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Calm Rain
Monday, July 15th, 2002, 02:16 AM
Which are your favorite classics?

Bach, Brandenburg Concertos
Beethoven, the 9th....
Wagner...Parsifal and of course the Ring......

Hellstar
Monday, July 15th, 2002, 02:34 AM
Good taste, do you know any sites where I can download some intelligent classic from?

Parsifal? I know the Russian militant group parzival, they also perform classic, I guess im talking about another thing?

I love Burzum, and old Mortiis, and Igor Stravinsky and some Wagner. and many more.

The stuff I find on fileshare programs mostly depress me,

if any links to sites or archives, would be grandeur.

what is the best symphonies in your opinion,

Zvaci
Thursday, July 25th, 2002, 04:33 PM
My favorite classic composers are Wagner,Mozart,Vivaldi,Zajc,Bethowen,Bach and Weber.

norda
Thursday, February 5th, 2004, 12:33 AM
My favorites are Chopin's impressive "Revolution" Etude
http://www.asahi-net.or.jp/~xr3f-mry/chopet12.html
and beloved Wagner’s Götterdämmerung -monumental anticipation of Europe’s fall.
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/clipserve/B000009ON7001002/0/002-9833795-0112841
Oh I have almost forgotten. Of course "the battle" from Ridley Scott's Gladiator too.

Awar
Thursday, February 5th, 2004, 12:56 AM
Can Orff be classified as classic? :)

Modern video games have some fantastic music.
I recommend music from Medieval:TW.

Perun
Thursday, February 5th, 2004, 03:13 AM
All of Chopin and Wagner. The best however is Wagner's Siegfried Funeral March

bocian
Thursday, February 5th, 2004, 01:05 PM
Chopin( Polish history in music ) Tchaikovsky, Vivaldi's 4 seasons especially winter, currently I'm listening to Debussy. Claire de lune has got to be one the most beautiful pieces of music.

Turificator
Saturday, February 7th, 2004, 01:25 AM
Probably G. Holst's Planet Suite (http://www.aquarianage.org/lore/holst.html)

Evolved
Monday, February 9th, 2004, 05:49 PM
Some I like:
Ludwig Beethoven - Symphony No. 9 (http://www.skadi.net/~ladygoeth/BeethovenSymphonyNo9Scherzo.wma)
(exerpt - [1:15/599kb]:))
Liszt Ferenc - Hungarian Fantasy S.123
(I had this 14 minute song uploaded on my site a while ago, it is a pity if you didn't download it. :( I may put it back up sometime though. :))
Liszt Ferenc - Hungarian Rhapsody No. 10 (http://www.skadi.net/~ladygoeth/Liszt-HungarianRhapsodyNo10.mp3)
(piano solo - [4:53/4.48mb]:))

There are a lot others but I can't think of them right now.. :scratch

Krampus
Tuesday, February 10th, 2004, 02:36 AM
I can't pick one here's a few of my favorites though:

Edvard Greg's, Peer Gynt Suites

Johann Strauss, The Blue Danube(No I don't care if he was Jewish)

Bach's, Toccata and Fugue in D Minor on pipe organ.

Mistress Klaus
Tuesday, February 10th, 2004, 01:32 PM
I can never name my favourite song, but my No1 composer's are Bach & Beethoven...and a whole lot more....he he

Taras Bulba
Tuesday, February 10th, 2004, 05:15 PM
In no particular order

Overture to Tannhauser - Richard Wagner
Ride of the Valkyries - Richard Wagner
Entry of the Guests - Richard Wagner
3rd Symphony "Erorica" - Beethoven
6th Symphony - Beethoven
"Ode to Joy" finale to 9th symphony - Beethoven
Fur Elise - Beethoevn
Jesus Joy Of Man's Desiring - JS Bach
Four Seasons - Vivaldi
Hallelujah chorus of Messiah - Handel
Music for the Royal Fireworks - Handel
Violin concertos - Mozart

And random stuff by Tchaikovsky and Mussogorsky

Scoob
Tuesday, February 10th, 2004, 10:29 PM
These are great works folks. Here are some more of my favorites not yet mentioned:

Bach - Passacaglia et Fuga
Mussorgsky - Pictures at an Exhibition (whole thing)
Liszt- Hungarian Rhapsody No. 2
Chopin - Prelude op 28/15 - "Raindrops"
Rodrigo - Concierto de Aranjuez
Romeo and Juliet overture - Profokiev
Stravinsky - Rite of Spring
Beethoven - Moonlight Sonata

And Opera:
Pilgrim's Chorus from Tannhaeuser (Wagner)
Die Walkuere - Leb wohl, du kuehnes herrliches Kind!
Tosca - E Lucevan le stelle - Puccini
Libiamo Ne' Lieti Calici (Brindis) (I like the lyrics to this)
Sposa son disprezzata (Vivaldi - from Il Tamerlano)
Vogliare Mi Bene (Madama Butterfly) - Puccini

When I consider these wonderful pieces in a racial light, I notice that:
1. The Slavs tend to express deep, deep pathos/suffering in their music - and also sometimes joy and exultation of a type
2. The Italians are masters of the "human" emotions - joy, love, grief, dispair, anger -etc
3. The Germans are good at jaunty "inspirational" music (like Wagner at his best - Ride of the Valkyries, etc) - and also at some stuff that can be really transcendental (like Bach)

Comments?

Jethro Tull
Wednesday, February 18th, 2004, 05:14 AM
Brahms - Symphoniy n1
Brahms - Symphony n3
J.S. Bach - The Well Tempered Clavier (In my opnion the most important musical piece in History)
Strauss - Vienna Blood
Richard Wagner - Parcifal
Richard Wagner - Lohengrin
Franz Schubert - String Quartet No 15
Ludwig van Beethoven - Symphony No 6

Taras Bulba
Sunday, March 28th, 2004, 10:25 PM
Whats your favorite Classical music pieces?


In no particular order:
Overture to Tannhauser - Richard Wagner
Ride of the Valkyries - Richard Wagner
Entry of the Guests - Richard Wagner
3rd Symphony "Erorica" - Beethoven
6th Symphony - Beethoven
"Ode to Joy" finale to 9th symphony - Beethoven
Fur Elise - Beethoevn
Jesus Joy Of Man's Desiring - JS Bach
Four Seasons - Vivaldi
Hallelujah chorus of Messiah - Handel
Music for the Royal Fireworks - Handel
Violin concertos - Mozart

Annikaspapa
Wednesday, April 14th, 2004, 01:17 AM
While I must admit to being a long-time admirer of the Master (Wagner), nothing stirs my inner soul as does the Jägerchor from Weber's "Der Freischütz".

Do yourself a favor and give it a listen!

Annikaspapa
Wednesday, April 14th, 2004, 01:25 AM
Strauss - Vienna Blood

I'm not sure how easy it might be to locate, but the Kings Singers have done a lovely vocal rendition/parody from the perspective of a vampire.
"Wienerblut, schmeckt so gut..." :violin

Annika's Papa

Mac Seafraidh
Wednesday, April 14th, 2004, 04:12 AM
I pretty much like varieties from:
Wagner
Beethoven
Mozart
Tchaikovsky
Verdi
Vivaldi
Rossini
Bach
Brahms

Chop
Dvorak

Handel

Haydn

Liszt

Schubert , etc.

Jack
Tuesday, April 20th, 2004, 02:34 AM
Last I read, 'favourite', not 'favourites' was in the title of this thread ;)

1812 Overture by Tchaikovsky. My favourite classical piece since I was six years old. I'm listening to it now, actually. Brilliant :D

Annikaspapa
Wednesday, April 21st, 2004, 06:23 PM
... jaunty "inspirational" music (like Wagner at his best - Ride of the Valkyries, etc)...
Comments?

Jaunty - Inspirational? - Just watch it behind the wheel:

Wagners "Ritt der Walküren" gefährlichste Musik für Autofahrer
London (dpa) - Wegen seiner Lautstärke und Schnelligkeit ist Richard Wagners "Ritt der Walküren" nach Meinung des britischen Automobilclubs RAC die gefährlichste Musik für Autofahrer. Die Organisation verwies am Mittwoch in der Zeitung "The Times" auf eine neue Studie der kanadischen Memorial University, derzufolge solche Musikstücke die Reaktionsschnelligkeit des Fahrers um 20 Prozent senken. Nach Wagners Walküren stehen "Firestarter" von Prodigy, "Red Alert" von Basement Jaxx und "Insomnia" von Faithless oben auf der Schwarzen Liste. Empfohlen werden hingegen ruhige Lieder. Umfragen zufolge bevorzugen britische Autofahrer jedoch Rock und keineswegs Kuschelsongs.
Für die kanadische Studie führten Probanden geistige und körperliche Tätigkeiten aus, während sie Musik von unterschiedlicher Lautstärke und Schnelligkeit hörten. Ihre Reaktionsschnelligkeit verlangsamte sich den Angaben zufolge, je lauter die Musik wurde. "Es ist wichtig, dass Autofahrer ihre Musik sorgfältig aussuchen", sagte der Psychologe Conrad King. Andere Studien hätten gezeigt, dass sich bei schneller Musik das Unfallrisiko verdopple. Ein schneller Takt beschleunige Herzschlag und Blutdruck: "Ob man sich Oper, klassische Musik oder den neuesten Rave anhört, spielt dabei keine Rolle", sagte King. "Entscheidend ist das Tempo."




Wagner 'dangerous to drivers'
From correspondents in London
April 15, 2004

WHEN Richard Wagner composed his powerful Ride of the Valkyries in the 1850s, he surely wasn't thinking of any danger he was posing to 21st century motorists.
Britain's RAC Foundation for Motoring today named the strident classical piece as the No 1 tune not to play while driving, based on research which the foundation says shows that loud music can cause accidents.
The Dies Irae from Giuseppe Verdi's Requiem was also considered a no-no. The top five list of tunes to avoid while behind the wheel was rounded out by three modern songs - Firestarter by the Prodigy, Red Alert by Basement Jaxx and Insomnia by Faithless.
To help music-loving motorists, the foundation also provided a top five list of songs that may safely be played while driving, "albeit quietly".
Norah Jones's smash hit Come Away with Me was deemed calm enough, as was Mad World by Gary Jules. Other songs on the safe list were Another Day by R&B singer Lemar, Too Lost in You by girl group The Sugababes and Breathe Easy by boy band Blue.

Johannes de León
Wednesday, April 21st, 2004, 06:34 PM
well, i can't pick just one, so here are a few (in no particular order):

Mozart - Rondo alla turca from Sonata No. 11 in A major
Mozart - Requiem (especially the II and III movements)
Mozart - Symphony No. 40 in G minor
J.S. Bach - Toccata & Fugue in D minor
Wagner - Ride of the Valkyries
Beethoven - 7th symphony

Prince Eugen
Friday, May 7th, 2004, 06:12 PM
My best is Antonio Vivaldi 's "The four Seasons"!

