated in the belief that the "independence" of Austria, that is their separation from Germany, was the wish of the Austrian people. The facts that the Austrian Parliament in 1918-19 passed a unanimous vote in favour of union with the Reich, and that Dollfuss, finding that if he held an election the vote would be in favour of the Anschluss, had abolished parliament and made himself a dictator, that Schuschnigg his successor had never dared to hold an election, that 40,000 Austrians were in exile across the frontier and thousands in prison without trial, and that Schuschnigg only held power by an armed police with the forces of the allies behind him, made no impression on the people of this country, deceived by a skilful propaganda. Many still believe that Hitler has seized Austria by force of arms against the wishes of the Austrian people.

It is a new feature in the history of invasions, for the guns of the invaders to be decorated with wreaths of flowers by the invaded.
In order to get a correct understanding of the real attitude of the great mass of Austrian people, it is necessary to go back to what happened when the war was ended. The quarrel between Austria and Germany which ended in the battle of Sadowa in 1866, was really a quarrel between the two dynasties, the Hohenzollerns and the Habsburgs for supreme power over the German speaking peoples. By the defeat of Austria the Hohenzollerns became supreme, and in 1879 an alliance was formed between the two countries by Bismarck, which led to Germany supporting Austria in her quarrel with Serbia in 1914. During four years Germans of the Reich and Austrian Germans had fought side by side. The long struggle against almost the world whole and the humiliation of defeat which they both suffered welded them together into one people.

On the fall of the Habsburg dynasty, the German Austrians formed a Council of State, and on the 9th of November 1918, this Council of State sent a message to Chancellor Max von Baden of the German Reich: "In this hour of great historical crisis the German-Austrian Council of State sends to the German people its fraternal greetings and the warmest wishes for its future. The German-Austrian Council of State expresses the hope that the German people in Austria will have a part in the election of representatives of the Constitutive National Assembly which is to decide the future political order of the German nation."

On November 12th 1918, the Provisional Assembly for German Austria passed the following law: "German Austria is a part of the German Republic. Special laws are to regulate the participation of German Austria in the legislation and administration of the German Republic, as well as the extent of the validity of laws and institutions of the German Republic as applied to German Austria."

On November 30th 1918, the Reich government passed the following decree: "If the German National Assembly resolves that Austria in accordance with her wish is to be admitted to the German Reich, then the German-Austrian deputies shall join the Assembly as members with equal rights."

On February 4th 1919, President Dr. Dinghofer addressed the German-Austrian National Assembly as follows:

"Most honourable National Assembly. The day after tomorrow on February 6th, the newly elected Constitutive National Assembly of the German Republic in Weimar meets for the first time. The conditions whereby we participate in the same as rightful members have not yet been reached and indeed not yet created. Nevertheless we cannot ignore this great and significant event. The idea of Greater Germany is not dead for us Germans in these provinces, and never, never was it dead. Like a star glowing out of the darkness the joyous hope of the realization of our longing dream beckons us: in all the sorrow and all the care that now surround us there glows the hope of lasting reunion with our old Motherland. With the greatest enthusiasm we therefore greet our brothers yonder in the Reich. We acclaim them with joy. The German people inseparably united in its entirety, no longer separated by boundary-posts, no longer separated by the jealousy of rulers, shall and must become our homeland again."

In his opening speech at the first session of the German National Assembly at Weimar on February 6th 1919, the people's deputy, Friedrich Ebert, spoke as follows: "...We also cannot forego the union of the whole German nation in one Reich. Our German Austrian brothers have already declared themselves part of the Greater-German Republic at their National Assembly on November 12th. Now the German Austrian National Assembly has once again amid the greatest enthusiasm sent its greetings and expressed the hope that our National Assembly and theirs will succeed in re-establishing the link that was broken by force in 1866. German Austria must, they say, be united with the motherland for all time."

