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+Suomut+
Friday, November 5th, 2004, 09:07 PM
Below is information on the old New Sweden Colony in 17th Century America. My primary source of information on all of the below has been The Encyclopedia Americana, 1957, s.v....various (specifics available upon request).

http://forums.skadi.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=14475&stc=1

New Sweden 1638-1655

The Swedes Along the Delaware.--Even so [see link below], New Netherland was strong enough to conquer a little colony which Sweden had planted on the banks of the Delaware River in 1638. The patron of this project was the celebrated Chancellor Axel Oxenstierna, head of the regency during the minority of Queen Christina, who in 1637 influenced the founding of a trading and colonizing agency, the New South Company, giving it a land grant in the area of Delaware Bay. Fort Christina at the present site of Wilmington, Delaware was erected in 1638, and Fort Gottenberg was built in 1643, 15 miles above Fort Christina. Two competent governors, Peter Minuit and Johan Printz, successfully ruled the fur traders and farmers who made up most of New Sweden's population of 400 persons. The Dutch always regarded New Sweden as an encroachment upon land that was rightfully theirs. In 1655 the governor of New Netherland, Peter Stuyvesant, led an expedition to the Swedish forts on the Delaware, captured them with ease, and incorporated them into the Dutch colony.


Info. on the American New Netherland Colony here: http://forums.skadi.net/showthread.php?p=216154#post216154 .

+Suomut+
Friday, November 5th, 2004, 10:12 PM
Moreover on this topic, cf. also here, http://forums.skadi.net/showthread.php?p=181212#post181212 , which includes a map of the New Sweden Colony here: http://forums.skadi.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=21319 (look between the Virginia Colony & the New Netherland Colony territories).

Frans_Jozef
Monday, July 16th, 2007, 09:12 AM
Perhaps inspired by the riches other Great Powers gathered from their overseas colonies, Sweden too sought to extend its influence to the New World. In 1637, Swedish, Dutch and German stockholders formed the New Sweden Company to trade for furs and tobacco in North America. Under the command of Peter Minuit, the company's first expedition sailed from Sweden late in 1637 in two ships, Kalmar Nyckel and Fogel Grip. Minuit had been the governor of the Dutch colony, New Netherland, centered on Manhattan Island, from 1626 to 1631.

read further:
http://www.colonialswedes.org/

Ĉmeric
Monday, July 16th, 2007, 05:20 PM
I have ancestors from about 8 generations ago who were part of the New Sweden Colony. But I think they were Dutch or German by ethnicity. Many of the "Swedish" colonists were actually German, Dutch or Walloon.

Huzar
Monday, July 16th, 2007, 05:30 PM
Interesting note : today about 5 millions of people in america claim to have a Swedish origin...........

If we think that actually Sweden pop. in Europe is a bit more than 7 millions, it's a notable number.

Ĉmeric
Monday, July 16th, 2007, 07:34 PM
Interesting note : today about 5 millions of people in america claim to have a Swedish origin...........

If we think that actually Sweden pop. in Europe is a bit more than 7 millions, it's a notable number.
Sweden, along with Norway, had a high rate of emigration in the latter half of the 19th century. But not all 5 million Americans claiming Swedish ancestry are necessarily full-blooded Swedes - the Swedes assimilated relatively easy into the Anglo-American population & it has been at least a 100 years since peak immigration from Sweden.

Edenkoben
Wednesday, September 5th, 2007, 07:58 PM
Interesting note : today about 5 millions of people in america claim to have a Swedish origin...........

If we think that actually Sweden pop. in Europe is a bit more than 7 millions, it's a notable number.

This is true of Luxembourgers in the US as well. There is a strong community here in SE Wisconsin.