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View Full Version : Artificially Turning Eyes Blue?



Rey
Friday, October 29th, 2004, 03:38 PM
If scarcity defines value, and blue eyes are a desirable trait for that reason, there would be a big market for a treatment that would turn eyes blue. There must be someone working on it.

However, eventually, blue eyes would become devalued and those who had used them to define themselves in some way would be reduced to squabbling about who's eyes were *naturally* blue.

At first, like a cell phone ten years ago, paying $30,000 to get the gene therapy to ensure your child is born blue-eyed would be a valid status symbol. But then competition lowers the cost and all of a sudden anyone can have it.

For now there are rumors that raw food diets can change iris color.

http://www.living-foods.com/articles/eyecolor.html
http://www.rawpaleodiet.org/iris-color-change-1.html

Perhaps this is just part of the marketing strategy for people selling books on raw food diets.

-R

Northern Paladin
Friday, October 29th, 2004, 07:27 PM
There would be a big market for a treatment that would turn eyes blue. There must be someone working on it. Does anyone know who?

The closest thing I've heard of is a raw foods diet. There are rumors that kind of diet can change iris color.

http://www.living-foods.com/articles/eyecolor.html
http://www.rawpaleodiet.org/iris-color-change-1.html

Perhaps this is just part of the marketing strategy for people selling books on raw foods diets.

-R

How about taking one's eyes out and bleaching them. :D

The fact is you can't get blue eyes unless you have blue eye genes.

The Blond Beast
Friday, October 29th, 2004, 09:14 PM
Josef "Uncle Pepi" Mengele tried to change the eye color of children using methylene blue -- it didn't work. ;)

AryanKrieger
Friday, October 29th, 2004, 09:31 PM
Blue eyes are a sign of Aryan racial purity as are grey and green.Now I find green eyes very sexy.:)

She-Wolf
Friday, October 29th, 2004, 09:37 PM
That could explain why some people have different eye colour as they get older.

She-Wolf
Friday, October 29th, 2004, 09:38 PM
Blue eyes are a sign of Aryan racial purity as are grey and green.Now I find green eyes very sexy.:)
My eyes are green BTW ;)

AryanKrieger
Friday, October 29th, 2004, 09:40 PM
My eyes are green BTW ;)
Yes,the most beautiful shade of green that there is.:cheekkiss

green nationalist
Friday, October 29th, 2004, 10:57 PM
Isnt the blue gene recessive? If a Brown eyed person mated with a blue eyed person, would the brown eye be dominant?

Would this eventually mean inevitable extiction for Aryans if we did not keep to blue eyed partners?

AryanKrieger
Friday, October 29th, 2004, 11:09 PM
Isnt the blue gene recessive? If a Brown eyed person mated with a blue eyed person, would the brown eye would be dominant.

Would this eventually mean inevitable extiction for Aryans if we did not keep to blue eyed partners?
I think you are right. How important it is for green/blue/grey eyed people to mate with each other and so preserve our Aryan genetic inheritance.
Light eyes are a sign of Aryan racial purity-they are something that non-Aryans cannot possess.

SouthernBoy
Friday, October 29th, 2004, 11:50 PM
I'm enraged enough at the Color Contacts.

TisaAnne
Saturday, October 30th, 2004, 12:02 AM
Isnt the blue gene recessive? If a Brown eyed person mated with a blue eyed person, would the brown eye be dominant?What about a person with Green eyes mating with a person with Blue eyes? Do blue eyes become recessive then? Or do the colors always blend to form blue-green? What about eyes that change colors? Mine fluctuate from a bright, almost grass green to a soft blue green and then, finally to grey blue. What does this mean??? :scratch

green nationalist
Saturday, October 30th, 2004, 12:12 AM
What about a person with Green eyes mating with a person with Blue eyes? Do blue eyes become recessive then? Or do the colors always blend to form blue-green? What about eyes that change colors? Mine fluctuate from a bright, almost grass green to a soft blue green and then, finally to grey blue. What does this mean??? :scratch
Its a interesting question and one to which we should all know the answers. Its not just eye colour but hair colour and skin pigmatation as well. Blonde hair is recessive to brown etc so its vital we are carefull where we sow our wild oats!

