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+Suomut+
Wednesday, October 13th, 2004, 12:05 AM
Attached is a poll question: "What is the superethnic/metaethnic identity of MOST Frenchmen/women?"

I say mostly Celtic/Gaulish, partially Teutonic/Germanic, & minimally Latin.

Feel free to vote if you wish. This is a public poll, BTW. ;)

Telperion
Wednesday, October 13th, 2004, 12:53 AM
Normandy and Alsace-Lorraine have a strong Teutonic/Germanic element to their ethnic make-up, but these regions are the exceptions within France. The Teutonic/Germanic element of the rest of France was very largely concentrated in the upper classes, which were very nearly exterminated during the French revolution. The vast majority of French people today, in my view, should be thought of as Gallo-Romans, in that they are basically of Gaulish/Celtic ethnicity, but have a language and culture heavily influenced by the Latin south of Europe, with the Latin component perhaps relatively more prevalent in the southern than the northern regions of the country.

NormanBlood
Monday, November 8th, 2004, 06:54 PM
The majority of the French are undoubtably Celtic in metaethinicty/superethnicity. The Teutonic and Latin components are pretty much restricted to certain areas. Normandy and Alsace-Lorraine are for the most part very Teutonic/Gaulish oriented from dialect, to appearance and culture I believe. The south of France is certainly the most Latin by blood and culture. In the early days the Aquitainian region was the region most detached from Germanic Francia. Today's French culture is neither really. In my eyes it is a hybrid culture that is not truly French and the people of France, depending on their region, should seek out their original culture.

NormanBlood
Wednesday, November 10th, 2004, 01:14 AM
Also find it quite amusing to note that most French racialists don't seem to identify with the Latin people. Just compare those in the ANH section to those in the Gens Romana langue d'oïl section. I don't think a single poster there is French in any shape or form, most seem to identify with their Celtic or Norman roots.

Theobald
Friday, March 25th, 2005, 11:56 PM
I voted :

Mostly Celtic/Gaulish, partially Teutonic/Germanic, minimally Latin

Personally, as a French, racially speaking, I feel Celto-Germanic, and culturally speaking, Latino-Germanic.

France is about 60% Celtic, 25% Germanic and 15% Latin.
Anyway this depends on the areas : Brittany is about to be 100% Celtic, Corsica and Provence are about to be 100% Latin and Alsace-Lorraine is about to be 100% Germanic. Of course I speak about the native of these regions (Interregional migrations are important in France). The Germanic elements are largely concentrated in the North, where Franks settled (regions : Nord, Picardie, Normandie, Ile-de-France, Lorraine, Champagne, Centre, partly Pays de la Loire) but also Burgondians (Bourgogne, Franche-Comté, Rhône-Alpes) and Alemanics (Alsace). There are some Germanic traces in the South-West (Wisigoths in Poitou-Charentes, Aquitaine, Midi-Pyrénées). The Celtic element is the strongest in the West (of course especially in Brittany).
So to make it short, the North and the North-West are mostly Germanic with a strong Celtic element, the West and the Centre is mostly Celtic with an important Germanic element, the South-East (Provence and Languedoc) is mostly Latin with some Celtic traces. Anyway nowadays this distribution is less and less true, since interregional migrations are changing ethnic regional identities.


http://property.visitfrance.co.uk/img/france_regions_map_539.gif

Huzar
Saturday, March 26th, 2005, 12:18 AM
I'm from northern italy ; mostly CELTIC with a certain germanic and latin influence. Probably, it's not different fron central France. I consider me like Celtic by blood (culturally a bit romanized:D )

Theobald
Saturday, March 26th, 2005, 12:26 AM
I'm from northern italy ; mostly CELTIC with a certain germanic and latin influence. Probably, it's not different fron central France. I consider me like Celtic by blood (culturally a bit romanized:D )
Well, French and Padanians are brothers. ;)
We are both mostly Celtic with some Germanic influences and a Latin culture.

Aistulf
Saturday, March 26th, 2005, 01:38 PM
I don't know. I know more of the lingual history and evolution of Franks and Frankish to French, but I couldn't really say what the average French person is or what most French are.



I'm from northern italy ; mostly CELTIC with a certain germanic and latin influence. Probably, it's not different fron central France. I consider me like Celtic by blood (culturally a bit romanized:D )
Don't forget about the Langobardians [Longobardi], they were as Germanic as they came - and there are still many that have preserved the beautiful south Scandinavian derived heritage.