At Weimar on 21st February 1919, the following motion was made by the deputies Löbe, Grober, Haase (Berlin), Von Payer, Dr. Count von Posadowsky-Wehner and Dr. Stresemann: "May the National Assembly resolve: The National Assembly notes with lively satisfaction the resolutions by which the representatives of German Austria have declared their membership of the German people as a whole. It affirms to its German Austrian brothers that the Germans of the Reich and of Austria constitute an indivisible unit, transcending former state boundaries, and expresses the confident hope that through the negotiations to be entered upon by the governments this inner unity will soon find in settled political forms an expression that will be recognized by all the Powers of the World." This motion was supported by all parties in the Assembly.

This movement for union between the Germans of Austria and the Germans of the Reich put the three democracies of Great Britain, France and the United States in a somewhat embarrassing position. They had promised self determination to the peoples of Europe, and both Germany and Austria had elected democratic governments and these democratic governments had unanimously decided to unite. On the other hand, the allies had decided that for strategic reasons this union between Germany and Austria must be prevented, and an "Independent" Austria created. Accordingly on the 29th of December 1918, the French foreign minister M. Pichon made the following statement:

"There remains the question of German-Austria. It is serious but it should not alarm us. We have means of solving it so that it will not bring our enemies the compensations and resources that they hope from it. In settling the new status of Germany and of the ruins of Austria it will be contingent on the Allied Powers to take measures which will decisively reduce the power of Germany to fit proportions and thus deprive her of the chance of indemnifying herself with the Austrian races remaining outside Czecho-Slovakia, Poland and Yugo-Slavia, for what she will irrevocably have lost in any case by sanctioning our victory. This victory must therefore in the first place be transformed into all its just consequences and into the application of the rights which it gives us over the vanquished, to remove the possibility of these again endangering the security and freedom of the world."

Article 80 of the Treaty of Versailles was as follows: "Germany acknowledges and will respect strictly the independence of Austria, within the frontiers which may be fixed in a treaty between that State and the Principal Allied and Associated Powers; she agrees that this independence shall be inalienable, except with the consent of the Council of the League of Nations", which meant referring it to the Greek Kalends.

The German delegates signed this clause, but made the following protest: "In Article 80 is demanded the permanent recognition of Austrian independence within the boundaries laid down by the Peace Treaty of the Allied and Associated Governments with Germany. Germany never has had, and never will have the intention of altering the German-Austrian frontier by force. But should the population of Austria, whose history and culture have been closely linked with its kindred German country for thousands of years, wish to re-establish with Germany the connection that was only dissolved recently by a military decision, then Germany cannot pledge herself to oppose the wish of her German brothers in Austria, since the right of self-determination of peoples must apply generally and not solely to the detriment of Germany. Any other procedure would be in contradiction to the principles laid down in the Congress speech of President Wilson on February 11th, 1918."

In drawing up the constitution of the German Reich, another attempt was made to keep the door open for union with Austria. The following two clauses were introduced: Article 2. "The territory of the Reich consists of the territories of the German countries. Other territories can be admitted to the Reich by law if their population desires it in accordance with the right of self-determination."

Article 61, par. 2. "After union with the German Reich, German Austria shall receive the right of participating in the Reich Council with the number of votes corresponding with her population. Until such time the representatives of German Austria shall have an advisory vote."

On September 2nd 1919, the following note was sent by President Clemenceau to the President of the German Reich.


"The Allied and Associated Powers have taken note of the German constitution of August 11th 1919. They confirm that the conditions of Paragraph 2 of Article 61 constitute a formal violation of Article 80 of the Peace Treaty signed at Versailles on June 28th, 1919.
It is a double violation:
1. Article 61, in stipulating the admission of Austria to the Reichsrat, likens this Republic to the German provinces which constitute the German Empire; this is incompatible with the observance of Austria's independence.
2. In allowing and regulating the participation of Austria in the Reichsrat, Article 61 creates a political bond and a common political action between Germany and Austria, in complete contradiction to the independence of the latter.
The Allied and Associated Powers therefore, having reminded the German Government that Article 178 of the German Constitution declares that the 'conditions of the Treaty of Versailles cannot be affected by the constitution', summon the German Government to take the proper steps to annul this violation forthwith, by declaring Article 61, paragraph 2, void.
With the reservation as to further measures in the event of refusal, and indeed on the basis of the Treaty (namely, Article 429), the Allied and Associated Powers inform the German Government that this violation of its obligations in an essential point will oblige the Powers to extend their occupation immediately on the right bank of the Rhine, if their just demand be not complied with within 14 days of the date of this note."