Siegfried
Friday, May 7th, 2004, 06:23 PM
Richard Wagner's The Siegfried Idylle, which he composed for his wife's birthday. :)

Agrippa
Friday, May 7th, 2004, 07:07 PM
I chose of my absolute favourites:

Igor Stravinsky - Le Sacre du Printemps
Beethovens 7th and 9th
Wagners ouverture of Rienzi and Liebestod

Zuid-Vlaming
Sunday, May 30th, 2004, 03:43 PM
Canon - Pachelbel (directly inspired by angels, it seems)
Siegfried's Death - Wagner (and the "theme of the sword" in the opers of the Ring)
Trumpets of Aïda - Verdi
William Tell, Ouverture - Rossini

nordic_canadian_male
Sunday, May 30th, 2004, 05:47 PM
at the momment=
CHOPIN- 'So Deep The Night'

Kohler
Thursday, August 26th, 2004, 08:31 PM
My favourites at the moment (in order):

Mozart - Dies Irae
Carl Orff - Carmina Burana
Beethoven - 5th Symphony
Bach - Toccata and Fugue in D minor
Wagner - Die Walküre

Zyklop
Thursday, August 26th, 2004, 08:42 PM
Richard Wagner - Tannhäuser Overtüre
Beethoven - 9. Symphonie

Siegmund
Friday, October 22nd, 2004, 01:38 AM
Are there any Wagnerophiles or Straussians out there? Or aficionados of any of the great European classical composers, conductors, orchestras and performers?

I have a longstanding interest in European classical music as well as an extensive collection of recordings spanning all nationalities and time periods. Is there anyone with similar interests who would like to share thoughts and discoveries?

WestPrussian
Friday, October 22nd, 2004, 11:00 AM
Are there any Wagnerophiles or Straussians out there? Or aficionados of any of the great European classical composers, conductors, orchestras and performers?

I have a longstanding interest in European classical music as well as an extensive collection of recordings spanning all nationalities and time periods. Is there anyone with similar interests who would like to share thoughts and discoveries?Do you play an instrument? Be more specific on the music you like. Are you referring to Richard Strauss or to Johann Strauss?

Siegmund
Friday, October 22nd, 2004, 12:28 PM
Do you play an instrument?
Unfortunately not.



Be more specific on the music you like.
Hmmm. Just about everything. Might be easier for you to tell me what you like. :)



Are you referring to Richard Strauss or to Johann Strauss?
Richard Strauss, his operas especially. (All of them :))

Johannes de León
Friday, October 22nd, 2004, 03:22 PM
Mozart and Beethoven are my favourites, however I also like Schubert, Bortniansky and Campioni.

Including Baroque -- sometimes considered classical -- I wouls also add Bach and Vivaldi as my favourites.

Just a small correction, both Wagner and Strauss are not from the Classical era, but from the Romantic era. :) ;)

Siegmund
Friday, October 22nd, 2004, 04:27 PM
Mozart and Beethoven are my favourites, however I also like Schubert, Bortniansky and Campioni.

Including Baroque -- sometimes considered classical -- I wouls also add Bach and Vivaldi as my favourites.

Just a small correction, both Wagner and Strauss are not from the Classical era, but from the Romantic era.
Quite right when referring to eras. However, I was using the word "classical" in its common usage to refer to the entire genre of formal European music from Renaissance times to today. Thus classical as a genre would stand in contrast to popular, military or trance, to give just a few examples. :)

Of the composers you mentioned, I most enjoy Beethoven and Schubert. Do you have favorite works and recordings for these two composers?

Johannes de León
Friday, October 22nd, 2004, 05:23 PM
Of the composers you mentioned, I most enjoy Beethoven and Schubert. Do you have favorite works and recordings for these two composers? Mozart is still my favourtie amongst them all. :)

From Schubert, I like most Sonatas/Sonatinas, especially Piano Sonata No. 21 in B flat major, D. 960. Also, voice and keyboard pieces are great, such as Nachtviolen, song for voice & piano, D. 752; or Originaltänze (36) for piano (Erste Walzer), D. 365 (Op. 9), his waltzes are also great.

From Beethoven, Piano Sonata No. 14 in C sharp minor ("Moonlight"), Op. 27/2 is simply great. Symphony No. 7 in A major, Op. 92; Piano Sonata No. 8 in C minor ("Pathétique"), Op. 13; Variations for cello & piano in E flat major on Mozart's "Bei Männern," WoO 46 and Piano Sonata No. 23 in F minor ("Appassionata"), Op. 57 are also fantastic.

:)

AryanKrieger
Friday, October 22nd, 2004, 06:54 PM
Are there any Wagnerophiles or Straussians out there? Or aficionados of any of the great European classical composers, conductors, orchestras and performers?

I have a longstanding interest in European classical music as well as an extensive collection of recordings spanning all nationalities and time periods. Is there anyone with similar interests who would like to share thoughts and discoveries?
I am a great fan of Wagner.:)

WestPrussian
Friday, October 22nd, 2004, 09:17 PM
Unfortunately not.



Hmmm. Just about everything. Might be easier for you to tell me what you like. :)That's doubtful...do you mean you like everything indiscriminately from Gregorian chants to Hans-Werner Henze??? For me to like something the composer must be driven to express himself in music...this excludes some musical genres right from the start ;) Fortunately, there is plenty of music like that though...most of it Nordic/German :)


I have a longstanding interest in European classical music as well as an extensive collection of recordings spanning all nationalities and time periods. This does sound as if you really do like everything...my collection is much more limited in scope, and I don't have access to it right now so unfortunately I won't be able to share too much info on good performances.


Richard Strauss, his operas especially. (All of them :))I don't really know Richard Strauss at all. Is he worth knowing? If I recall correctly he's a student of Brahms', but only his earliest works are at all reminiscent of Brahms, and his style is actually more influenced by Wagner. Am I right in that or is he more like, say, Orff? And why do you like his operas and is it worth getting to know them?

Since you like Opera I'll recommend Friedrich Kuhlau's Elverhøj for now. Kuhlau (1786-1832) is mostly known to piano students for his sonatinas which are rather similar to Clementi's. Maybe he is most prominent for his flute music, including solo flute, flute & piano, flute & violin, and flute quartett. If you like chamber music you might as well look into that as there is a lot of good music there; however, Elverhøj is arguably Kuhlau's most enduring masterpiece. It's not an opera but rather a Romantic play, based on old Danish legends and ballads. Most of the music is based on Danish and Swedish folksongs; the orchestration is perfect, and it's a really incredibly beautiful piece of music. Kuhlau's setting of one of the melodies from Elverhøj was later adopted as the Danish national anthem :) This is Kuhlau; he's from Uelzen, so he's probably Saxon or Lombard (as you can see, he lost one of his eyes somehow)


http://www.carolinaclassical.com/articles/kuhlau.jpg

If you're interested, this link provides a brief overview of Kuhlau's life
http://www.carolinaclassical.com/articles/kuhlau.html

Siegmund
Saturday, October 23rd, 2004, 01:47 AM
Mozart is still my favourtie amongst them all. :)

From Schubert, I like most Sonatas/Sonatinas, especially Piano Sonata No. 21 in B flat major, D. 960. Also, voice and keyboard pieces are great, such as Nachtviolen, song for voice & piano, D. 752; or Originaltänze (36) for piano (Erste Walzer), D. 365 (Op. 9), his waltzes are also great.

From Beethoven, Piano Sonata No. 14 in C sharp minor ("Moonlight"), Op. 27/2 is simply great. Symphony No. 7 in A major, Op. 92; Piano Sonata No. 8 in C minor ("Pathétique"), Op. 13; Variations for cello & piano in E flat major on Mozart's "Bei Männern," WoO 46 and Piano Sonata No. 23 in F minor ("Appassionata"), Op. 57 are also fantastic.

:)
Unfortunately, I have never appreciated Mozart as much as Beethoven, Schubert, Brahms or Bruckner, to name only a few. I do love Mozart's Piano Sonatas, especially the recordings by Maria João Pires on DG and Claudio Arrau on Philips, as well as Mozart's Piano Concertos, but that's about it, though I've tried and tried! :)

But I love Schubert's music, especially his Piano Sonatas. My favorite cycle overall is Alfred Brendel's traversal on Philips in the eighties but the most beautiful performance of the great B flat major D. 960 Sonata I've ever heard is a live recording Brendel made 1997. The 2-CD set, also on Philips, includes wonderful live performances of the D. 575, D. 894 and D. 959 Sonatas as well.

The late Claudio Arrau played Schubert's Piano Sonatas with a unique combination of elegance and passion. If a complete Arrau cycle from the 1970s were available, I would snap it up in an instant!

Less well known but still enchanting are Schubert's Piano Trios D. 28, D. 897, D. 898 and D. 929. They can be found on two CDs on the budget label Naxos, as can the equally wonderful Sonatas (Sonatinas) for Violin and Piano D. 384, D. 385, D. 408 along with the Fantasy D. 934. Great music to just listen to, or to have on in the background while composing something beautiful and mysterious oneself, even if only a Skadi Forum reply!

Do you like Schubert's symphonies? With the exception of no. 8 and no. 9, they are vastly underrated and truly delightful. The box set by Karl Böhm with the BPO reissued on DG from the late 1960s and early 1970s is my favorite overall.

The 32 Beethoven Piano Sonatas are, to me, in a special class all their own, genuine desert island music. I have several complete sets, with the Brendel (Philips, 1980s) and Arrau (Philips, 1970s) cycles at the apex of the pyramid. The Sonatas in your list are among my absolute favorites as well. For perhaps the greatest Hammerklavier-Sonate No. 29 in B flat major ever, the early 1980s Emil Gilels recording recently re-released on DG gets my vote, while my favorite recent cycle is without a doubt that of Stephen Kovacevich on EMI.

I also especially enjoy Beethoven's Symphonies, his Piano Concertos, the Violin Concerto and his opera Fidelio. The wartime period Symphonies conducted by Wilhelm Furtwängler are to me nonpareil, and chief among them is the famous BPO performance of Symphony No. 9 in March 1942, perhaps captured best on the Music and Arts label. Two other favorite Furtwängler performances of this greatest of all symphonies are his 1951 Bayreuth (EMI) and 1954 Lucerne (Music and Arts) recordings. Though in general I much prefer Karajan to Furtwängler (especially in Wagner) in the never-ending debate over who was the greater conductor, in my view Furtwängler was much better than Karajan at bringing out the neurotic, at times berserker intensity of this greatest of all composers. For an alternative to these two, Decca just reissued the outstanding Erich Kleiber recordings from the early 1950s on a budget priced 7-CD set. Terrific performances and value!