Unfortunatly I cant find the answers at the moment but im looking:)

The Blond Beast
Saturday, October 30th, 2004, 12:51 AM
The following was posted in the European bioanthropology list:


In basic terms, eye color is determined by the amount and placement of a pigment called melanin that is in the cells of the iris. If a lot of melanin is present, the eye will appear brown or even black. If very little melanin is present the iris appears blue. Intermediate amounts of melanin produce gray, green, hazel or varying shades of brown. Genes work by directing the production of enzymes, chemicals that control all of the processes that occur in our body. Eye color genes, through the enzymes they produce, direct the amount and placement of melanin in the iris. In blue eyes, there is less melanin and it tends to be only in the deeper layers; more light is reflected and the eyes are a lighter color as a result. If the placement of the melanin scatters the reflected light, the effect is the same as it is when sunlight is scattered by particles of the atmosphere to make a blue sky. Newborn babies all have blue eyes because at the time of birth they have not begun to produce melanin in their irises. A baby's eyes may change to green, brown or other colors as melanin production begins. Albinos have no pigment in their irises so the blood vessels in the back of the eye reflect light making the eyes look pink. The light blue-grey-eyed (in association with ash-blond hair) Scandinavians feature the highest degree of depigmentation (albinos apart) found in human population.

Humans produce two types of the pigment melanin: the brown/black type, or eumelanin; and the amber/red type, or pheomelanin.

-Eumelanin is primarily responsible for the color seen in skin, hair and eyes.

-Pheomelanin in fair skinned individuals often adds an orange or red hue to the hair. These people also often have green eyes and freckles (the Irish Brünn phenotype is known for its frequent red-headedness).

The amount of pigment is determined by a number of genes controlling pigment production. Generally speaking, brown is dominant, meaning that if one parent has brown eyes and the other has blue eyes, the baby will most likely have brown eyes. At the present, three gene pairs controlling human eye color are known. Two of the gene pairs occur on chromosome pair 15 and one occurs on chromosome pair 19. The bey 2 gene, on chromosome 15, has a brown and a blue allele. A second gene, located on chromosome 19 (the gey -green eye color- gene) has a blue and a green allele. A third gene, bey 1 (brown eye color), located on chromosome 15, is a central brown eye color gene.

http://www3.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin-post/Omim/dispmim?227220

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/dispomim.cgi?id=227240

TisaAnne
Saturday, October 30th, 2004, 01:00 AM
The following was posted in the European bioanthropology list:But why do some people have eyes that change colors??? :P Is it the way the light reflects off of the pigments that give them the appearence of shade variants? Your article was informative, but I'm a retard when it comes to scientific explanations...maybe I missed something?

Northern Paladin
Saturday, October 30th, 2004, 01:45 AM
What about a person with Green eyes mating with a person with Blue eyes? Do blue eyes become recessive then? Or do the colors always blend to form blue-green? What about eyes that change colors? Mine fluctuate from a bright, almost grass green to a soft blue green and then, finally to grey blue. What does this mean??? :scratch

It's not as simple as reccessive and dominant. Simple Mendelian genetics can not explain the various color variations of human eyes and hair.

What Mendelian genetics can do is give one a rought idea about how inheritance works. In general Blue Eyes are recessive to Brown and Green eyes are recessive to blue. The inheritance of eye and hair color is Polygenic. That is it is controled by multiple genes. As is almost every other trait. Intelligence,Height,Skin Color, ect are all Polygenic.

It is possible for a person who only has brown eyed parents to be born blue eyed. If both his parents have an recessive allele for blue eyes.

Usually eyes get darker with age. The color of the eyes can also change due to changes in Season. In winter eyes tend to get lighter because there is less exposure to light.

Didn't you take High school Biology? My Biology class covered inheritance quite throughly.

The Blond Beast
Saturday, October 30th, 2004, 01:59 AM
But why do some people have eyes that change colors??? :P Is it the way the light reflects off of the pigments that give them the appearence of shade variants?

My eyes, for example, are nominally blue-grey; under fluorescent (white) light, they appear as straight grey; under direct sunlight light blue; and deep blue under incadescent light. You're probably right, in that an individual's eye colour changes with the spectrum of light exposure and is dictated by pigment density distribution.