The clause was withdrawn.

Since then the agitation for the Anschluss has never ceased, and has grown in intensity as Germany under Hitler once more became a free nation.

After the abortive rising and the deplorable assassination of Dollfuss, the movement in favour of the Anschluss was savagely suppressed.

Staying in Salzburg at the time, we saw young peasants from the hills being marched in as prisoners. The Castle was full of prisoners and several were shot without trial although they had not been near Vienna and could have had nothing to do with the assassination.

When Schuschnigg broke all his promises to Hitler, and announced his travesty of a plebiscite, the Austrian pot boiled over. There was no register of voters, no arrangements to protect the secrecy of the ballot, and only one voting card with "Independent Austria, Heil Schuschnigg, Ja" printed on it. Anyone wishing to vote No, had to cut out a card of the same size, write on it No and hand it openly to Schuschnigg officials who were the only people allowed at the polling stations, with the probability of arrest and imprisonment.

On the 11th of March the following telegram was sent by Dr. Seyss-Inquart to Hitler: "The provisional Government of Austria which, after the resignation of the Schuschnigg government, consider it their duty to restore calm and order in Austria, direct to the German Government the urgent request to support them in their duty and to help them in preventing bloodshed. To this end they ask the German Government to send German troops as soon as possible."

After the receipt of this telegram, German troops marched in and the Anschluss was accomplished without the loss of a single life.

USS Dixiecrat
Tuesday, March 1st, 2005, 06:37 PM
Looking at such pictures makes me sad, because I think of what could have been, and I wonder how many of those brave Germans were slaughtered. :(

Aeternitas
Thursday, April 13th, 2006, 06:50 AM
THE president of Austria has become the country's first head of state to admit that a large number of its citizens welcomed Adolf Hitler with open arms when the dictator annexed the country.

Heinz Fischer said that a "not inconsiderable portion of the population'' greeted the Anschluss or annexation in 1938 with "euphoria'', despite knowing that "Hitler meant war''. In addition many had celebrated Hitler's initial military successes, he said.
Continued (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/germany/1515526/We-welcomed-Hitler-admits-Austrias-head.html)

Slå ring om Norge
Thursday, April 13th, 2006, 08:58 AM
.
And so did maybe most Norwegians too.

Our war history, and after war history are all thin soup fake.

Quislings Nasjonal Samling may have had as much as 50 - 60 000 members, but much true documentation got lost, "of various reasons"

Most norwegians had no problems with Hitler, the infrastructure was improved, and it was a shame that it ended so early and abrupt. All my grandparents collaborated to some degree, as most norwegians. After the war, all was forced to refuse that it had been so.

Germans soldiers behaved exemplaric in relation to the Norwegian civil population, something that definitively not can be said about our "allies". Also it was England and France that pressed the war on us, not Germany.

I send a thank to Hitler for sending 500 000 of his best soldiers to protect Norway. Oberstgeneral Dietl (Division Lappland) was also a great embassador for Germany.

Welcome back anytime, but please knock-knock on the door next time..:D

Nordgau
Thursday, April 13th, 2006, 01:40 PM
THE president of Austria has become the country's first head of state to admit that a large number of its citizens welcomed Adolf Hitler with open arms when the dictator annexed the country.

Höhö, your state of mind seems to light up at least a bit, Herr Fischer. You could have added as examples for such "citizens" very prominent Austrian leaders of your own political party, who had tried to unify Austria with the Reich already in 1918/19, and who were very happy with the formation of the Greater German Reich in 1938 through Adolf Hitler, such as Karl Renner and even the Jewish Otto Bauer ...