With Fidelio one also has many choices, but my two hands-down favorites are a 1944 performance conducted by Karl Böhm with a young and gorgeous-voiced Imrgard Seefried as the Marzelline on Preiser and a 1957 performance conducted by Ferenc Fricsay also with Seefried as the Marzelline on DG. Seefried was simply incomparable!

I have a special interest in German performances of Beethoven, Wagner and Richard Strauss from the 1933-45 era, and I have many such recordings in my collection. Favorite conductors from that period (in alphabetical order) include Hermann Abendroth, Wolfgang Brückner, Robert Heger, Oswald Kabasta, Herbert von Karajan, Richard Kraus, Clemens Krauss and Carl Leonhardt.

The sentimental stars in my collection from this period, though not the best, are two 1938 performances of Die Walküre and Die Meistersinger from Königsberg in East Prussia. I sometimes imagine there might be a faint possibility that German relatives from Danzig could have made the relatively short trip to West Prussia for these very performances. Though Königsberg could not compete with Berlin, Vienna or even Dresden in musical culture, it did seem to have a developed German musical history and culture of its own. I've attached a favorite map (originally posted by Stríbog, I think) showing the relative locations of Danzig and Königsberg in case you're interested.

I also have many recordings from the 1920s and even earlier, through the present day. I'm only now starting to realize how much easier it is to listen to them than to write about them! :)

Mistress Klaus
Saturday, October 23rd, 2004, 02:42 AM
:) I listen to classical everyday...both my own CD's & tapes and the classical radio station/s (especially when I am cooking & model building...saves me from having to change the disc's.. :D ).

Bach and Beethoven are my favourites, but I also love Mozart, Wagner, Chopin, Schubert, Vivaldi, Strauss, Brahms. Superior music worthy of thorough study & influential if one is a musician. ;)

Siegmund
Saturday, October 23rd, 2004, 05:04 AM
That's doubtful...do you mean you like everything indiscriminately from Gregorian chants to Hans-Werner Henze??? For me to like something the composer must be driven to express himself in music...this excludes some musical genres right from the start ;) Fortunately, there is plenty of music like that though...most of it Nordic/German :)
Agreed on all counts except your very first statement, simply because there is so much GREAT music. :) Beethoven, Schubert, Schumann, Brahms, Wagner, Bruckner, Pfitzner, Schmidt and Richard Strauss are among my favorite German composers. Favorite Czech composers include Smetana, Dvořák, Janáček and Martinů. Among the Hungarians are Dohnányi, Veress, Weiner and Bartók. The Finns have Sibelius, the Danes have Carl Nielsen (as well as personal favorite Vagn Holmboe among others), the French have Massenet, the Romanians have Enescu, and the Russians have Shostakovich. It's such a big universe, so much bigger than this list, and I feel I have only just scratched the surface. Then when you consider the thousands of incredible performances that have been recorded in the past hundred years, and how they differ in fascinating, complex and beautiful ways from each other, the universe gets even bigger.

I first came upon the genre of classical music in my family with the symphonies of Beethoven and Shostakovich. Later a friend introduced me to the music of Gustav Mahler and Bartók, and then to Schönberg, Berg and Webern, which led in turn to the Darmstadt School of Boulez, Stockhausen and Xenakis and their American counterparts Babbitt and Carter and several DOZEN more like them, both European and American - not to mention the New York School of Cage and Feldman.

As I got older I traveled backwards in time and found much on my own that I had somehow missed or taken for granted in the mainstream of German, Scandinavian, Baltic and Slavic music, which is where I focus now.

Along the way I have, to your point, found much music of inferior quality, at least by the standards of beauty I subscribe to today. Included in this category is much that I would consider artistic and fascinating but also unhealthy and even diseased. I would say that most of what was labeled by Rosenberg and a grumpy Dr. Goebbels as entartete Musik really IS degenerate based on its musical values. The fact that most of this beautiful sick music was composed by Jews is not surprising.

You mentioned the well known Marxist homosexual composer Hans Werner Henze. I know his work, and it is quite intricate and beautiful, especially his chamber works on Wergo 6239-2 and his Piano Concerto No. 2 on CPO 999 322-2. But I do not play Henze often because his musical values are, to me, quite weak, the equivalent of musical masturbation. There is much flamboyant, super-talented ego at play, but little of transcendent value by my standards. But his operas are even worse: they are completely spoiled by his blatantly didactic politics, which can also be said for the vocal works of Luigi Nono and Luciano Berio. All three seem to be working as hard as they can to destroy any hope for a world based on legitimate racial, cultural and individual distinctions and instead create some version of the Marxist utopia, where they would no doubt be found among the privileged (hence bourgeois and well fed) artistic elite! Crétins, tous. But I digress. :)



I don't really know Richard Strauss at all. Is he worth knowing? If I recall correctly he's a student of Brahms', but only his earliest works are at all reminiscent of Brahms, and his style is actually more influenced by Wagner. Am I right in that or is he more like, say, Orff? And why do you like his operas and is it worth getting to know them?
Richard Strauss is absolutely worth knowing. He had a magnificent grasp of orchestration and an unparalleled appreciation for the beauty of the human voice. His love for the sound of the soprano voice was legendary, and most of his 15 operas feature multiple soprano parts.

I do not know Orff, but I know Wagner and Brahms well. Strauss had, in my view, absolutely nothing in common with Brahms but did draw profound inspiration from Wagner in the scale of his artistic canvas and the colors he used to paint upon it, even if his works, unlike most of Wagner's mature operas, did not deal with serious or heroic subjects.

One of my favorite non-operatic vocal works by Richard Strauss is his Four Last Songs, which sadly he did not live long enough to hear performed in his lifetime. I defy anyone to listen to this music late at night, with lights down and candles lit, and not cry for sheer beauty. My favorite performance is a little known version sung by Arleen Augér with André Previn and the Wiener Philharmoniker on Telarc CD-80180, followed closely by the incomparable Gundula Janowitz with Herbert von Karajan and the Berliner Philharmoniker on DG 447 422-2. Each of these budget-priced discs also includes good performances of various orchestral works by Richard Strauss. Each is a recording to treasure for a lifetime.

Back to opera. Two of the earlier operas, Salome and Electra have a searing, berserker intensity that is as magnificent as it is astonishing. Early audiences were stuck dumb at the "barbaric" soundscape, which was a fitting counterpart to the scandalously outlandish librettos. Strauss's next opera, Der Rosenkavalier is perhaps his greatest, his most loved and most beautiful, though the subject is trivial and lighthearted. These three works, along with Ariadne auf Naxos, which is in a similar vein as Der Rosenkavalier, are by far Strauss's most popular operas. You will not go wrong with any of them.

Among the readily available recordings I recommend the following. Each is considered a classic.

Salome - Herbert von Karajan, Wiener Philharmoniker, 1977 (EMI 7243 5 67159 2 9)
Salome - Erich Kleiber, Wiener Philharmoniker, 1954 (Decca 475 6087)
Elektra - Dimitri Mitropoulos, Wiener Philharmoniker, 1957 (Orfeo C 456 972 I)
Elektra - Karl Böhm, Staatskapelle Dresden, 1960 (DG 445 329-2)
Der Rosenkavalier - Erich Kleiber, Wiener Philharmoniker, 1954 (Decca 289 467 111-2)
Der Rosenkavalier - Herbert von Karajan, Philharmonia, 1956 (EMI 7243 5 67609 2 9)
Ariadne auf Naxos - Herbert von Karajan, Philharmonia, 1954 (EMI 7243 5 67156 2 2)
Ariadne auf Naxos - Karl Böhm, Wiener Philharmoniker, 1954 (DG 445 332-2)
Basically, any Richard Strauss opera conducted by von Karajan or Böhm is likely to be a masterpiece. Also, note that these are older, non-digital recordings, with much higher performance values than many modern recordings. The singers, conductors and orchestras were just better.



Since you like Opera I'll recommend Friedrich Kuhlau's Elverhøj for now. Kuhlau (1786-1832) is mostly known to piano students for his sonatinas which are rather similar to Clementi's. Maybe he is most prominent for his flute music, including solo flute, flute & piano, flute & violin, and flute quartett. If you like chamber music you might as well look into that as there is a lot of good music there; however, Elverhøj is arguably Kuhlau's most enduring masterpiece. It's not an opera but rather a Romantic play, based on old Danish legends and ballads. Most of the music is based on Danish and Swedish folksongs; the orchestration is perfect, and it's a really incredibly beautiful piece of music. Kuhlau's setting of one of the melodies from Elverhøj was later adopted as the Danish national anthem :) This is Kuhlau; he's from Uelzen, so he's probably Saxon or Lombard (as you can see, he lost one of his eyes somehow)
Thank you so much for the recommendation! I had not previously encountered Kuhlau, as he lived just prior to my main period of interest, but I will definitely listen to him and get back to you with my thoughts. I appreciate your taking the time to introduce me to one of your favorite composers!

Siegmund
Saturday, October 23rd, 2004, 05:22 AM
:) I listen to classical everyday...both my own CD's & tapes and the classical radio station/s (especially when I am cooking & model building...saves me from having to change the disc's.. :D ).

Bach and Beethoven are my favourites, but I also love Mozart, Wagner, Chopin, Schubert, Vivaldi, Strauss, Brahms. Superior music worthy of thorough study & influential if one is a musician. ;)
If your music has been influenced by any of these, it must be great. :) Though I'm sure you've been asked before, how can one get a sample of your music? Do you have any CDs that are available at retail?

Mistress Klaus
Saturday, October 23rd, 2004, 07:00 AM
If your music has been influenced by any of these, it must be great. :) Though I'm sure you've been asked before, how can one get a sample of your music? Do you have any CDs that are available at retail?


:) I wish my musik had been influenced by classical all along (I have been listening to classical since I was a child...it is surprising!)...but for some reason I kept it sacred & carried forth with metal. :P
I've attached a piece I have done for my upcoming album entitled "Katze Minuet" (unmixed at this stage, dedicated to my cats ;) )...Influences of Beethoven, Vivaldi and Bach can be heard. (this wasn't deliberate at the time... :D )..

