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Euclides
Monday, October 18th, 2004, 06:14 AM
Origin of Red Hair in the Scottish Highlands

source : lost

''The term Scottish Highlands refers to the the northern third of Scotland along with islands to the north. This region has the highest proportion of red hair in the world, around 11% by some accounts. Generally, red hair is most common in northwestern Europe, and especially in the British Isles. It is common in Denmark, Norway, northwestern Germany, and the Netherlands, but not in Sweden. There are claims that it is common in Finland and among Finnic peoples living near the Urals. In ancient times, a tribe called the Budinoi, in Russia were said to be redheads. Some geneticists claim that the red hair gene is 200,000 years old and comes from Neanderthals.

There are three different claims about the origins of red hair in the Scottish Highlands. One claim is that it was common among the Picts and has always been there.
Another claim is that it was brought by the Kelts. Yet another claim is that it was brought by the Vikings.

At one time the area was settled by people with Mediterranean skulls. Then came tall brachycephalic Beaker Folk. Hallstatt Nordics from central Europe invaded the British Isles, but didn't penetrate to northern Scotland, which remained Pictish. Celts often had red hair. However, Vikings and Germanics were often described as red-haired too. The Rus in Russia were described as redheads. They came from Sweden, where red hair is uncommon today.

Red hair is very common in the Orkney Islands, an area heavily settled by Vikings and which was even part of the Kingdom of Norway for centuries.

Recent genetic and racial studies claim to prove that red hair in the Scottish Highlands is of Viking origin.

Scottish Highlanders were described by GŁnther as being "relatively purely Nordic." They are more dolichocephalic that many parts of Scandinavia. They are taller than almost any part of Scandinavia. However, they have fewer blonds and more redheads. Their cranial form is more Nordic than most Keltic skulls from Europe.

The evidence is mixed, but it seems that the red hair probably comes mostly from the Vikings. ''

Euclides
Monday, October 18th, 2004, 06:20 AM
http://www.ucc.ie/ucc/chronicon/ocorr2.htm
THE VIKINGS IN SCOTLAND AND IRELAND IN THE NINTH CENTURY

Rhydderch
Wednesday, October 20th, 2004, 02:42 PM
Origin of Red Hair in the Scottish Highlands

source : lost

''The term Scottish Highlands refers to the the northern third of Scotland along with islands to the north. This region has the highest proportion of red hair in the world, around 11% by some accounts. Generally, red hair is most common in northwestern Europe, and especially in the British Isles. It is common in Denmark, Norway, northwestern Germany, and the Netherlands, but not in Sweden. There are claims that it is common in Finland and among Finnic peoples living near the Urals. In ancient times, a tribe called the Budinoi, in Russia were said to be redheads. Some geneticists claim that the red hair gene is 200,000 years old and comes from Neanderthals.

There are three different claims about the origins of red hair in the Scottish Highlands. One claim is that it was common among the Picts and has always been there.
Another claim is that it was brought by the Kelts. Yet another claim is that it was brought by the Vikings.

At one time the area was settled by people with Mediterranean skulls. Then came tall brachycephalic Beaker Folk. Hallstatt Nordics from central Europe invaded the British Isles, but didn't penetrate to northern Scotland, which remained Pictish. Celts often had red hair. However, Vikings and Germanics were often described as red-haired too. The Rus in Russia were described as redheads. They came from Sweden, where red hair is uncommon today.

Red hair is very common in the Orkney Islands, an area heavily settled by Vikings and which was even part of the Kingdom of Norway for centuries.

Recent genetic and racial studies claim to prove that red hair in the Scottish Highlands is of Viking origin.

Scottish Highlanders were described by GŁnther as being "relatively purely Nordic." They are more dolichocephalic that many parts of Scandinavia. They are taller than almost any part of Scandinavia. However, they have fewer blonds and more redheads. Their cranial form is more Nordic than most Keltic skulls from Europe.

The evidence is mixed, but it seems that the red hair probably comes mostly from the Vikings. ''
The most likely primary origin of red hair among Scots is probably the Cro-magnon race. The proportion of red heads is higher among people with skeletal characteristics of this race. If it is of Cro-magnon origin, then it would of course have existed among the Picts.

I find it curious that the source says that red hair is very common in the Orkney Islands; from pictures I have seen of Orcadians I would have thought they were if anything darker than the average Scot.