Imperator X
Thursday, April 13th, 2006, 06:23 PM
Why not? They should have. Austria is a part of Grossdeutschland. Switzerland, France (Frank-Reich ;)), Great Britain, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, the Netherlands, and the Sudetenland should all have been more than happy to come back to the greater Germanic fold. Their unique cultures would have been preserved as autonomous regions of the new Am grosstendeutschland. Each region of Europe could be partitioned as the Celtic provinces, Germanic provinces, Norditalienisch provinces, Gallic province, Slavic etc. etc. just like in the Roman empire. 1,000 years of pan-European peace anyone? :)

Prince Eugen
Thursday, April 13th, 2006, 08:48 PM
Why not? They should have. Austria is a part of Grossdeutschland. Switzerland, France (Frank-Reich ;)), Great Britain, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, the Netherlands, and the Sudetenland should all have been more than happy to come back to the greater Germanic fold. Their unique cultures would have been preserved as autonomous regions of the new Am grosstendeutschland. Each region of Europe could be partitioned as the Celtic provinces, Germanic provinces, Norditalienisch provinces, Gallic province, Slavic etc. etc. just like in the Roman empire. 1,000 years of pan-European peace anyone? :)
If mr A.H won the war now we would speak about Pax Europea not about Pax Judaica!The N.S is the path to return to our traditional (Germanic,Celtic,Slavic,GrecoRoman etc) traditional world!

GermanBund
Saturday, May 13th, 2006, 07:11 AM
Why shouldn't they have? Austrians are Germans. The Anschluss was a "natural occurence" and it's sad today that while West and East Germany have united, Austria is not allowed to become part of Germany.

Nachtengel
Saturday, February 28th, 2009, 02:50 AM
THE president of Austria has become the country's first head of state to admit that a large number of its citizens welcomed Adolf Hitler with open arms when the dictator annexed the country.
Well, they did...

http://diepresse.com/images/uploads/e/c/f/368335/anschluss2_ORF20080307184327.jpg

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d5/Bundesarchiv_Bild_137-049271%2C_Anschluss_%C3%96sterreich.jpg

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/77/Bundesarchiv_Bild_146-1985-083-11%2C_Anschluss_%C3%96sterreich%2C_Innsb ruck.jpg

It's odd because everytime I talk to Austrians, they always make up some excuse like the Nationalsocialists manipulated them and made them victims assassinating Dollfuss and annexing them. Ah well, I guess falling into the other extreme and self flagellation is no better.

Ossi
Saturday, February 28th, 2009, 03:38 AM
It's odd because everytime I talk to Austrians, they always make up some excuse like the Nationalsocialists manipulated them and made them victims assassinating Dollfuss and annexing them. Ah well, I guess falling into the other extreme and self flagellation is no better.
The funniest (or saddest, whichever you prefer) is when self-loathing Germans and Austrians pass Hitler onto each other. He wasn't German, he was an Austrian. No, he was a German. He wasn't ours, he was yours. No, he was yours!

:D

Sigurd
Saturday, February 28th, 2009, 03:03 PM
My flatmate asked me for a joke a while ago - "So, apart from Fritzl, are there any other notable Austrians." I replied, "Yea, we had Hitler." :D :thumbup :P

As Nordgau already stated correctly earlier in this thread: Austrians, and Austrian politicians felt that the newly created Austria was a freak birth and were considering joining Germany as early as 1918/19 - but they were too slow to put the powers of Saint-Germain before a fait accompli.

Then, as also stated correctly by Nordgau already - between the wars, there were many Greater German sympathies --- all mainstream Austrian parties, including the Social Democrats, believed in unification with Germany, and consequently were happy when Hitler - a man originally one of our own, anyhow - made this wish of many a reality.

Sympathies for NS were also high, and the claim that "Austria was Hitler's first victim" is quite simply incorrect. We were the most fanatic about it - even though we only made up 10% of the German population, we made up 25% of leading NS party officials.

Obviously, for a long time, Austria has kept its head out of trouble, claiming "Hitler wasn't our fault and we didn't want to be annexed" --- but that is obviously a huge lie. Unification with Germany was a popular idea and the Austro-Fascism practiced by Dollfuß, being highly unpopular, helped kindle that fire further.