My other material, including my past band Niflheim (metal) and some of my softer pieces of Skadheim (my solo band) can be downloaded from my SKADHEIM link on my signature. (links then Mp3's). Folkish female vocals and acoustic guitars etc. ;)
1 demo, 1 CD/album "Myrkvid", 2 video's, 1 vinyl 7"Ep and a gig with Death in June....my only claim to fame.. :D ...I like to do my own thing...getting a record deal was never my priority.. :)

Stríbog
Saturday, October 23rd, 2004, 08:42 AM
Favorite would have to be Tchaikovsky for his sheer volume of inspired work. I also don't think anyone else wrote symphonies, operas and ballets all of such brilliance.

Close seconds would be Wagner, Mozart, Mahler and Schubert. I also enjoy Beethoven, Brahms, Rossini, Prokofiev, Johann Strauss and Rimsky-Korsakov immensely.

Puccini, Verdi, Shostakovich, Dvorak, Bach, Rachmaninov, Liszt, Vivaldi, Corelli, Bruckner, Chopin, Paganini, Saint-Saens, Grieg, Sibelius, Stravinsky, Faure, and Richard Strauss get a lot of playing time as well.

I don't really like Haydn, Handel, Schumann, Bizet, Vaughan Williams or Elgar. Haven't really listened to Berlioz, Weber,Telemann, Purcell, Schoenberg or Webern. Holst, Offenbach, and Ponchielli all wrote good music but had limited bodies of work.

To summarize my all-time favorite select few pieces:

Tchaikovsky - Swan Lake, complete ballet
Tchaikovsky - Sleeping Beauty waltz
Tchaikovsky - 1812 Overture
Tchaikovsky - Romeo and Juliet Overture
Tchaikovsky - Piano Concerto #1 in Bb minor
Mozart - Don Giovanni Overture
Mozart - Requiem, complete
Mozart - Symphony No.40 in G minor, molto allegro
Rossini - Il Barbiere di Siviglia, Overture and Largo al Factotum
Stravinsky - The Rite of Spring
Mahler - Symphony No.5 1st Mvt.
Liszt - Hungarian Rhapsody No.2
Schubert - Ständchen (Serenade)
Wagner - Pilgerchor from Tannhäuser
Wagner - Ride of the Valkyries from Die Walküre

Siegmund
Tuesday, October 26th, 2004, 11:01 AM
:) I wish my musik had been influenced by classical all along (I have been listening to classical since I was a child...it is surprising!)...but for some reason I kept it sacred & carried forth with metal. :P
I've attached a piece I have done for my upcoming album entitled "Katze Minuet" (unmixed at this stage, dedicated to my cats ;) )...Influences of Beethoven, Vivaldi and Bach can be heard. (this wasn't deliberate at the time... :D )..
Finally had a chance to listen... nice!



My other material, including my past band Niflheim (metal) and some of my softer pieces of Skadheim (my solo band) can be downloaded from my SKADHEIM link on my signature. (links then Mp3's). Folkish female vocals and acoustic guitars etc. ;)
I liked all of it, especially The Tomb and Hexenkessel. But I'm most partial to Twilight, since I keep playing it over and over. ;)

Thanks for the links!

Strengthandhonour
Wednesday, October 27th, 2004, 01:26 AM
I have been getting into classical music this last year. Mainly when I started to learn to play piano. I am really into Richard Wagner,Antonio Vivaldi,Bach,Bethoven,Franz Liszt,Chopin,etc and many others. I think classical music is the highest form of music up to this day(even though, I been listening to metal music most of my life)

anti-climacus
Wednesday, November 3rd, 2004, 04:57 AM
In order of importance

1. Ludwig Van Beethoven
2. Edvard Grieg
3. Peter Illch Tchaikovsky
4. Claude Debussy
5. Richard Wagner
6. Handel
7. Antonio Vivaldi

(can anyone fill me in on who wrote the original stabat mater?)

Siegmund
Wednesday, November 3rd, 2004, 05:07 AM
(can anyone fill me in on who wrote the original stabat mater?)
Check this out: http://www.stabatmater.dds.nl/chronolist.html

Hanna
Sunday, May 18th, 2008, 06:55 PM
3IyYqJyc-zk&feature=related



WdxRmcgsKDQ&feature=related

Hanna
Monday, May 19th, 2008, 01:38 PM
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Horowitz plays Chopin Ballade 1


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Dvorak Cello Concerto : Rostropovich Part 1

Both are GREAT pianist

Hanna
Wednesday, May 21st, 2008, 03:04 PM
lzMGzBKRttU

Tchaikovsky's music could be argued as dramatic!



jK7bHaBWPV4


Rubinstein The Great plays Plays Schubert

Both Great Pianist

Siebenbürgerin
Thursday, August 28th, 2008, 10:55 PM
If you had to pick a favourite classical music tune, which would it be?

Mine would be Johann Sebastian Bach's famous organ piece, Toccata and Fugue in D minor.

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SlíNanGael
Thursday, August 28th, 2008, 11:00 PM
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Nachtengel
Thursday, August 28th, 2008, 11:03 PM
It's really hard to pick only one. I guess, The Ride of the Valkyries by Richard Wagner. Wagner is definitely my favourite. :)

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Cuchulain
Thursday, August 28th, 2008, 11:05 PM
I don't know very many, but I've always been a fan of Pachelbel's Canon in D.

Hersir
Thursday, August 28th, 2008, 11:05 PM
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Aeternitas
Thursday, August 28th, 2008, 11:08 PM
I appreciate classical music. I find it beautiful, relaxing and soothing. Here is a list of my favorite composers:
Johann Sebastian Bach (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johann_Sebastian_Bach), German composer and organist whose sacred and secular works for choir, orchestra, and solo instruments drew together the strands of the Baroque period and brought it to its ultimate maturity
Ludwig van Beethoven (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ludwig_van_Beethoven) (1770–1827), German regarded by many as the first Romantic composer, famous for his nine symphonies and thirty-two piano sonatas
Edvard Grieg (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edvard_Grieg) (1843–1907), Norwegian composer who wrote a famous Piano Concerto (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Piano_Concerto_%28Grieg%29) and several books of Lyric Pieces (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lyric_Pieces) for the piano as well as Morning Mood (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morning_Mood) from his incidental music to Peer Gynt (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peer_Gynt)
Joseph Haydn (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Haydn) (1732-1809), one of the most prominent Austrian composers of the classical period, called by some the "Father of the Symphony" and "Father of the String Quartet"
Georg Friedrich Händel (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georg_Friedrich_H%C3%A4ndel) (1685-1759), German Baroque composer who is famous for his operas, oratorios and concerti grossi
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wolfgang_Amadeus_Mozart) (1756-1791), prolific and influential composer of the Classical era
Johann Pachelbel (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johann_Pachelbel) (1653-1706), German Baroque composer, organist and teacher who brought the south German organ tradition to its peak
Franz Schubert (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Franz_Schubert) (1797–1828), Austrian composer, regarded as the first significant Lieder writer, also known for his chamber music, piano works and symphonies
Johann Strauss I (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johann_Strauss_I) (1804–1849), Austrian dance music composer famous for the Radetzky March (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radetzky_March)
Johann Strauss II (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johann_Strauss_II) (1825–1899), Austrian composer who wrote many waltzes (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Waltz)polkas (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polka), known as "The Waltz King", composer of The Blue Danube (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Blue_Danube) and the opera Die Fledermaus (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Die_Fledermaus)
Richard Strauss (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Strauss) (1864–1949), German composer, known for Also Sprach Zarathustra (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Also_Sprach_Zarathustra), based on Friedrich Nietzsche (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Friedrich_Nietzsche)'s philosophy, wrote many tone poems (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tone_poem) and operas (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Opera)
Robert Schumann (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Schumann) (1810–1856), German composer, a significant lieder writer, wrote many short piano pieces and four symphonies
Richard Wagner (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Wagner) (1813–1883), major German opera composer (Der Ring des Nibelungen (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Der_Ring_des_Nibelungen), Lohengrin (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lohengrin_%28opera%29), Tristan und Isolde (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tristan_und_Isolde), Parsifal (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parsifal) among others)
Carl Maria von Weber (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carl_Maria_von_Weber) (1786–1826), German composer, conductor, pianist, guitarist and critic, one of the first significant Romantic opera composersMy favorite classical music piece is An der schönen blauen Donau, by Johann Strauss II, a true masterpiece.

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Siebenbürgerin
Thursday, August 28th, 2008, 11:12 PM
I don't know very many, but I've always been a fan of Pachelbel's Canon in D.
I like it too, wonderful piece. :)

Here a version played by the London Symphony Orchestra.

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Dagna
Thursday, August 28th, 2008, 11:22 PM
Edvard Grieg's Morgenstemning from Peer Gynt.

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Timberwolf
Thursday, August 28th, 2008, 11:26 PM
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<object width="425" height="344"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/GYgJpYyCCd4&hl=en&fs=1"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/GYgJpYyCCd4&hl=en&fs=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" width="425" height="344"></embed></object>

BeornWulfWer
Thursday, August 28th, 2008, 11:29 PM
I was never really into classical music growing up. I could listen to it and enjoy the emotion and the clarity of mind it would give me, but it was no better than a blast of Max Cavalera's genius in my eyes.

It wasn't till I was around 14 years old that my sister and I watched Immortal Beloved (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Immortal_Beloved_(film)) with Gary Oldman playing Beethoven.

Suffice to say I thought the film brilliant (what film isn't with Gary Oldman) and the life and ingenious works of Beethoven inspiring.

This is my favourite.

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Psychonaut
Thursday, August 28th, 2008, 11:39 PM
I generally prefer Baroque music, but I can't even begin to narrow any of my Baroque favorites to a single tune. So, I'll go with Wagner's Tannhauser overture:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GwhP-wY1ROY

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qSARntvmVAM&feature=related

lei.talk
Friday, August 29th, 2008, 10:34 AM
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MockTurtle
Friday, August 29th, 2008, 12:53 PM
My favorite piece of all time is the "Eighteenth Variation" on a Theme of Paganini, by Rachmaninoff.

Thrymheim
Friday, August 29th, 2008, 02:16 PM
Back to Grieg for me, and peer gynt

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My aunt has a Bösendorfer grand piano that was aparantly owned by his girlfriend. Would be interesting if true, it's traveled a lot!

Fortis_in_Arduis
Friday, August 29th, 2008, 02:29 PM
I generally prefer Baroque music, but I can't even begin to narrow any of my Baroque favorites to a single tune. So, I'll go with Wagner's Tannhauser overture:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GwhP-wY1ROY

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qSARntvmVAM&feature=related

Great minds think alike.

The Dragonslayer
Sunday, November 9th, 2008, 06:58 PM
I've loved classical music since I can remember. It started off with scores to epic films, classic crossover, and sacred music. I've been expanding my interests as the years go on. There's nothing quite like Bach, Wagner, Beethoven, Mozart, etc. There are so many CDs out there. What are some of your favorite particular CDs that you feel any classical music lover should have in their collection? Thanks.