TisaAnne
Saturday, October 30th, 2004, 02:34 AM
Didn't you take High school Biology? My Biology class covered inheritance quite throughly.Obviously, I didn't pay much attention. ;)

Evolved
Saturday, October 30th, 2004, 02:36 AM
There are actually people who believe if they have blue or green eyes that means not only their parents but all their millions of ancestors going back tens of thousands of years had blue or green eyes too. It doesn't work that way. Eye pigmentation in your offspring depends on not only your & your mate's eye color but that of the parents, grandparents, great grandparents, etc. Example: My grandfather had brown eyes and grandmother had grey-blue eyes. They had 4 children - 3 were brown-eyed and 1 grey-eyed. That is generally the ratio, if a brown-eyed person (who carries the blue gene somewhere recently, i.e. basically any "White" person) mates with a blue-eyed person, 1/4 of their children will be light-eyed (either blue or green).

SouthernBoy
Saturday, October 30th, 2004, 02:40 AM
The percentage is variable.

The Blond Beast
Saturday, October 30th, 2004, 05:33 AM
The traditional view of inheritance as simple dominance is inadequate, as the spectrum of eye colours, for instance from dark to light -- black/dark brown, light brown/hazel, green-brown, green, green-blue/grey, pure blue/grey -- suggests gradational incomplete dominance.

Rey
Saturday, October 30th, 2004, 05:56 AM
Example: My grandfather had brown eyes and grandmother had grey-blue eyes. They had 4 children - 3 were brown-eyed and 1 grey-eyed. That is generally the ratio, if a brown-eyed person (who carries the blue gene somewhere recently, i.e. basically any "White" person) mates with a blue-eyed person, 1/4 of their children will be light-eyed (either blue or green).

That's interesting. Somewhat different from the prediction of the simple 2-gene model illustrated here: http://www.athro.com/evo/inherit.html

-R

Rey
Saturday, October 30th, 2004, 07:24 AM
Usually eyes get darker with age.


That's not true. Eye color usually lightens with age.




The color of the eyes can also change due to changes in Season. In winter eyes tend to get lighter because there is less exposure to light.


That's interesting. I didn't know that, but I could believe it. Just like the body knows to gain a little weight as the cold weather comes on.

-R

Zyklop
Saturday, October 30th, 2004, 08:41 AM
Eye color is more complex than two genes

In humans three genes involved in eye color are known. They explain typical patterns of inheritance of brown, green, and blue eye colors. However, they don't explain everything. Grey eye color, Hazel eye color, and multiple shades of blue, brown, green, and grey are not explained. The molecular basis of these genes is not known. What proteins they produce and how these proteins produce eye color is not known. Eye color at birth is often blue, and later turns to a darker color. Why eye color can change over time is not known. An additional gene for green is also postulated, and there are reports of blue eyed parents producing brown eyed children (which the three known genes can't easily explain [mutations, modifier genes that supress brown, and additional brown genes are all potential explanations]).

The known Human Eye color genes are: EYCL1 (also called gey), the Green/blue eye color gene, located on chromosome 19 (though there is also evidence that another gene with similar activity exists but is not on chromosome 19). EYCL2 (also called bey1), the central brown eye color gene, possibly located on chromosome 15. EYCL3 (also called bey2), the Brown/blue eye color gene located on chromosome 15. A second gene for green has also been postulated. Other eye colors including grey and hazel are not yet explained. We do not yet know what these genes make, or how they produce eye colors. The two gene model (EYCL1 and EYCL3) used above explains only a portion of human eye color inheritance. Both additional eye color genes and modifier genes are almost certainly involved.
http://www.athro.com/evo/gen/inherit1.html

Eye Color Calculator (http://www.athro.com/evo/gen/genefr2.html)

Beside the light issue eye color also changes with mood.

Alpine Storm
Sunday, July 17th, 2005, 11:01 AM
[QUOTE=What Mendelian genetics can do is give one a rought idea about how inheritance works. In general Blue Eyes are recessive to Brown and Green eyes are recessive to blue. .[/QUOTE]
Now I am confused
After reviewing several sites I have read that "Blue eyes are recessive to green eyes" Although I don't have any specific links to post, if you run a search on "Blue eyes are recessive" or somthing of the sort you will find what seems to be several credible sources.

So are green eyes recessive to blue?
Or are blue eyes recessive to green?

QuietWind
Sunday, July 17th, 2005, 06:32 PM
[QUOTE=What Mendelian genetics can do is give one a rought idea about how inheritance works. In general Blue Eyes are recessive to Brown and Green eyes are recessive to blue. . Now I am confused
After reviewing several sites I have read that "Blue eyes are recessive to green eyes" Although I don't have any specific links to post, if you run a search on "Blue eyes are recessive" or somthing of the sort you will find what seems to be several credible sources.

