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Siegmund
Thursday, February 10th, 2005, 07:05 AM
For an interesting illustration of the difference between the Germanic and the Latinate vocabularies in the English language, compare the following two versions of the Christian Lord's Prayer. The first is a direct translation of one of the original Old English versions; the second, a version substituting Latin-derived words for words of Germanic origin.

Anglo-Saxon:


Our Father, thou that art in Heaven,
Be thine name hallowed
to become thine reach
come forth thine will
on earth so also in Heaven.
Our daily loaf give us today
and forgive us our guilt
and lead thou us not to swenk
but set us truly free from evil
Latinate:


Our paternal parent who resides in the Empyrean Sphere,
May your name experience sanctification.
May the final establishment of your realm eventually come to pass.
May your intentions be realized,
In the terrestrial sphere as in the celestial one.
Supply us presently with our diurnal sustenance,
And absolve us from culpability caused by our misconduct,
As we absolve and pardon those that commit transgressions affecting us.
And avoid guiding us into tempting situations,
But liberate us from infernal iniquity.
Courtesy of Lowlands-L.

Siegfried
Thursday, February 10th, 2005, 08:38 AM
English may be the most Romanized of all Germanic tongues.

Theudanaz
Thursday, February 10th, 2005, 10:27 AM
Nice. Missing in the English one is the phrase "as we forgive our guilters" (my 'literal' translation of swaswa we forgyfath urum gyltendum if I have it right)

Interesting that so many basic words have been lost in modern english. Even some sense of do have been replaced with latinate act, deed with fact, etc.


For an interesting illustration of the difference between the Germanic and the Latinate vocabularies in the English language, compare the following two versions of the Christian Lord's Prayer. The first is a direct translation of one of the original Old English versions; the second, a version substituting Latin-derived words for words of Germanic origin.

Anglo-Saxon:

Latinate:


Courtesy of Lowlands-L.

Siegmund
Thursday, February 10th, 2005, 10:39 AM
Nice. Missing in the English one is the phrase "as we forgive our guilters" (my 'literal' translation of swaswa we forgyfath urum gyltendum if I have it right)
Good catch! :) Going back to my source, I find that the translation for "swa swa we forgyfaš urum gyltendum" is indeed missing...

Sigel
Thursday, February 10th, 2005, 12:43 PM
Our - - who - in the - -,
May your name - -.
May the - - of your - - come to pass.
May your - be -,
In the - - as in the - one.
- us - with our - -,
And - us from - - by our -,
As we - and - those that - - - us.
And - - us into - -,
But - us from - -.

mmm... looks like we still need the 'bond' of our base Germanic to hold it all together though.