Teuton
Sunday, November 9th, 2008, 07:49 PM
Classical music make up a majority of what I listen to.

I love Liszt, Mozart(His Requiem was amazing) and Rachmaninoff, S. Bach and myself(Just had to add that in, I do a little piano composing sometimes.:P) if I had to name my top 5 favorite composers.

Static Matt
Sunday, November 9th, 2008, 07:50 PM
Heres a couple of my favorite pieces.

Boccherini's La Musica Notturna Delle Strade Di Madrid No. 6

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iZVN5Y6dtOk&feature=related

Brahms: Violin Concerto in D Major (third Mov)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=91pOqBcvQ7M

Thusnelda
Sunday, November 9th, 2008, 07:59 PM
I´m not such a big fan of classical music, but I appreciate the work of Beethoven a lot! :)

An other case is Carl Orff. It´s not exactly classical music...he created something of it´s own. I´d call it "epical classical-orientated music". :) It´s just wonderful. So much power, so much emotion! The switching between loud and feebly, between fast and slow. For his "Carmina Burana" he even created an own artifical language! I find his work outstanding and really impressive.

The Dragonslayer
Monday, November 10th, 2008, 05:31 AM
I´m not such a big fan of classical music, but I appreciate the work of Beethoven a lot! :)

An other case is Carl Orff. It´s not exactly classical music...he created something of it´s own. I´d call it "epical classical-orientated music". :) It´s just wonderful. So much power, so much emotion! The switching between loud and feebly, between fast and slow. For his "Carmina Burana" he even created an own artifical language! I find his work outstanding and really impressive.


I'm a big fan of Carl Orff. I love his music no matter what label is tagged on it. It is powerful and emotional. It really hits me. I especially love Carmina Burana. There's nothing quite like it.

I saw that someone made a video using clips from 300 with that song. Check it out.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ujqSTGKYLLw

Vindefense
Wednesday, February 18th, 2009, 05:20 PM
Classical music is a big part in my life. Come to think of it there isn't much out there that I do not like. Some of the modern stuff is pretty good too, as long as they follow the general rules of composing. I find that listening to classical music while I'm working in my shop brings out my best. Some of my all time favorites are:
1. The Planets by Holst.
2. Lohengrin: prelude to act III by Wagner.
3. The Firebird suite by Stravinsky.
4. The Water music suite by Handel.
Then again there is Tchaikovsky's 1812 overture, Brahms Sympony #2 in Dmaj and his Tragic overture #4 in Emin. Vivaldi's Four Seasons. I also listen to alot of classical guitar stuff. Fernando Sor, Terraga, Carulli, Giulani. Stuff composed for Lute by Luys De Navareaz and John Dowland are my favorites.

A good site to find these free is http://www.classiccat.net/index.htm 100% free.

burnitdown
Monday, February 23rd, 2009, 08:13 PM
I tell people I like "classical music," meaning that I like selected artists from Baroque, Classical and Modern genres. Not so much the "new music" or postmodern stuff -- it's kind of trivial, like all jazz, rock, blues and pop.

But, I dig the greats, especially the Germans and wops. Who can ignore Schumann, Brahms, Bruckner, Beethoven, Strauss, Berwald and Mozart? Respighi and Paganini? Even Saint-Saens is a classic, although Debussy has lost favor. I can enjoy some Chopin, but no Mendelssohn or Dvorak.

If you have other friends into classical, share mp3s before you buy. Conductor makes a big difference, orchestra less so.

Marius II
Saturday, March 7th, 2009, 09:42 PM
I love Classical Music (as broad a statement as that really is...)

My favorite is actually Vivaldi, but I'm very into Bach, Chopin and of course Wagner.

Bärin
Saturday, March 7th, 2009, 09:55 PM
To be honest classical music makes me fall asleep... but that's why I love it. :D

Kriemhild
Saturday, March 7th, 2009, 10:06 PM
I like a fair bit of classical and baroque music - Bach, Vivaldi, Handel, Schubert, and Mozart are some of my favorites.

I also love the music of John Dowland (the man playing is not him):
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ladyDetenebrate
Sunday, May 24th, 2009, 02:20 AM
"Classical music" (the music I grew up on) is my favorite genre... though technically I should say that "Classical music" to me also includes Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque, Classical, Romantic, 20th Century, and Contemporary music periods.

Some of my favorites composers and pieces from each era include:

Medieval:
1.) tons of Anonymous Goliard/troubadour music
2.) Hildegard von Bingen (everything she's done is incredible)
3.) Pérotin - Beata Viscera

Renaissance:
1.) Guillaume Dufay - Mass for St. Anthony of Padua
2.) Pierre de Manchicourt - Laudate Dominum
3.) Johannes Ockeghem (all of his masses are nice)

Baroque:
1.) J.S. Bach - Cello Suites
2.) J.S. Bach - Toccata and Fugue
3.) J.S. Bach - Brandenburg Concerto
4.) J.S. Bach - St. Mathew's Passion
5.) Tomaso Albinoni - Adagio in G minor
6.) John Dowland (everything he's done is incredible, especially lute and voice pieces)

Classical:
1.) Fernando Sor (EVERYTHING he's done is perfect)
2.) Beethoven - Symphony No. 7, Op. 92
3.) Beethoven - Symphony No. 3 "Eroica," Op. 55
4.) Johann N. Hummel - Trumpet Concerto in E major
5.) Niccolò Paganini (I love everything he's done that I've heard)
6.) Gaetano Donizetti - Lucia di Lammermoor
7.) Gaetano Donizetti - L'elisir d'amore
8.) Gaetano Donizetti - La fille du régiment
9.) Gioachino Rossini - Il barbiere di Siviglia
10.) Gioachino Rossini - Guillaume Tell
11.) Franz Schubert (I love everything he's done that I've heard)
12.) Wolfgang A. Mozart - Requiem Mass in D minor
13.) Wolfgang A. Mozart - Don Giovanni
14.) Wolfgang A. Mozart - The Marriage of Figaro (Le nozze di Figaro)
15.) Wolfgang A. Mozart - The Magic Flute (Die Zauberflöte)
16.) Wolfgang A. Mozart - Così fan tutte
17.) Maria Theresia von Paradis - Sicilienne (see video below for a beautiful interpretation by the renowned cellist, Jacqueline du Pré)
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Romantic (my favorite period!):

1.) Étienne Méhul (I love everything he's done)
2.) Johannes Brahms - Hungarian Dances
3.) Johannes Brahms - Symphony No. 3
4.) Johannes Brahms - all of his piano trios
5.) Franz Schubert - all of his lieder
6.) Richard Wagner - Der Ring des Nibelungen
7.) Richard Wagner - Tannhäuser
8.) Richard Wagner - Lohengrin
9.) Richard Wagner - Tristan und Isolde
10.) Richard Wagner - Parsifal
11.) Richard Wagner - Wesendonck Lieder (heart-achingly beautiful)
12.) Ottorino Respighi - Fountains of Rome (Fontane di Roma)
13.) Ottorino Respighi - Pines of Rome (Pini di Roma)
14.) Ottorino Respighi - Roman Festivals (Feste Romane)
15.) Alexander Scriabin (all of his piano work)
16.) Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky - 1812 Overture
17.) Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky - The Nutcracker
18.) Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky - Swan Lake
19.) Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky - The Sleeping Beauty
20.) Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky - Eugene Onegin
21.) Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky - Marche slave in B-flat minor
22.) Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky - Symphony No. 5 in E minor
23.) Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky - Symphony No. 6 in B minor Pathétique
24.) Modest Mussorgsky - Pictures at an Exhibition
25.) Modest Mussorgsky - Night on Bald Mountain
26.) Modest Mussorgsky - Boris Godunov
27.) Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov - Scheherazade
28.) Sergei Rachmaninoff (any of his piano works are fantastic)
29.) Mikhail Glinka - Ruslan and Lyudmila
30.) Jean Sibelius - Finlandia
31.) jean Sibelius - Lemminkäinen Suite
32.) Antonín Dvořák - Slavonic Dances
33.) Antonín Dvořák - Symphony No. 9 New World
34.) Antonín Dvořák - Suite in A major American
34.) Antonín Dvořák - Songs my mother taught me
35.) Leoš Janáček - Sinfonietta
36.) Leoš Janáček - On an Overgrown Path
37.) Jules Massenet - Manon
38.) Jules Massenet - Werther
39.) Jules Massenet - Thaïs
40.) Georges Bizet - Carmen
41.) Georges Bizet - The Pearl Fishers (Les pêcheurs de perles)
42.) Léo Delibes - Lakme
43.) Giuseppe Verdi - Rigoletto
44.) Giuseppe Verdi - La traviata
45.) Giuseppe Verdi - La forza del destino
46.) Giuseppe Verdi - Don Carlos
47.) Giuseppe Verdi - Aida
48.) Giuseppe Verdi - Falstaff
49.) Giacomo Puccini - La bohème
50.) Giacomo Puccini - Tosca
51.) Giacomo Puccini - Turandot
52.) Giacomo Puccini - Madame Butterfly
53.) Ruggero Leoncavallo - Pagliacci
54.) Frédéric Chopin (EVERYTHING he has done)
55.) Gabriel Fauré - Après un rêve, Op. 7
56.) Richard Strauss - Till Eulenspiegels lustige Streiche
57.) Richard Strauss - Also sprach Zarathustra, Op. 30
58.) Richard Strauss - Don Quixote, Op. 35
59.) Richard Strauss - Salome
60.) Richard Strauss - RosenkavalierDer Rosenkavalier
61.) Richard Strauss - (all of his vocal works)
62.) Gabriel Fauré - Élégie, Op. 24
63.) Gabriel Fauré - Sicilienne, op. 78
64.) Gabriel Fauré - Requiem in D minor, Op. 48
65.) Éric Satie - Gymnopédies
66.) Éric Satie - Gnossiennes
67.) Éric Satie - 3 morceaux en forme de poire
68.) Edvard Grieg - Peer Gynt Suite No. 2, Op. 55
69.) Edvard Grieg - Lyrics Pieces (one of my favorites, Der Var Engang (Once Upon A Time), Op. 71/1, is in the video below)
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20th Century:

Claude Debussy (any of his piano works are great)
Federico Mompou - Musica Callada
Federico Mompou - Suite Compostelana for guitar
Federico Mompou - Scènes d’enfants
Federico Mompou - Canción y Danza No. 10
Francis Poulenc (nice piano works)
Charles Koechlin (ALL piano works)
Igor Stravinsky - Histoire du Soldat
Igor Stravinsky (ALL of his ballets)
Igor Stravinsky - Tango for chamber orchestra
Igor Stravinsky - Symphony of Psalms
Igor Stravinsky - Ebony Concerto for clarinet and jazz band
Sergei Prokofiev - Lieutenant Kije
Sergei Prokofiev - Peter and the Wolf
Sergei Prokofiev - Romeo and Juliet
Sergei Prokofiev - War and Peace
Dmitri Shostakovich (ALL of his symphonies, especially No. 11)
Dmitri Shostakovich - Cello Concerto No. 2
Gösta Nyström - Sanger vid havet (Songs at the Sea) (ALMOST FORGOT ONE OF MY FAVORITES!)