Siebenbürgerin
Saturday, February 28th, 2009, 03:04 PM
Hmm, the president of Austria admits they welcomed Hitler. So then it's an admission it was consensual. But in some manuals in schools and online sources it's still written it was a invasion and aggression. Here an example:


The invasion of Austria was a pre-meditated aggressive step in furthering the plan to wage aggressive wars against other countries.
The source:
http://avalon.law.yale.edu/imt/judaus.asp

ewald steiner
Saturday, February 28th, 2009, 03:23 PM
Adolf Hiter was the greatest German of all times. Those who lived and experienced his time, were blessed. The entire forces of Judea were concentrated in destroying the man and his idea. He was fated to his destiny. The fruits of his defeat are there to be seen , our race, our culture, our living space being ripped apart, devastated, raped and pillaged. The Judeans celebrate the defeat of the only man who was able to put a check in time and space to their hegemonic designs, they celebrate the occupation of our land and the resulting random melange of mutually disconnected multitudes battening the soil of Germany and calling themselves Germans.

Aeternitas
Saturday, February 28th, 2009, 04:04 PM
Yes, the desire for a unification with Germany existed in Austria since immediately after the end of WWI. Article 2 of the German-Austrian constitution, decided unanimously by the German-Austrian national assembly (November 12, 1918), stated that German-Austria is a part of the German Republic.

This desire was also felt in Germany, especially in the Southern areas. A speech by Social Democrat chairman of the Council of Peoples Representatives and the National Assembly, Friedrich Ebert illustrates the German determination:

"Germany laid down her arms in confidence, trusting in the principles of President Wilson.
Now let them give us a Wilson peace, to which we have a claim....The German people has won its right to self-determination at home. It cannot sacrifice that right abroad. We cannot renounce uniting the whole German nation in the frame-work of a single Empire. Our German-Austrian brothers as far back as November 12th last [1918] in their National Assembly declared themselves to be part of the great German Republic. Now the German-Austrian National Assembly has again [January 19, 1919], amid storms of enthusiasm, sent us its greeting and given expression to the hope that our National Assembly and theirs will succeed in again uniting the bonds which violence tore asunder in 1866. [Austro-Prussian War] German-Austria must be united with the Motherland for all time. I am sure that I am speaking for the whole National Assembly when I welcome this historic manifestation sincerely and joyfully, and reply to it with heartfelt fraternity. The brothers of our blood and destiny can be assured that we will welcome them with open arms and hearts in the new Empire of the German nation. They belong to us and we belong to them. (Applause.) I may also express the hope that the National Assembly will empower the future Imperial Government to negotiate as soon as possible with the German-Austrian free State concerning final union. Then there will be no more frontier posts between us. Then we shall really be a single people of brothers."Source (http://forums.skadi.net/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.ww1-propaganda-cards.com%2Fanschluss.html)

The reason this had to wait until 1938 was none other than the Allied opposition. In theory Germany and Austria were entitled to the principle of self-determination (see Wilson's Fourteen Points), however Versailles specifically prohibited a union between the two, as Germany had to "respect the independence of Austria". The unification was denied, regardless of the fact that Austria didn't want to be "independent".

But actually, one can trace the desire for unification even earlier than that, as early as 1848 when the idea of a Großdeutsche Lösung (unification of German states including Austria) was initially supported, but ultimately abandoned in favor of the idea of a Kleindeutsche Lösung (without Austria).

P.S. Regarding "Hitler's first victim", the Saar plebiscite was in 1935. The Anschluß was in 1938. :P

Btw, The Anschluß in Pictures (http://forums.skadi.net/showthread.php?t=32059).

Nachtengel
Saturday, February 28th, 2009, 04:47 PM
Höhö, your state of mind seems to light up at least a bit, Herr Fischer. You could have added as examples for such "citizens" very prominent Austrian leaders of your own political party, who had tried to unify Austria with the Reich already in 1918/19, and who were very happy with the formation of the Greater German Reich in 1938 through Adolf Hitler, such as Karl Renner and even the Jewish Otto Bauer ...