You'll still find a lot of Langobardian-derived names in Northern Italy, even in the south from time to time (they ruled over almost all of Italy at some time).

It really depends, in Northern Italy. Veneto, Liguria are probably predominantly (Gaul-)Celtic, whereas Lombardia [Lombardy] and Emilio-Romagna are predominantly Germanic (that is, speaking of the original people and excluding the migrated Southern Italian diaspora).

Theobald
Wednesday, June 15th, 2005, 11:30 AM
It really depends, in Northern Italy. Veneto, Liguria are probably predominantly (Gaul-)Celtic, whereas Lombardia [Lombardy] and Emilio-Romagna are predominantly Germanic (that is, speaking of the original people and excluding the migrated Southern Italian diaspora).
Interesting, what is your opinion about Piemonte (Piedmont), and also Toscana (Tuscany) ?
I guess Friuli is similar to Veneto, with perhaps Slavic admixture, and Trentino predominantly Germanic ?

http://img210.echo.cx/img210/2764/labelanswers6mu.gif

Jack
Wednesday, June 15th, 2005, 01:10 PM
Mostly Celtic/Gaulish, partially Latin, minimally Teutonic/Germanic - They like to think they're Germanics though ;)

Theobald
Wednesday, June 15th, 2005, 01:42 PM
Mostly Celtic/Gaulish, partially Latin, minimally Teutonic/Germanic - They like to think they're Germanics though ;)
LOL. Did you read my post at The Phora about our Germanicness before it was down or have I to write it again ? :D

morfrain_encilgar
Wednesday, June 15th, 2005, 02:04 PM
The ethnic French are Celtic and Germanic, the Britons are of course Celts, and the Occitanians are pre-Celtic Mediterranean with Latin and Celtic influence.

Theobald
Wednesday, June 15th, 2005, 02:32 PM
The ethnic French are Celtic and Germanic, the Britons are of course Celts.Right.


and the Occitanians are pre-Celtic Mediterranean with Latin and Celtic influenceRight, although there is an important difference between Western (mainly Aquitaine actually) and Eastern "Occitania" ("Narbonnaise" on the map below).
Indeed Narbonnaise was conquered in - 122 and there were many Roman colonizers there (and also Greek colonizers before that, Monaco, Marseille and Nice were founded by them), while Aquitaine and Western France weren't really colonized. Also the Wisigoths and then the Franks settled in Aquitaine, and not in South-Eastern France (Narbonnaise); the English also ruled Aquitaine during several centuries.
Therefore I would say South-Eastern French are mainly pre-Celtic Mediterranean and Latin with some Celtic influences, while South-Western French are mostly Celtic with some Latin and Germanic influences.

http://histoireenprimaire.free.fr/images/gaule_romaine.gif

morfrain_encilgar
Wednesday, June 15th, 2005, 02:49 PM
Therefore I would say South-Eastern French are mainly pre-Celtic Mediterranean and Latin with some Celtic influences, while South-Western French are mostly Celtic with some Latin and Germanic influences.

The Aquitanians werent Celtic, their language was related to modern Basque.

Theobald
Wednesday, June 15th, 2005, 03:29 PM
The Aquitanians werent Celtic, their language was related to modern Basque.
But Aquitaine was conquered by the Celts, and the Aquitanians took refuge in the Pyrenees and what is now called Basque country. 4000 years ago the Ligurians expeled the Magdalenians to the Pyrenees and Basque country, and then (during the Celtic invasions) it was their turn.

Huzar
Friday, June 17th, 2005, 07:25 AM
Interesting, what is your opinion about Piemonte (Piedmont), and also Toscana (Tuscany) ?
I guess Friuli is similar to Veneto, with perhaps Slavic admixture, and Trentino predominantly Germanic ?

http://img210.echo.cx/img210/2764/labelanswers6mu.gif
Very good Elsasser;) ! effectively, Padania needs a little clarification........North Italy, was inhabited thousands of years ago, by Pre-Celtic and pre-indo/europeans populations, like Ligurians. Those populations were of Atlanto-Med appearence, phenotypically. Afterly, around 500 B.C. , Celtic -Gaulish tribes, from Central Europe, invaded the area, whom became "Cisalpine Gallia". Celts fusioned themselves with pre-celtic populations, modifing the phenotype in a Central european sense. Gauls-Celts substantially brought in the area, types like Alpine, Borreby, Brunn, Atlantid, and Keltic nordic. My grandfather ("classify the captain" thread:D), could be a good example of an Atlantid type from north-west Italy (or better, Western-Padania).