Contemporary (I don't follow Contemporary as it's hard to hear new works):
Nigel Westlake - Antartica Suite


**I hope this post isn't too offensively long. I really wanted to share all of my favorites from over the years! :)

Steeljam
Monday, June 15th, 2009, 02:13 PM
don't forget those !

saganicwonderings
Wednesday, July 1st, 2009, 12:59 PM
Classical music is near and dear to my heart. I've been studying music for about 12 years now, give or take. My father brought me up listening to Tchaikowski, and when I was little I would ask my mum to put on "Sam Hosky" for me to listen to.

As far as my favourites go... Well, it's hard for me to narrow down that list. Here are the first few tht pop to mind:

Medieval/Renaissance Etc.:
Leonin and Perotin
Dufay
Palestrina
von Bingen
Guillaume de Machaut (Puis Qu'en Oubli is GORGEOUS).
John Farmer

Baroque:
Purcell
Handel
Bach
Telemann
Vivaldi

Classical:
Beethoven
Clementi
Paganini

Romantic:
CHOOOOOOOOOOOPIIIIIIIIIIN. I play Chopin nocturnes religiously. I played his nocturnei n E- for my last piano exam; i'm doing the fantasie impromptu in c#- for my next exam.
Schubert
Liszt

20th Century:
Rachmaninov (I play rachmaninov religiously too - but he's harder than Chopin, I don't really have the span to play his works but I try anyway!)
Shostakovich
Prokofiev (I'm playing Diabolical Suggestion for my ARCT with the fantasie impromptu XD)

Elfleda
Monday, July 6th, 2009, 04:04 AM
I love classical music...Bach, Wagner, Mozart, Beethoven, Vivaldi, Chopin, Strauss...among others.

Cail
Wednesday, July 15th, 2009, 07:56 PM
My favourites are Haydn and Mozart. I prefer XVIII c. music mostly, i think it was the golden age of classical music :).

paganwinterviking
Monday, August 3rd, 2009, 08:54 AM
Tchaikovskij, Bach, Grieg, Wagner, Beethoven.

frippardthree
Thursday, October 8th, 2009, 09:28 AM
Wagner & the Ballet music of Tchaikovsky.

Nordlander
Thursday, October 8th, 2009, 12:06 PM
Anything Wagner in concert ,Der Meistersinger,Tannhauser,Lohengrin ride of the Valkyries,and the Finn ,Sibelius,Finlandia especially. Tchaikovskys 1812 overature ,Peter and the Wolf and Nutcracker

hodekin
Thursday, October 8th, 2009, 02:14 PM
This piece of music for me sums it all up!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oOGs8TtnwoI&feature=rec-HM-fresh+div

hodekin

CambridgeGreen
Monday, October 19th, 2009, 04:22 PM
Beethoven Symphony no. 5, NBC Symphony Orchestra.

conducted by Arturo Toscanini

0w9tpiH0czM

frippardthree
Tuesday, October 27th, 2009, 05:24 AM
The Juliet Letters by Elvis Costello and The Brodsky Quartet

This is Elvis Costello's first venture into classical music.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/c/c9/Julietletters.jpg/200px-Julietletters.jpg

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Juliet_Letters

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8oWXuJ2Kfdo

frippardthree
Saturday, October 31st, 2009, 06:17 AM
Tannhäuser & Parsifal by Wagner

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/9d/RichardWagner.jpg

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parsifal

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Wagner#Racism_and_Nazi_appropria tion

Einsiedler
Monday, November 2nd, 2009, 01:24 PM
Beethoven: 5th, 7th, 8th and 9th symphony
Smetana: Prodana nevesta
Wagner: Rienzi, Tristan und Isolde, Der Ring, Parsifal... Meistersinger (it's o.k.)
Mozart: Le nozze di figaro
Gluck: Orfeo ed Euridice
Rimski-Korsakov: The golden cockerel
Sibelius: 5th symphony

That should do for now.

frippardthree
Friday, November 13th, 2009, 07:08 AM
The Four Seasons (Vivaldi)


The Four Seasons (Italian: Le quattro stagioni) is a set of four violin concertos by Antonio Vivaldi. Composed in 1723, The Four Seasons is Vivaldi's best-known work, and is among the most popular pieces of Baroque music. The texture of each concerto is varied, each resembling its respective season. For example, "Winter" is peppered with silvery staccato notes from the high strings, calling to mind icy rain, whereas "Summer" evokes a thunderstorm in its final movement, which is why said movement is often dubbed 'Storm'.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Four_Seasons_(Vivaldi)

http://www.last.fm/music/Antonio+Vivaldi

http://userserve-ak.last.fm/serve/252/35253463.jpg

Vivaldi - Spring
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-4kTei0XrCs

CambridgeGreen
Friday, November 20th, 2009, 09:40 AM
Johan Agrell - Sinfonia in D-major, Op 1, No.1

Alv27bUv7DU

CambridgeGreen
Tuesday, December 8th, 2009, 05:55 AM
Wassenaer - Concerto "Armonici" No. 1 in G Major

Concerto "armonici" No. 1 for strings and basso continuo in G major

1. Grave

2. Allegro

Performed by the Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
Directed by Ton Koopman

RC1nx8SBA5U

Huginn ok Muninn
Tuesday, December 8th, 2009, 08:54 AM
Beethoven's "Hammerklavier" sonata:

x0hAd2rSV20
meIV8G1bPHs
vkpX_HNUEI8
sg6jQK8DkCc
d7felfOGoZs
TauWURuddFI

Huginn ok Muninn
Tuesday, December 8th, 2009, 07:13 PM
A few more favorites:

From Wagner's Die Walküre, Wotan's Farewell

TAWkrNoEfUE

From Elgar's Enigma Variations, Variation IX, "Nimrod"

npbUFXzGS8c

And Edvard Grieg's Piano Concerto in A Minor

sL_DT4DRxVA
ACpOAT8ZcF0
Fl9H4fxripo

baroqueorgan
Tuesday, December 8th, 2009, 07:52 PM
Von Karajan conducting Radezky March:

FHFf7NIwOHQ

CambridgeGreen
Tuesday, December 8th, 2009, 11:42 PM
Johann Heinrich Schmelzer (1620-1680) - Sonata Preludio Aria Variatio

1. Variatio
2. Gigue

Violin performed by Helene Schmitt.

4f6s84dmx2w

frippardthree
Saturday, January 9th, 2010, 08:44 AM
Beethoven's 5th Symphony
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_4IRMYuE1hI

Moonlight Sonata
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vQVeaIHWWck&feature=related

http://www.beethoven.com/

http://thm-a01.yimg.com/image/8279c2fd37bbef96

frippardthree
Sunday, January 31st, 2010, 07:17 AM
The Classical Debut From Genesis' Keyboardist Tony Banks

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/1/1e/Tonybanks_seven.jpg

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seven_(Tony_Banks_album)

Seven: A Suite for Orchestra is the first classical solo album by Genesis keyboardist Tony Banks. It was released by Naxos Records in 2004. The suite is performed by the London Philharmonic Orchestra and conducted by Mike Dixon. Banks plays piano on "Spring Tide", "The Ram" and "The Spirit of Gravity."


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seven_(Tony_Banks_album)

ambertwilight
Monday, February 8th, 2010, 04:59 PM
ooh theres so many

elgars -nimrod, taveners -lamb,williams -hymn for the fallen,gluck - dance of the blessed spirits,beethoven - sonata for piano and violin.

to name but a few

blessings

ambertwilight

frippardthree
Wednesday, February 10th, 2010, 04:31 AM
Wagner Flying dutchman overture
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uAPwXJ7yZ4c

Wagner's The Flying Dutchman
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=afEgY1z502Y

http://forums.skadi.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=103622&stc=1&d=1265776236

captainblue
Sunday, February 28th, 2010, 11:39 PM
J S Bach Brandenburg Concertos
Vivaldi violin Concertos
Handel's Water Music

frippardthree
Thursday, May 13th, 2010, 08:00 AM
vwcRogFfXEk

IQgjwurgydA

Tom_toms
Thursday, May 13th, 2010, 08:40 AM
Andre Rieu is amazing conductor
Bolero-Ravel
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3-4J5j74VPw&playnext_from=TL&videos=HAJDdQEfRXs

frippardthree
Thursday, May 13th, 2010, 09:49 AM
vQVeaIHWWck

0Gx-N-kdIXk

Amerikanerin
Thursday, July 1st, 2010, 05:15 AM
Handel is my all-time favorite. I find his "Messiah" an endless source of inspiration. And "Music for the royal fireworks" to me is an epitome of Englishness.

frippardthree
Friday, July 2nd, 2010, 09:38 AM
xEF4zH6XHCk

Ehqc17iiBBU

y6hdDOFtW64

fktwPGCR7Yw

Borrson
Friday, July 2nd, 2010, 01:37 PM
Johann Sebastian Bach - Toccata & Fugue in d minor
_FXoyr_FyFw

Sergei Prokofiev - Sonata Op.28 No. 3
4yJYlGFPsHE

Dies Irae - Giuseppe Verdi
2KT8bJoIRHM

frippardthree
Saturday, July 3rd, 2010, 05:08 AM
76RrdwElnTU

BlueEyedBeast
Saturday, July 3rd, 2010, 05:22 AM
Performed during Manowar's set at the 2005 Earthshaker festival in Geiselwind, Germany.

zXSYhI4DA70

Amerikanerin
Saturday, July 3rd, 2010, 05:34 AM
Performed during Manowar's set at the 2005 Earthshaker festival in Geiselwind, Germany.

zXSYhI4DA70


Yes, that was a great concert. I have a DVD. Therion played some Wagner's music too.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NbFcoUPDkIo

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q_mGZ-8dxVc

frippardthree
Saturday, July 3rd, 2010, 06:17 AM
-VcPyK-SSfQ

Schubert
Monday, August 23rd, 2010, 05:36 AM
Let my username speak for itself! Schubert was the logical successor to herr Beethoven. If only the man had lived a full life, his potential was probably the greatest of any composer aside from Mozart.

frippardthree
Monday, August 23rd, 2010, 07:44 AM
IVJD3dL4diY

Nightsideclipse
Friday, August 27th, 2010, 11:19 PM
I am a fan of Grieg (lyrical peices are especially nice) and Debussy.