Then, as also stated correctly by Nordgau already - between the wars, there were many Greater German sympathies --- all mainstream Austrian parties, including the Social Democrats, believed in unification with Germany, and consequently were happy when Hitler - a man originally one of our own, anyhow - made this wish of many a reality.

A speech by Social Democrat chairman of the Council of Peoples Representatives and the National Assembly, Friedrich Ebert illustrates the German determination:
I can't help to think of a rhetorical question... why aren't the Social Democrats today like they were back then? I'd even consider giving them my vote. :D

Ossi
Friday, March 13th, 2009, 08:40 PM
Hmm, the president of Austria admits they welcomed Hitler. So then it's an admission it was consensual. But in some manuals in schools and online sources it's still written it was a invasion and aggression. Here an example:


The source:
http://avalon.law.yale.edu/imt/judaus.asp
They, like the History Channel and other garbage aren't up to date with history. Just look at the WWII documentaries they make there. Half of what they tell is BS, even to Jewish historian ears, to boot.

Nachtengel
Tuesday, June 28th, 2011, 09:53 PM
Life magazine

This series of Life magazine color photos provides a vivid glimpse into the mood of Austrians when they joined the German Reich in 1938. These photos reflect something of the fervor of popular support for Hitler and union (Anschluss) with National Socialist Germany. These images also help to discredit the often-repeated lie that the Anschluss was "aggression" or "rape."
http://thirdreichcolorpictures.blogspot.com/2010/01/austrian-anschluss.html

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_AuPoOCVtSzM/S1kHpakeezI/AAAAAAAABgc/qB0knJXZ6oY/s1600/Klagenfurt%2Bat%2BAustrian%2Belection%2B campaign,%2BApril%2B1938c.jpg

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_AuPoOCVtSzM/S1sPkUSiMCI/AAAAAAAABks/D3Y3VXM3t6U/s1600/Happy%2Band%2Bexcited%2Bcrowds%2Bsalutin g%2BGermans%2Bat%2BSchwarzach%2B%28St.%2 BVeith%29%2Bduring%2BHitler's%2BAustrian %2Belection%2Bcampaign.jpg

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_AuPoOCVtSzM/S1sS2ZcP7EI/AAAAAAAABlM/MXd2TQQ9V8M/s1600/Schwarzach%2B%28St.%2BVeith%29%2Bduring% 2BHitler's%2BAustrian%2Belection%2Bcampa ign%2B1938d.jpg

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_AuPoOCVtSzM/S1sRY23ls0I/AAAAAAAABlE/hW8RYXzz_RA/s1600/Schwarzach%2B%28St.%2BVeith%29%2Bduring% 2BHitler's%2BAustrian%2Belection%2Bcampa ign%2B1938b.jpg

MCP3
Saturday, March 17th, 2012, 12:01 PM
Ostmark March 14, 1942: 4 years Anschluss. Graz, Styria, Gauleiter Uiberreiter receives as mainspeaker Dr. Goebbels. Then Vienna Heldenplatz.

_BA7CkGLKX8

Aeternitas
Sunday, June 17th, 2012, 12:05 PM
Some video footage:

OSTMARK Newsreel - The Anschluss - March, 12, 1938

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Das deutsche Wien - Der Anschluß (März 1938)

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German Troops March Into Austria (1938), English language presentation

k6Wa4BL28OM

Aeternitas
Saturday, April 2nd, 2016, 12:00 AM
Some more color photos:

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-8jqgIkc61y4/UUBdlO1_nnI/AAAAAAACgXs/J1VHWxEBU8I/s1600/Old+Photos+of+The+Anschluss+from+75+Year s+Ago+%286%29.jpg


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Nachtengel
Friday, March 9th, 2018, 10:51 PM
‘Hitler didn’'t intend to annex Austria, then the joyful crowds changed his mind’

Austria’s last breath lasted less than 12 hours. On March 11th 1938, at 7.47pm Chancellor Kurt Schuschnigg told his country that he was stepping down, finishing his speech with the words “God protect Austria.”