So are green eyes recessive to blue?
Or are blue eyes recessive to green?[/QUOTE]
I don't know if this site has the answer to your question, or not, but this is one of the best sites I have found to explain eye color and genetics. http://www.athro.com/evo/gen/eyecols.html

(I've posted it before on Skadi. Maybe we should sticky it sometime. ;))

fms panzerfaust
Sunday, July 17th, 2005, 11:08 PM
[QUOTE=What Mendelian genetics can do is give one a rought idea about how inheritance works. In general Blue Eyes are recessive to Brown and Green eyes are recessive to blue. .Now I am confused
After reviewing several sites I have read that "Blue eyes are recessive to green eyes" Although I don't have any specific links to post, if you run a search on "Blue eyes are recessive" or somthing of the sort you will find what seems to be several credible sources.

So are green eyes recessive to blue?
Or are blue eyes recessive to green?[/QUOTE]
I think that blue eyes are recessive to green, and green to brown. Someone remember of that afghan woman from National Geographic? She was mixed blood but with green eyes. She appears in two covers from that magazine. I myself already saw mixed people with yellowish skin, some nigger traces in the face, and green eyes (and was not contact lenses). :-O

Iberic
Tuesday, July 19th, 2005, 02:13 PM
There are actually people who believe if they have blue or green eyes that means not only their parents but all their millions of ancestors going back tens of thousands of years had blue or green eyes too. It doesn't work that way. Eye pigmentation in your offspring depends on not only your & your mate's eye color but that of the parents, grandparents, great grandparents, etc. Example: My grandfather had brown eyes and grandmother had grey-blue eyes. They had 4 children - 3 were brown-eyed and 1 grey-eyed. That is generally the ratio, if a brown-eyed person (who carries the blue gene somewhere recently, i.e. basically any "White" person) mates with a blue-eyed person, 1/4 of their children will be light-eyed (either blue or green).
I have brown eyes and my wife has light blue eyes. We have 3 kids and each one has a different eye colour. Brown, green and grey - blue eyes.

Scholar
Wednesday, July 20th, 2005, 04:40 AM
There's something about eye color I love, the fact that no one understands it. My dad has blue eyes (not irish blue, there's no brown in his) and my mom has medium brown eyes. My sisters have the classic hazel (blue-dark green-yellow-brown), my brother has darker hazel (blue-yellow-brown), and I have a weird hazel (medium green with specs of yellow along the center of the iris, not near the pupil). Eye color is another mystery, someone will eventually crack the puzzle...

GreenHeart
Monday, September 26th, 2005, 08:56 PM
What about a person with Green eyes mating with a person with Blue eyes? Do blue eyes become recessive then? Or do the colors always blend to form blue-green? What about eyes that change colors? Mine fluctuate from a bright, almost grass green to a soft blue green and then, finally to grey blue. What does this mean??? :scratch

My eyes are blue and my husbands eyes are greenish-blue, but our son has hazel eyes which can look either grey, blue, green, light greyish brown or blue with brown in the middle at any time. :scratch

æşeling
Friday, September 30th, 2005, 10:29 PM
I have read that blue eyes are a genetic defect due to lack of melanin. Not sure if this is accepted by most geneticists. Although, having blue eyes myself, I can attest to irritation from particularly bright light supposedly caused by this defect.

SouthernBoy
Friday, September 30th, 2005, 10:41 PM
I have read that blue eyes are a genetic defect due to lack of melanin. Not sure if this is accepted by most geneticists. Although, having blue eyes myself, I can attest to irritation from particularly bright light supposedly caused by this defect.
"Defect" is a less charming word for "mutation", so yes. :P

Weg
Friday, September 30th, 2005, 10:48 PM
I have read that blue eyes are a genetic defect due to lack of melanin. Not sure if this is accepted by most geneticists. Although, having blue eyes myself, I can attest to irritation from particularly bright light supposedly caused by this defect.

Strange. I know dark eyed peoples whose eyes are irritated by bright lights.

simplex
Friday, September 30th, 2005, 10:57 PM
What about that terrible red eye we light eyed people get? :)

æşeling
Saturday, October 1st, 2005, 12:27 AM
"Defect" is a less charming word for "mutation", so yes.

LOL. I ain't one for mixing words me!:D


What about that terrible red eye we light eyed people get? :)


You mean camera eye effect? I don't think red eye occurs naturally. Unless someone is possessed!