In the centuries after, Roman empire invaded the area, but they didn't alterate the composition of the area, substantially. After the fall of roman empire, Germanic Longbards invaded north-east, and after, Franks invaded northwest Germanic pop. brought in the country Keltic-Nordic, Nordic, Dinaric types, less or more.

In few words, Germanic influence (a minority of course, in general terms) is stronger in north-east, while Celtic, is stronger in north-west : besides we must note a notable residual of pre-celtic phenotypical element (a bit like the ,relatively, "dark" complexioned people from British Isles) (atlanto-Med component). Indeed, on the Ligurian coast, there is a notable Atlanto-Med or Litorid component, while toward a more internal zone (Piedmont) U.P. types, -Alpine, Keltic-Nordic elements dominate the composition.

Aistulf
Friday, June 17th, 2005, 11:14 AM
Say whatever you want, but there are still a lot of Northern Italians with Germanic(-derived) last names. People just don't recognize them as such because of the romanization of names (from runic script), the latinization of the names themselves and the general stereotype of Italy as a 'mediterranean' country.

Since the founding of "Italy" - the unified farce - the mediterranean culture of the south has been centralized (in Rome) and 'distributed' over the whole country. It doesn't only affect the north, also places in the south in a way.

Todesritter
Friday, June 17th, 2005, 11:24 AM
My best childhood friend was a blond, blue-eyed Italian kid, from a family who would have looked just as well at home in Tyrol; I think they were from this region, and it is easy to imagine their Italian surname as derrived from a Germanic original name.

morfrain_encilgar
Friday, June 17th, 2005, 11:26 AM
Very good Elsasser;) ! effectively, Padania needs a little clarification........North Italy, was inhabited thousands of years ago, by Pre-Celtic and pre-indo/europeans populations, like Ligurians. Those populations were of Atlanto-Med appearence, phenotypically. Afterly, around 500 B.C. , Celtic -Gaulish tribes, from Central Europe, invaded the area, whom became "Cisalpine Gallia". Celts fusioned themselves with pre-celtic populations, modifing the phenotype in a Central european sense. Gauls-Celts substantially brought in the area, types like Alpine, Borreby, Brunn, Atlantid, and Keltic nordic. My grandfather ("classify the captain" thread:D), could be a good example of an Atlantid type from north-west Italy (or better, Western-Padania).

In the centuries after, Roman empire invaded the area, but they didn't alterate the composition of the area, substantially. After the fall of roman empire, Germanic Longbards invaded north-east, and after, Franks invaded northwest Germanic pop. brought in the country Keltic-Nordic, Nordic, Dinaric types, less or more.

In few words, Germanic influence (a minority of course, in general terms) is stronger in north-east, while Celtic, is stronger in north-west : besides we must note a notable residual of pre-celtic phenotypical element (a bit like the ,relatively, "dark" complexioned people from British Isles) (atlanto-Med component). Indeed, on the Ligurian coast, there is a notable Atlanto-Med or Litorid component, while toward a more internal zone (Piedmont) U.P. types, -Alpine, Keltic-Nordic elements dominate the composition.

The boundary between the Italians and northern Italy is the Po Valley, which was occupied by the Celts and Teutons. Some parts of Padania arent really northern Italian regions.

Aistulf
Friday, June 17th, 2005, 11:57 AM
The boundary between the Italians and northern Italy is the Po Valley, which was occupied by the Celts and Teutons.
It was actually occupied mostly by Germanics, hardly - almost not - by Celts. The Germanics, or Teutons, more or less forced out a lot of Celts (like they did everywhere they came). It is a fact, though, that Celts have been longer in the Po-valley region than Germanics. A lot of Celtic influences that are still present in Northern Italy have remained from pre-Romance and pre-Germanic times.



Some parts of Padania arent really northern Italian regions.
Of course they aren't, they are Padanian, not "Italian" :P

Theobald
Friday, June 17th, 2005, 03:54 PM
Interesting posts, Celtic Tiger and Kening Redbad. :tthumbsup


The Germanics, or Teutons, more or less forced out a lot of Celts (like they did everywhere they came).
No, not here in Gaul. :D
Also, another question, after Charlemagne's conquest of Padania in 774, did some Franks settle in these regions ?

