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Fraxinus Excelsior
Monday, October 18th, 2004, 11:17 PM
The Swiss Mennonite Cultural and Historical Association (SMCHA) (http://www.swissmennonite.org/):

The Swiss Mennonite Cultural and Historical Association (SMCHA) is a nonprofit organization comprising descendents of immigrant Mennonites who came to the USA in the 1870s from what is now the Ukraine. Their ancestors originated in Switzerland passing through many countries in Europe including France, Germany, Austria and Poland on their way to the Ukraine.


Major purposes of the SMCHA are to educate descendents of the Swiss Mennonites on the origin and culture of this group through various cultural events, research activities, maintenance of historic places, etc. There are several thousand of such descendents, many of them located in central Kansas, South Dakota, and other mid-western states.


The Swiss Mennonite home pages are considered to be a work in progress. Improvements are always possible. New materials may be added and factual errors will be corrected. Some materials will be added and some may be removed Suggestions for changes of this nature are most welcome and should be forwarded to a web committee (comments@swissmennonite.org).

+Suomut+
Tuesday, October 19th, 2004, 03:25 AM
The Swiss Mennonite Cultural and Historical Association (SMCHA) (http://www.swissmennonite.org/):<---Good post/site m.g. :thumbup :) I'm of Swiss Mennonite heritage myself, although mine ancestors came to America from Holland. They started out in Schweiz, then went to Elsass, then went to Holland. The founder of that religion, Simons Menno (died 1561), was of course, Frisian and a Christian Reformer; thus, the Mennonite movement was born in Holland. I doubt there are any Mennonites in Holland anymore (I could be wrong)...most modern Mennonites are probably nowadays in North America...thus, the location of the above association.

Fraxinus Excelsior
Tuesday, October 19th, 2004, 04:37 AM
<---Good post/site m.g. :thumbup :) I'm of Swiss Mennonite heritage myself, although mine ancestors came to America from Holland. They started out in Schweiz, then went to Elsass, then went to Holland. The founder of that religion, Simons Menno (died 1561), was of course, Frisian and a Christian Reformer; thus, the Mennonite movement was born in Holland.My Swiss ancestors came from Berne (my Greatx13 Grandfather was Chief magistrate of the city). In 1737 my Greatx6 Grandparents left Switzerland to live in Pennsylvania; they weren't Mennonites, though.:|

I do have some Mennonite ancestry: such as William (Wilhelm) Rittenhouse (http://www.ushistory.org/germantown/upper/mennonite.htm) (my Greatx9 Grandfather), the first Mennonite Minister in the colonies. He was also the builder of the first paper mill in the colonies.

(just figured I'd share all of that ;) )


I doubt there are any Mennonites in Holland anymore (I could be wrong)...I guess there are still some Dutch Mennonites: Doopsgezinde Gemeente Aalsmeer/Mennonite Gongregation of Alsmeer (http://www.dgaalsmeer.nl/)

+Suomut+
Tuesday, October 19th, 2004, 08:46 PM
You and I seem to have A LOT in common m.g.! :thumbsup ;) :)

My Swiss ancestors came from Berne (my Greatx13 Grandfather was Chief magistrate of the city). In 1737 my Greatx6 Grandparents left Switzerland to live in Pennsylvania; they weren't Mennonites, though.That's fascinating m.g.! :-) We have similar ancestral experiences. ;-)

My paternal line is Bernese too. :thumbup :-) My ancestors down that line were rural folk though from the Saanenland. My 7th Great Grandfather left Kanton Bern, Schweiz (for what reasons I know not other than perhaps for religious/Theological {pacifism perhaps being one reason} or for economic reasons {since many Swiss folks in those days were poverty stricken}) and moved to Diedendorf, Elsaß wherein he married (in a Lutheran church) my 7th Great Grandmother, who was a Saanenlander also, in 1705 and therein they started their family (had 6 or more children). They eventually moved to Holland and evidently that was where they became Mennonites. In 1733 they left Rotterdam & immigrated to Pennsylvania "Dutch Country" also. ;-)