Excellent stuff!

Ard Ri
Saturday, August 28th, 2010, 03:58 AM
I have mentioned it before, maybe even in this thread, so forgive me for repeating myself, but Mats Wendt's "Eddan - the Invincible Sword of the Elf-Smith" is a remarkable (and enormous - 16 + hours!) piece of romantic classical music. Recently completed, it will remind you very much of Wagner. And you can listen to any or all of it for free: http://www.eddan.net/
or buy downloads at http://www.elyziumclassics.com/
(I am not marketing this, I'm just an enthusiastic fan!)

Northern Paladin
Saturday, August 28th, 2010, 05:11 AM
Beethoven, Bach, Chopin, Wagner, Mozart, and others

I also really like black metal music which reminds me of classical.

frippardthree
Saturday, August 28th, 2010, 08:09 AM
c1iZXyWLnXg

Tannhauser
Sunday, September 19th, 2010, 06:22 PM
I love Wagner - especially Der Ring des Nibelungen, in particular Götterdämmerung and of course while not a part of the the aforementioned operatic series I absolutely love Tannhäuser which is my favorite Wagnerian opera.. Also ranked as my favorites: Bach, Telemann, Greig, Sibelius and Beethoven. To me our Classical music is the height of our Nothern European culture. While I love hard core and metal, to me nothing compares to the Overure to Tannhäuser or the complete Brandenburg Concertos. Simply breathtaking!

Horst Eckel
Sunday, September 19th, 2010, 06:26 PM
Here is some very fine piece of classical music from Anton Bruckner (4 September 1824 – 11 October 1896), an austrian composer known for his symphonies, masses, and motets.

Symphony no. 3 (Sergiu Celibidache's live concerts with the Münchner Philharmoniker)


http://rapidshare.com/files/26743982/AB-SYM3.rar

Neophyte
Sunday, September 19th, 2010, 07:00 PM
At the moment I prefer Baroque chamber music, and I am really into composers such as Biber, Bach, Caldara and Mondonville, to mention a few.

BC2oaSAToRE

Biber really rocks.

Elessar
Sunday, September 19th, 2010, 07:10 PM
Antonio Vivaldi's 4 Seasons are my favorite pieces of classical music.
I'm also a big fan of Mozart, Beethoven, Wagner, and Edvard Grieg.

Neophyte
Sunday, September 19th, 2010, 07:21 PM
6Z5y1I3prLE

In my opinion one of the best works of music ever. From his "Sonata Representativa".

Zogbot
Sunday, September 19th, 2010, 07:29 PM
I love Beethoven. My favourite is without a doubt, Egmont overture, opus 84:

RnR6rgp_OWw

This specific performance of it hits the notes the way I like to hear this masterpiece the most. I love the buildup to 1:45 and then the sudden change in mood.

I like some popular music, but it can't compare to classical. Classical music takes effort to listen to, but when you give it that effort, it is so rewarding and refreshing. Sometimes I come home, set the blinds down, sit on my recliner with headphones on and take 20 minutes just listening to op 84 on loop. After I'm done, it's as if I took an hour nap.

wittwer
Sunday, September 19th, 2010, 08:10 PM
Classical Music is good on occasion. Some composers I would recommend:

1. Bach
2. Mozart
3. Beethoven
4. Handel
5. Strauss
6. Tchaikovsky
7. Wagner
8. Holst
9. Copland

:thumbup

frippardthree
Monday, September 20th, 2010, 05:06 AM
aZD9nt_wsY0

Caledonian
Monday, September 20th, 2010, 05:20 AM
My favorites include but are not limited to: Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata, Mozart's Requiem, Bach's Toccata and Fugue in D minor, and Beethoven's symphony 7

frippardthree
Monday, September 20th, 2010, 05:45 AM
XNmNlWoP-yA

Huginn ok Muninn
Monday, September 20th, 2010, 06:01 AM
I just found this on youtube. Günter Wand is one of my very favorite conductors. He was a late bloomer, but one in a great tradition of great German conductors. His recordings of Bruckner are among the very best, and being recent, sound wonderful as well. Here he is conducting Brahms' First Symphony.

Mw49ChkuxLw

Further parts in related videos...

frippardthree
Monday, September 20th, 2010, 06:14 AM
t894eGoymio

3X9LvC9WkkQ

Matamoros
Monday, September 20th, 2010, 07:03 AM
My favourite composers are Bach, Buxtehude, Handel, Haydn, Mozart, and Vivaldi. :)

frippardthree
Monday, September 20th, 2010, 07:09 AM
7AlEvy0fJto

oDZ4N7QyKFQ

u2W1Wi2U9sQ

QOSg7LFgt6Y

Caledonian
Thursday, October 14th, 2010, 04:52 AM
8Qx2lMaMsl8

frippardthree
Thursday, October 14th, 2010, 05:05 AM
Ue6YxcnJ3fo

Ahren
Thursday, October 14th, 2010, 02:13 PM
CO5qyYlOeWs&feature=related

Qd1a9zky5l0

Niall Noigiallach
Thursday, October 14th, 2010, 02:45 PM
An excellent introduction in learning how to appreciate vertical harmony and counterpoint which our ears have been deafened too by a century of living with purely horizontal harmony.


pVadl4ocX0M

Caledonian
Friday, October 15th, 2010, 02:59 AM
mgHxmAsINDk

z36aWM3jYT8

goeOUTRy2es

ansuz crowning
Friday, October 15th, 2010, 03:29 AM
I like vivaldi and bach, wagner is a little too brassy for me

Caledonian
Sunday, October 31st, 2010, 04:03 PM
YGRO05WcNDk

4C-oiN_KDD0

qa0Z6g1XJkU

OcIMvliWM2I

Caledonian
Sunday, November 14th, 2010, 09:54 PM
Vkse1g9ibnM

Guntwachar
Sunday, November 14th, 2010, 11:32 PM
I love Wagner, Grieg, Vivaldi & Berlioz, the piano parts of Chopin are most outstanding though.

Caledonian
Sunday, November 14th, 2010, 11:34 PM
Rc34Jr9udlU

SaxonPagan
Monday, November 15th, 2010, 12:35 AM
I've made several attempts to get into classical music but it just doesn't do anything for me, I'm afraid :(

Here's Jimmy Page doing his best to help though ...

QZXG0fNUUXs

:thumbup

(Mods - please delete if you feel this is slightly OT)

Northern Paladin
Monday, November 15th, 2010, 01:07 AM
Beethoven, Liszt, Mozart, Bach, Verdi, and Chopin, but before you attack me for liking a slav, remember he was half-French

Guntwachar
Monday, November 15th, 2010, 11:24 PM
I'll have to admit I actually like the music of one Slav, Tchaikovsky.
A lot of his fellow Russian composers disliked his music because he used too much European elements.

Listening to Non-Germanic composers doesn't make you less Germanic in my book.

Northern Paladin
Thursday, November 18th, 2010, 06:13 PM
Listening to Non-Germanic composers doesn't make you less Germanic in my book.

Indeed, I'm well acquainted with this attitude, there are for instance non-Germanic authors who have had a profound impact on me. Music is music, separate from people, who could be nasty little creatures. I just wrote that as a precaution.

Beissreflex
Tuesday, November 23rd, 2010, 08:59 PM
I'm listening to classical music only from vinyl...I've got a few lp's from Beethoven, Mozart and Strauss, Fidelio from Beethoven, for example...this guy(B.) is my favourite classical musician.

Caledonian
Sunday, December 12th, 2010, 05:36 PM
yHqlUTndxQ0

Wulfram
Sunday, December 12th, 2010, 06:09 PM
dj0ByuhuRU8

Caledonian
Thursday, December 23rd, 2010, 03:18 PM
ZTDSd0jQ5PQ

Caledonian
Saturday, December 25th, 2010, 03:55 AM
Cg1dMpu4v7M

fTrP7b2CpOM

ph3h2IJAsgk

Caledonian
Saturday, December 25th, 2010, 08:03 PM
df-eLzao63I

Zi8vJ_lMxQI

King Sitric
Sunday, December 26th, 2010, 12:47 AM
Then Baroque music of George Frederick Handel is sublime ... as well as Bach and Vivaldi !

Caledonian
Tuesday, December 28th, 2010, 04:56 AM
7lC1lRz5Z_s

ansuz crowning
Tuesday, December 28th, 2010, 07:51 AM
Bach, Mozart, Vivaldi, Brahm, dont really care for too much brass though.

King Sitric
Tuesday, December 28th, 2010, 02:13 PM
Here's a superb piece of music from the scarlet priest himself ... Vivaldi!

(The Italian had a ruddy complexion and red hair!)


Enjoy!


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jkftsc8c70o (http://forums.skadi.net/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.yout ube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3Djkftsc8c70o)

or this one

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4hvN0X92K4k (http://forums.skadi.net/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.yout ube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3D4hvN0X92K4k)


The Carol of the Bells

The now very familar festive Xmas tune that features in everything from ads to movies - The Carol of the Bells by Ukranian composer Mykola Leontovych.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FKrx-4Awe70 (http://forums.skadi.net/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.yout ube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DFKrx-4Awe70)

Schattenjäger
Tuesday, December 28th, 2010, 02:16 PM
Gottfried Heinrich Stölzel, composer from Breslau wrote this beautiful piece for celebrating the Holy Roman Emperor's coronation in Frankfurt, Germany

RWW64dq89Yk

King Sitric
Tuesday, December 28th, 2010, 02:33 PM
Strauss superb piece of music used in Kubrick's Sci-Fi masterpiece...
2001 - A Space Odyssey!


Also Sprach Zarathustra...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cWnmCu3U09w



Is man god's mistake .... or is god man's mistake?