Theobald
Friday, June 17th, 2005, 04:04 PM
Those populations were of Atlanto-Med appearence, phenotypically.

besides we must note a notable residual of pre-celtic phenotypical element [...] Indeed, on the Ligurian coast, there is a notable Atlanto-Med or Litorid component
Huh, so Atlanto-Meds are of pre-Celtic descent ? I ask this because Alsatian people are, according to the "experts" ( ;) ), mostly Atlanto-Med and North-Atlantoid, with a strong Nordid element and some minor Alpinid and Dinarid influence.

Todesritter
Friday, June 17th, 2005, 05:35 PM
This is similar to the earliest racial disposition of the British Isles. Looking at the dates for things such as the creation of Stonehenge, these were constructed before the Celts had reached ancient Britain, and before the Indo-Aryan language speakers including the Celts had completed the replacement of ancient native western European ethnicities.

Most of what I have read suggests these aboriginal Europeans in this area were Atlanto-Med, Paleo-Atlantid, & North-Atlantid. Celtic migration, Roman occupation, and Germanic conquest, and the various phenotypes they brought with them are relative new comers to western Europe.

Huzar
Saturday, June 18th, 2005, 07:45 AM
The boundary between the Italians and northern Italy is the Po Valley, which was occupied by the Celts and Teutons. Some parts of Padania arent really northern Italian regions.
It depends by what you mean with Padania in geographical sense. Many consider Toscana and Umbria, part of northern Italy, for example, but i think the opposite, by the moment i consider these regions , part of central Italy, and not northern. Do you refer yourself to this ? Which parts of north Italy aren't really north ?

morfrain_encilgar
Saturday, June 18th, 2005, 02:16 PM
It depends by what you mean with Padania in geographical sense. Many consider Toscana and Umbria, part of northern Italy, for example, but i think the opposite, by the moment i consider these regions , part of central Italy, and not northern. Do you refer yourself to this ? Which parts of north Italy aren't really north ?

Thats what I meant. The border of Padania and central Italy should be around the Po river, and exclude both Tuscany and Umbria, and certain other regions of Italy thast have been included in Padania.

The "official" map of Padania Ive seen included these regions of Italy wihin Padania. Any Padania that includes these regions of Italy would be more artificial than one that doesnt include them.

Huzar
Sunday, June 19th, 2005, 05:43 PM
Thats what I meant. The border of Padania and central Italy should be around the Po river, and exclude both Tuscany and Umbria, and certain other regions of Italy thast have been included in Padania.

The "official" map of Padania Ive seen included these regions of Italy wihin Padania. Any Padania that includes these regions of Italy would be more artificial than one that doesnt include them.

Yeah, that's right. Probaly MARCHE, too. I'm very uncertain about Liguria, and its pre-celtic, Atlanto-Med population : many say that Liguria is part of Padania, while others not. Probably is in the middle.

Aistulf
Sunday, June 19th, 2005, 06:34 PM
Thats what I meant. The border of Padania and central Italy should be around the Po river, and exclude both Tuscany and Umbria, and certain other regions of Italy thast have been included in Padania.

The "official" map of Padania Ive seen included these regions of Italy wihin Padania. Any Padania that includes these regions of Italy would be more artificial than one that doesnt include them.
None of your concern anyway, as a Limey ;)

Northern Paladin
Sunday, June 19th, 2005, 08:45 PM
On the whole I would say they are more less Nordic than GB. But France is a big country and really it depends on the region. Southern France is almost all Med/Alpine. North Eastern France almost all Nordic/Keltic.

Is Latin here meant to be Med? I believe the Gauls too where significantly Med influenced.

Theobald
Sunday, June 19th, 2005, 08:47 PM
Yeah, that's right. Probaly MARCHE, too. I'm very uncertain about Liguria, and its pre-celtic, Atlanto-Med population : many say that Liguria is part of Padania, while others not. Probably is in the middle.
Why wouldn't Liguria be part of Padania ? :-O

I think Padania includes Liguria, Lombardia, Piemonte, Emilia Romagna, Veneto, Friuli Venezia Giulia and Trentino Alto Adige (Valle d'Aosta being French).

http://img92.exs.cx/img92/852/pad-industry.jpg

http://www.bandierquote=Berkanopopoli.com/images/padania/statiche/Padania.bmp

http://www.bandierquote=Berkanopopoli.com/padania.htm

Huzar
Monday, June 20th, 2005, 06:10 AM
On the whole I would say they are more less Nordic than GB. But France is a big country and really it depends on the region. Southern France is almost all Med/Alpine. North Eastern France almost all Nordic/Keltic.