I do have some Mennonite ancestry: such as William (Wilhelm) Rittenhouse (http://www.ushistory.org/germantown/upper/mennonite.htm) (my Greatx9 Grandfather), the first Mennonite Minister in the colonies. He was also the builder of the first paper mill in the colonies.Rittenhouse was the 1st Menn. minister & built the 1st paper mill in the colonies 'eh!?!?! :-O Well I'll be dog gone! :thumbsup :-) That's all illustrious, man! :| My above 7th great-grandfather was a Menno. minister too in the 1730s-40s over a church in Penn. :-)


(just figured I'd share all of that)Thank you very much! :-D


I guess there are still some Dutch Mennonites: Doopsgezinde Gemeente Aalsmeer/Mennonite Gongregation of Alsmeer (http://www.dgaalsmeer.nl/)AMAZING!!! So, there still are Mennonites in Holland, although small in #. :-\ That is an excellent site...thanks for posting it! :thumbup :-) I find these quotes interesting and insightful for me, for I did not know most of this:

"Our denomination is at least 450 years old. In the days of the reformation that took place in Europe in the 16th century, the ´dopersen´ (baptists), also called ´mennisten´ or ´mennonieten´ (mennonites), tried to give rise to a radical change in the Catholic church. The person who organized the baptist movement was Menno Simons (1496-1561), a priest in Witmarsum (Friesland)." In English these folks were/are called "Anabaptists" as well as "Mennonites." This the first time I've seen the names rendered in Dutch.

"After the movement was created in 1525 in Switzerland, two main groups were formed: the Swiss and the Southern Germans as one group and the Dutch and Northern Germans as another one. In exchange for freedom of believe and exemption from military service and taxes, the Dutch and the Northern German Mennonites were enticed to areas of exploitation in Prussia and parts of Russia after 1780. The persecution in Switzerland and Southern Germany also drove many Mennonites to America."<--I wasn't aware of these two divisions of the movement. I wasn't aware of Dutch/Plattdeutsch Mennonite immigration to Prussia and Russia/Ukraine. I was fully aware, though, since I am of the heritage, of Swiss/Hochdeutsch Mennonite to America. I do also know that for Swiss-Mennonites in those days, they were persecuted in the 'Protestant' Kantons of the Confederacy for being pacifists & the Kantonal authorities were very intolerant of such attitudes, etc., etc. (long story).

"They feel that everyone has to be able to choose their own believe. They also stand for peace, justice and equality and in general they oppose any form of violence. In the past, many young men refused to do their military service. Mennonites stand for what they say. They won´t swear. As the saying goes, 'Our YES means YES and our NO means NO.'" Ja, this was/is what the Mennonites stood/stand for in part.


http://www.dgaalsmeer.nl/images/personen/menno1.jpghttp://www.dgaalsmeer.nl/images/personen/menno2.jpg

These are the first images I've ever seen of Menno :O THANK YOU! m.g. :thumbsup


http://www.dgaalsmeer.nl/images/voorkant/viertjes1.jpg

Modern Dutch Mennonites still holding strong! :thumbsup Incredible. :O

Fraxinus Excelsior
Tuesday, October 19th, 2004, 09:25 PM
That's fascinating m.g.! :-) We have similar ancestral experiences. ;-)

My paternal line is Bernese too. :thumbup :-) My ancestors down that line were rural folk though from the Saanenland. My 7th Great Grandfather left Kanton Bern, Schweiz (for what reasons I know not other than perhaps for religious/Theological {pacifism perhaps being one reason} or for economic reasons {since many Swiss folks in those days were poverty stricken}) and moved to Diedendorf, Elsaß wherein he married (in a Lutheran church) my 7th Great Grandmother, who was a Saanenlander also, in 1705 and therein they started their family (had 6 or more children). They eventually moved to Holland and evidently that was where they became Mennonites. In 1733 they left Rotterdam & immigrated to Pennsylvania "Dutch Country" also. ;-)
That is very similar :-O. Maybe, too similar...:suspect


AMAZING!!! So, there still are Mennonites in Holland, although small in #. :-\ I also was surpised (as well as pleased) to find out there are still Dutch Mennonites :); I figured that they had all left for the East or the colonies.