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Milesian
Tuesday, December 7th, 2004, 02:16 PM
I noticed a while ago that one or two members from North America used the spelling Scott when referring to people from Scotland. Some even spelt the country as Scottland.

Properly both nation and inhabitant only have one "t".
It is only ever spelt as "Scott" in terms of it's use as a surname (and sometimes as a first name). "Scottland" is never used.

At first I assumed a spelling mistake but I've seen it now many times by many different North Americans and I wondered if it is perhaps a spelling variation (as there are numerous examples between Amercian English and UK English)


In case anyone thinks I'm nitpicking, I'm not (which would be rich coming from me as my online spelling is atrocious due to the fact I don't bother looking at the screen when I type :D) ). I am genuinely curious about this.

Phlegethon
Tuesday, December 7th, 2004, 02:36 PM
Well, in German it is Schottland. Either you came across a Northern European forum neonutzi or the non-existent American educational system is to blame. ;)

Milesian
Tuesday, December 7th, 2004, 02:48 PM
Well, in German it is Schottland. Either you came across a Northern European forum neonutzi or the non-existent American educational system is to blame. ;)

So you reckon it may in fact be American-German as opposed to American English? ;)

Best just to use Alba then to avoid confusion.....unless one confuses it with Albion in which case ........ah, forget it! :lol

Allenson
Tuesday, December 7th, 2004, 05:22 PM
Must have been just typos, Milesian....or the other thing that Phleg mentioned.

The smartest of us here are self-educated. ;)

Appalachian
Tuesday, December 7th, 2004, 05:27 PM
It's Scotland in American English. The people and language are Scots, and the adjectival form is Scottish, just as in British English, I believe. The only variation I know is that most Americans refer to Ulstermen as Scotch-Irish.

I have seen Germans writing in English who have used a geminate t by mistake.

Could be the fault of the non-existant German education system. :anieyes

:kiss America loves you, Phlegethon.

Telperion
Tuesday, December 7th, 2004, 05:41 PM
I noticed a while ago that one or two members from North America used the spelling Scott when referring to people from Scotland. Some even spelt the country as Scottland.

Am I right in guessing that most or all of such people are less than 30? I ask because it was about 30 years ago (at least) that the education system on this side of the pond began to deteriorate markedly. Personally, I had to teach myself English spelling and grammar, because it was never formally taught to me in school.

Esther_Helena
Wednesday, December 8th, 2004, 02:06 AM
Scots are from Scotland.
Bad spellers come from America, apparently. You should see what some of us name children :-O
Scott is a surname, a male first name, as well as toilet paper. (and paper towels, etc)

Triglav
Wednesday, December 8th, 2004, 06:14 AM
Scots are from Scotland.
Bad spellers come from America, apparently. You should see what some of us name children :-O
Scott is a surname, a male first name, as well as toilet paper. (and paper towels, etc)
And Scotch is an adhesive tape. ;)

In 1921 the 3M Company hired a Mr. Richard Drew as a lab technician and put him to work in improving their products. One day Drew watched a painter spraying a car on which he had used gummed Kraft paper to cover up details he didn�t want painted. However, when the painter attempted to remove the gummed paper, it stripped the paint away with it.

Drew promised the painter that he�d work on an adhesive which would leave a clean demarcation line. In time he produced a 2 inch wide masking tape with adhesive on each edge which he delivered to the auto painter. To quote the article:


While testing Mr. Drew�s first product. . . the painter watched it fall off as he was preparing to apply the second color of a two-tone car. The tape came loose because it was not fully coated with adhesive. It had only a 1/2" wide strip of adhesive along each edge, a money saving measure. The painter angrily told Mr. Drew, "Take this back to your stingy Scotch bosses and tell them to put more adhesive on it." This ethnic slur regarding Scottish thrift may have been unjustified, but it eventually got him the stickier tape he wanted. The name "Scotch" has "stuck" ever since.

AngryPotato
Wednesday, December 8th, 2004, 10:36 AM
Unfortunately the American public school system is worthless and offers no sort of imposed education. If we can put aside that idea that our public school system is a brain washing machine to create judeoliberal nation of obese, drooling retards, I'd like to say that you can make something of the system that does exist. It just doesn't force you to learn, it is our choice of whether or not we do learn. I didn't learn to read till 3rd grade, I put most of that blame on my parents, but that is truly sickening. If I ever have a little one the child will be schooled @ home.

And we do spell it Scots, Scotland. Just a simple mistake. We tend to spell things as we say them and Scott is much more common to us than Scot. I've also noticed a greater switch to 'eh' and z use, outside of the internet.