At dawn the next day five German divisions marched across the border without meeting resistance. Despite lacking petrol, the invasion rolled along largely as planned. At 4pm Adolf Hitler’s convoy entered Austria. His first stop was his hometown Linz, which lies 80km southeast of the German border.

At 8pm, he spoke in front of a jubilant crowd of townsfolk. It was only upon witnessing this almost hysterical reception, that Hitler spontaneously decided to wipe Austria from the map, Oliver Rathkolb, a historian at the University of Vienna says.

“At first the plan was to install Hitler as head of government for two countries. But then the jubilation of the crowds created a new dynamic,” Rathkolb explains.

Hitler didn’t hesitate for long. On March 13th, he issued a decree of union, stating that “Austria is a part of the German Reich.”

The “Anschluss” between the two countries was to be total – it even meant that Austrians had to switch from driving on the left to driving on the right like the Germans.

Two days later Hitler gave a speech at the Vienna Hofburg in front of a crowd of 250,000 people.

https://i0.wp.com/carinsurancequotessa.info/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/1520498356_Bundesarchiv_Bild_183-1987-0922-500,_Wien,_Heldenplatz,_Rede_Adolf_Hitle r.jpg?w=640&ssl=1

“As Führer and Chancellor of the German nation and Reich, I announce before history the entry of my homeland into the German empire,” he proclaimed.

The Nazis announced a referendum for April 10th in which Austrians would vote on whether to legalize “Anschluss”, but it was a pure formality.

Anschluss between Germany and Austria was a violation of the Treaty of Versailles, but it was met with little condemnation from the great powers.

“It was the biggest mistake that Paris, London and Washington made that they didn’t recognize that Austria was just the start of the aggression. Anschluss should have been a wake up call,” argues Rathkolb.

Indeed, union with Austria was just the first stage in Hitler’s plan, which led a year later to the invasion of Czechoslovakia. In the Alpine state he found what he needed to equip himself for further expansion. Austria’s national bank was rich in gold and foreign currency. The mountains contained ore and there was oil in the Marchfeld region.

The Nazis were well aware that, despite the jubilant crowds at Hitler’s speeches, far from all Austrians welcomed their entry.

In the first weeks after March 11th they arrested between 50,000 and 80,000 political opponents. The first train from Vienna for the concentration camp at Dachau outside Munich left on April 1st, 1938 with 150 prisoners on board.

“The prisoners were full,” Ursula Schwarz, from the Archive of the Austrian Resistance says.

Some political opponents chose to take their own lives rather than face captivity. Jewish journalist Egon Friedell jumped out of a third storey window shortly before he was to be arrested.

The annexation also unleashed a wave of anti-Semitic vitriol. Viennese looked on as Jews were forced to erase political slogans from the street and city walls.

“Centuries of bottled up resentment were unleashed,” says Rathkolb.

It wasn’t the capital Vienna that Hitler cared about most. He had great plans for his hometown Linz. He had gone to school there and planned to die there too. But before that happened he wanted to make it a city fit to be the burial place for a Führer.

“There was no other city that the Nazis had such grand architectural plans for except Berlin,” says Peter März, a curator at the Linz museum.

Among the plans were a steel plant named after Hermann Göring, a retirement home for Hitler at the city palace, and a museum dedicated to his achievements.

It also wasn’t long before Linz had its own concentration camp. In August the first prisoners were taken to the camp at Mauthausen.

For decades after the war Austria preferred to see itself as “the first victim of the Nazis”, despite its complicity in war crimes and the jubilation with which Hitler was received 80 years ago.

“The victim story was a form of absolution and self-deception. It was a way of deflecting blame from everyone who was involved,” says Rathkolb.
https://carinsurancequotessa.info/hi...nged-his-mind/ (https://carinsurancequotessa.info/hitler-didnt-intend-to-annex-austria-then-the-joyful-crowds-changed-his-mind/)

Aelfgar
Saturday, March 17th, 2018, 10:54 PM
An interesting thread of nice material. I'll add this photo of the rather biased voting paper :)

https://qph.ec.quoracdn.net/main-qimg-baf3afe3b3d4a80bc2c1adf0b4fad716-c