Friedrich Nietzsche

Caledonian
Friday, December 31st, 2010, 11:11 PM
aZD9nt_wsY0

Magni
Friday, December 31st, 2010, 11:19 PM
I am sure this has been posted before but it is always worth a listen.


ipzR9bhei_o

Caledonian
Sunday, January 9th, 2011, 11:20 AM
YAOTCtW9v0M

rRgXUFnfKIY

Hilderinc
Saturday, January 15th, 2011, 12:26 AM
-4kTei0XrCs

Es9RgQGw3Gk

QOSg7LFgt6Y

nGdFHJXciAQ

Caledonian
Tuesday, January 18th, 2011, 07:48 AM
LfjD-DQ5REk

ZjwAB7shTlc

Hilderinc
Sunday, January 23rd, 2011, 04:19 AM
OCSevzJQ2-Y
LZCdK9dkeOk
OloXRhesab0

Caledonian
Tuesday, February 1st, 2011, 03:59 PM
N00XKtROddc

Hamar Fox
Tuesday, February 1st, 2011, 04:36 PM
vi_9qH79yas

Caledonian
Wednesday, February 2nd, 2011, 03:55 PM
8BsBbtp4gW4

Caledonian
Wednesday, February 2nd, 2011, 05:38 PM
QOSg7LFgt6Y

Neophyte
Wednesday, February 2nd, 2011, 05:57 PM
eiIDWbbbJus

Hamar Fox
Thursday, February 10th, 2011, 10:04 PM
EM8RlCZP0KQ

Caledonian
Sunday, February 27th, 2011, 01:33 AM
X66fGCBhwzc

Nooitgedacht
Sunday, February 27th, 2011, 11:26 AM
I love classic music in all forms.

What moves me though, is the tango rythm.

The Argentinian Tango: Ole' Guapa (The dance of love) played by Andre' Rieu on YouTube sets my heart on fire. The rythm is just so incredibly intoxicating.

The dance itself is poetry in motion - so gracefull.

I can only thank God that I'm not deaf.

Erlkönig
Sunday, February 27th, 2011, 03:15 PM
J. W. von Goethe and Schubert join forces for pure German grandeur.

VdhRYMY6IEc

Neophyte
Sunday, February 27th, 2011, 08:40 PM
I love classic music in all forms.

What moves me though, is the tango rythm.

The Argentinian Tango: Ole' Guapa (The dance of love) played by Andre' Rieu on YouTube sets my heart on fire. The rythm is just so incredibly intoxicating.

The dance itself is poetry in motion - so gracefull.

I can only thank God that I'm not deaf.

I have recently discovered Astor Piazolla, and I find his music very interesting.

Caledonian
Monday, March 7th, 2011, 05:46 AM
JtA9Js-22ko

Caledonian
Thursday, March 10th, 2011, 08:16 AM
2bosouX_d8Y

Rocky v
Friday, March 11th, 2011, 03:25 AM
Siegfried's Funeral by Wagner. Just imagine hearing the Berlin philharmonic play it right before the end of the war.

Why would you want to go to heaven and hear angels sing when you can listen to Wagner here on earth?:D

Hilderinc
Monday, March 14th, 2011, 03:04 AM
GUKRBeG-sGQ
xrIYT-MrVaI

Hilderinc
Monday, March 14th, 2011, 11:51 PM
Kuw8YjSbKd4
fpG_P7UqCXY
JcUh-ggBfzI
kSE15tLBdso

Hilderinc
Saturday, March 19th, 2011, 09:38 PM
u2W1Wi2U9sQ
I got to listen to this being played outdoors by a local orchestra, and complete with cannon fire and ringing bells. Needless to say, the cannons were much more impressive in real life. :thumbup

8Af372EQLck
VTqlLKBKFhg
iT24krt30gE
W3ILbnHhAzk

Caledonian
Sunday, March 20th, 2011, 12:09 AM
3Nvg8eQnjPs

JSAd3NpDi6Q

Caledonian
Sunday, March 20th, 2011, 01:47 AM
mURZQNpKiLQ

Neophyte
Tuesday, April 12th, 2011, 12:28 AM
pg0m2Pu_-no

Juthunge
Tuesday, April 12th, 2011, 12:39 AM
UUgaRCKD2F8

Hq9MxKvrBa0

TheBlackCross
Tuesday, April 12th, 2011, 01:14 AM
S-Xm7s9eGxU

Hans Adalwolf
Thursday, May 5th, 2011, 08:17 AM
I must second Juthunge, the Concerto grosso, Number 8. in g minor. The feel is very smooth, and hints at the past and future glory of the Germanic people.

Hagendorf
Friday, May 6th, 2011, 10:09 PM
I like Hugo Alfvén, a swedish composer. But Wagner, Mozart, Thaikovsky are good to.

Amerikanerin
Monday, May 16th, 2011, 01:29 AM
Tonight I'm listening to this time after time after time. Whatever I might think of the EU's current policies, this piece is awesome (and originally it had nothing to do with the EU, of course). I particularly enjoy this anthem-like style of performance.

iTsQk7IKyTk

Neophyte
Monday, May 16th, 2011, 06:40 AM
An die Freude has been used in other contexts as well. ;)

076idz3U5Ok

Hamar Fox
Monday, June 13th, 2011, 01:16 PM
QhARR-zmTCE

Thorwald
Thursday, July 14th, 2011, 02:51 AM
Classical music lover here. Bach, Mozart and Beethoven are mine.

I also like classical music that is given a bit if a rock music makeover. Check out this video of Moonlight Sonata: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_XBfZD_Yvl0&feature=mh_lolz&list=LLDhPApVoDbZ4

ozhammer
Tuesday, July 19th, 2011, 02:35 PM
I thank the starters of this thread - It is the Greatest Music Thread here

I will be creating another thread sometime else this year for a Section Called
THE GREATEST MUSIC OF THE WORLD AWARDS

Each year I judge a range of DECENT music with Classical and Opera obviously of common appearance. I am always looking for new tracks to add which are of the high opinion of people here. I will place on 2010s Finalists

My favourites:

Bach- Air on a G String
Shostakovich - Introductions of all his plays
Sibelius - Symphony No.2
Pacelbel - Canon
Wagner - Ride of Valkyries and Flying Dutchman
Satie - Gnossienne No.1, No.5

Satie wonderful - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PLFVGwGQcB0

Though Schuberts Piano Looks quite promising found this one very meditative
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rw_Mm...eature=related

I hope this thread gains a HIGHER PROMINENCE HERE
This is the Music of Nature

Hilderinc
Wednesday, July 20th, 2011, 04:13 PM
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The top rated comment is: wow... looks like it's easier to fly an UFO than playing the organ... :D

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Played on the harpsichord (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harpsichord).

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Note that Richter is playing and conducting.

Lew Skannon
Friday, July 22nd, 2011, 11:04 AM
Frederick the great was not only a great statesman, engineer and military genious:

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Feu denfer
Friday, July 22nd, 2011, 05:43 PM
Amazing! But you left out the in my opnion best one:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uPd14JPA--M&feature=related

(BTW, how do I get the youtube tags to work?)

Amerikanerin
Saturday, August 20th, 2011, 06:13 AM
For the last few days my heart has been beating in tune with this:

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Edhelmann
Thursday, August 25th, 2011, 12:49 AM
Johann Joseph Fux (awesome name)'s Kaiser Requiem
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VMTvBnbLIBA

Van Wellenkamp
Thursday, August 25th, 2011, 06:19 AM
Beethoven is my favorite classical composer. Fur Elise, and Moonlight Sonata. Simply wonderful!!!

Neophyte
Saturday, September 3rd, 2011, 07:11 PM
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Neophyte
Thursday, November 3rd, 2011, 05:12 PM
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Rebel was an innovative composer in his day and well worth listening to. This is one of my favourite pieces overall.

Neophyte
Thursday, November 3rd, 2011, 05:31 PM
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Neophyte
Thursday, November 3rd, 2011, 06:29 PM
Frederick the great was not only a great statesman, engineer and military genious:

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You can get this music on CD and it is really good and recommended. See e.g.:

http://www.amazon.com/Frederick-Great-Concertos-King-Prussia/dp/B000026EDY

Neophyte
Thursday, November 3rd, 2011, 06:31 PM
Tell me what you were thinking for the first two seconds... :D

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HeidiStreich
Thursday, November 3rd, 2011, 08:13 PM
Rehearsing a couple for a December Concert.

Hindemith. Metamorphosis
Constant Lambert- Horoscopes
Both are very German 20th Century Orchestral compositions.

HeidiStreich
Thursday, November 3rd, 2011, 08:24 PM
The Met of NYC is putting on The Ring cycles 2011-2012 season and the staging is amazing. The Valkyries fly. Check out the Video's of rehearsal clips. Very 21st century opera.

frippardthree
Saturday, December 24th, 2011, 06:46 AM
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frippardthree
Saturday, December 31st, 2011, 09:19 AM
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frippardthree
Wednesday, January 11th, 2012, 09:50 AM
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Onbaernan
Monday, January 30th, 2012, 11:43 PM
This is probably my favourite classical piece, though I think its really an early baroque piece.

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A few of my other favourites.. Love most stuff by Bach too, especially Chaconne.

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Irmin
Saturday, April 7th, 2012, 08:53 AM
Jean-Baptiste Lully

frippardthree
Tuesday, April 10th, 2012, 08:23 AM
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olympia
Monday, April 23rd, 2012, 05:39 PM
All of Wagner, but most his "Die Walkure"

North Vinlander
Tuesday, October 25th, 2016, 12:45 AM
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Siegmund
Tuesday, October 25th, 2016, 04:35 AM
Featuring the great Bavarian mezzo Waltraud Meier (http://www.waltraud-meier.com/).

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Nattevind
Tuesday, October 25th, 2016, 06:39 AM
It's not coincidence that exposing classical music to babies/younger children expands their intellect. Should the Norns grant me the opportunity to raise children of my own, they'll be raised on Wagner.

Wulfaz
Thursday, November 24th, 2016, 05:04 PM
The leader is the Hungarian Katica Illényi.

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Wulfaz
Friday, November 25th, 2016, 03:48 PM
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Wulfaz
Saturday, November 26th, 2016, 09:57 AM
I love the Mussorgksky's Pictures at an Exhibition.

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Wulfaz
Sunday, November 27th, 2016, 09:46 AM
Baba Yaga was a witch in the Russian folklore.

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Wulfaz
Sunday, November 27th, 2016, 01:59 PM
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Wulfaz
Sunday, November 27th, 2016, 02:35 PM
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Wulfaz
Sunday, November 27th, 2016, 02:55 PM
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Wulfaz
Sunday, December 11th, 2016, 01:59 PM
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Wulfaz
Sunday, December 11th, 2016, 02:02 PM
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Sven
Friday, January 13th, 2017, 07:04 PM
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Sven
Friday, January 13th, 2017, 07:14 PM
Truely divine, this is I believe the closest we can come to God.

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Wulfaz
Friday, February 24th, 2017, 07:29 PM
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Wulfaz
Sunday, February 26th, 2017, 01:35 PM
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Wulfaz
Sunday, February 26th, 2017, 01:56 PM
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Wulfaz
Sunday, February 26th, 2017, 01:58 PM
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Finnish Swede
Saturday, January 6th, 2018, 05:57 PM
As Finland became 100years old month ago...I will still post this.

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mangog
Thursday, January 10th, 2019, 08:40 AM
Who is the best ?...




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