Glenlivet
Monday, November 15th, 2004, 01:45 PM
Red hair can also be from the Norse. There's also a gradient from less to more red hair from Northeastern - to Southeastern Sweden.

cruhmann
Tuesday, November 30th, 2004, 05:26 AM
It is certainly possible that some of the red hair in Scotland may have come from Celts and Vikings. But with an incidence of 11%, I doubt that all of it came from these sources, since neither of these groups have close to that percentage of red hair. There may be more than one origin for red hair in Europe and elsewhere. Most of it in Norway, Germany and Britain may be from a single source. Who knows, there may have been a race that was entirely red and/or reddish haired at one time, that has been diluted by mixture through the centuries. It seems to be common among Irish UPs. Maybe it is a red-haired race that is the link between Irish and Scandinavian Bruenns, two types that I believe are seperate races, though they may have some common ancestry. It may also be responsible for red hair among the Scotch. One writer, whose name escapes me, wrote that in Wales and southwest England there occurs sporadically a carroty orange-red hair color, often accompanied by Negroid-like features. It is different from the deep red of the Scottish Highlanders.

Edwin
Wednesday, December 1st, 2004, 03:50 AM
The first mention of redheads in Scotland:

Tacitus, Agricola, 11

...For example, in the case of the inhabitants of Caledonia, their red-gold hair and massive limbs proclaim German origin.

*Immigration was assumed here, since German to Tacitus meant beyond the Rhine.

Milesian
Wednesday, December 1st, 2004, 12:14 PM
I would think the Caledonii were Brythonic Celts.
So the origin of their red hair could either be from Continetal Celts from Gaul or the low countries, or it is a trait from the UP inhabitants of Scotland

macgregor13
Thursday, December 23rd, 2004, 12:15 AM
Origin of Red Hair in the Scottish Highlands

source : lost

''The term Scottish Highlands refers to the the northern third of Scotland along with islands to the north. This region has the highest proportion of red hair in the world, around 11% by some accounts. Generally, red hair is most common in northwestern Europe, and especially in the British Isles. It is common in Denmark, Norway, northwestern Germany, and the Netherlands, but not in Sweden. There are claims that it is common in Finland and among Finnic peoples living near the Urals. In ancient times, a tribe called the Budinoi, in Russia were said to be redheads. Some geneticists claim that the red hair gene is 200,000 years old and comes from Neanderthals.

There are three different claims about the origins of red hair in the Scottish Highlands. One claim is that it was common among the Picts and has always been there.
Another claim is that it was brought by the Kelts. Yet another claim is that it was brought by the Vikings.

At one time the area was settled by people with Mediterranean skulls. Then came tall brachycephalic Beaker Folk. Hallstatt Nordics from central Europe invaded the British Isles, but didn't penetrate to northern Scotland, which remained Pictish. Celts often had red hair. However, Vikings and Germanics were often described as red-haired too. The Rus in Russia were described as redheads. They came from Sweden, where red hair is uncommon today.

Red hair is very common in the Orkney Islands, an area heavily settled by Vikings and which was even part of the Kingdom of Norway for centuries.

Recent genetic and racial studies claim to prove that red hair in the Scottish Highlands is of Viking origin.

Scottish Highlanders were described by GŁnther as being "relatively purely Nordic." They are more dolichocephalic that many parts of Scandinavia. They are taller than almost any part of Scandinavia. However, they have fewer blonds and more redheads. Their cranial form is more Nordic than most Keltic skulls from Europe.

The evidence is mixed, but it seems that the red hair probably comes mostly from the Vikings. ''
Here is a pic of my red haired brother. i have dark brown hair and blue eyes

Euclides
Monday, January 3rd, 2005, 02:26 PM
One writer, whose name escapes me, wrote that in Wales and southwest England there occurs sporadically a carroty orange-red hair color, often accompanied by Negroid-like features. It is different from the deep red of the Scottish Highlanders.

Please , try to remember the writer's name.

morfrain_encilgar
Monday, January 3rd, 2005, 04:00 PM
One writer, whose name escapes me, wrote that in Wales and southwest England there occurs sporadically a carroty orange-red hair color, often accompanied by Negroid-like features. It is different from the deep red of the Scottish Highlanders.

Though they certainly dont have Negroid features, some people in the past presumed the Paleoatlantid Berids to show Negroid admixture. I suspect youre referring to a Berid Mediterranean element, for this reason.

Edwin
Tuesday, January 11th, 2005, 06:25 AM
I would think the Caledonii were Brythonic Celts.
So the origin of their red hair could either be from Continetal Celts from Gaul or the low countries, or it is a trait from the UP inhabitants of Scotland

I read somewhere that the Caledonii were Borreby, and connected somehow with the Borreby of ancient celtic austria/germany/switzerland. I think they came up the coast of Britain in the late La Tene, and were the builders of Scotland's vitrified (gallic) forts. Don't quote me though. I can't remember the source.