Is Latin here meant to be Med? I believe the Gauls too where significantly Med influenced.

Uh, from what i 've heard, meds from british isles are called "Atlantids". Therefore i think that the med component of Gauls was Atlantid too

Huzar
Monday, June 20th, 2005, 06:14 AM
Why wouldn't Liguria be part of Padania ? :-O

I think Padania includes Liguria, Lombardia, Piemonte, Emilia Romagna, Veneto, Friuli Venezia Giulia and Trentino Alto Adige (Valle d'Aosta being French).

http://img92.exs.cx/img92/852/pad-industry.jpg

http://www.bandierquote=Berkanopopoli.com/images/padania/statiche/Padania.bmp

http://www.bandierquote=Berkanopopoli.com/padania.htm

O.K. , Liguria, will be included ;)


Valle D'Aosta part of french empire ?!?;) , Well i think that many inhabitants of the region would agree with the initiative..............

Aistulf
Monday, June 20th, 2005, 12:04 PM
Beautiful signature and avatar Celtic Tiger! :thumbup

Huzar
Monday, June 20th, 2005, 07:56 PM
Beautiful signature and avatar Celtic Tiger! :thumbup

Thank you for your support, Kening ! The flag in the avatar rapresents the "Vertamocor" tribe (piedmont celtic tribe). The seignature rapresents all the Padanian flags............

Theobald
Tuesday, June 21st, 2005, 12:48 AM
Valle D'Aosta part of french empire ?!?;) , Well i think that many inhabitants of the region would agree with the initiative..............
Hmm yes, I've always regarded them as Ethnic French and they spoke a French dialect before the Italian State decided to "italianize" them (still 70% of them understand and speak French nowadays). France could find an agreement with Italy or Padania to - for instance - buy this little region (like the Germans wanted to do in Kaliningrad/Konigsberg).
First Valle d'Aosta and then whole Padania in our Empire. :D :P

Huzar
Tuesday, June 21st, 2005, 06:23 AM
Hmm yes, I've always regarded them as Ethnic French and they spoke a French dialect before the Italian State decided to "italianize" them (still 70% of them understand and speak French nowadays). France could find an agreement with Italy or Padania to - for instance - buy this little region (like the Germans wanted to do in Kaliningrad/Konigsberg).
First Valle d'Aosta and then whole Padania in our Empire. :D :P
Ah, mon petit nationalist......:D;) France + Padania ? Hmm, would be a very extended nation . From Normandy to Venezia;). A vague Gaulic state less or more. Besides if we add to 55 millions of ethnic french about 20 millions of ethnic padanians, the result is 75 millions (the first ethnic presence in europe, at the same level of ethnic germans in Germany that is 75 millions).


Let me guess, southern England is one of the objectives of your blitzkrieg ?:D;):P

Theobald
Tuesday, June 21st, 2005, 10:18 AM
Let me guess, southern England is one of the objectives of your blitzkrieg ?:D;):P
Why only the South ? Whole England is a historical French land since 1066. :D :P


France + Padania ? Hmm, would be a very extended nation . From Normandy to Venezia;). A vague Gaulic state less or more. Besides if we add to 55 millions of ethnic french about 20 millions of ethnic padanians, the result is 75 millions (the first ethnic presence in europe, at the same level of ethnic germans in Germany that is 75 millions).

Sounds promising. Especially if we add 5 millions of hispanized Ethnic French (North of the Ebre river, former Spanish mark of Caroligian Empire), 5 millions of Ethnic French in Wallonia and French Switzerland, about 20 millions of Ethnic French in America (Quebec, USA, Argentina) and the Anglican French (45 millions or so)... :P ;)
French Empire Strikes Back. :D

Rhydderch
Tuesday, June 21st, 2005, 01:39 PM
Why only the South ? Whole England is a historical French land since 1066. :D :P Ah, well, England could take back Aquitaine and all those parts of France which were once controlled by the English king :D At one stage the king of England controlled more land in France than the French king ;)

Northern Paladin
Thursday, June 23rd, 2005, 03:23 PM
I think it's highlyh regional. Latin(med) dominates in the South. Teutonic in the North West. Keltic in the North East. And a general mix in the center.

Huzar
Thursday, June 23rd, 2005, 05:49 PM
I think it's highlyh regional. Latin(med) dominates in the South. Teutonic in the North West. Keltic in the North East. And a general mix in the center.

About the Med element, i think you generalize too much, N. Paladin. Yes, south France and Ligurian coast have a strong Med influence, but only if you mean the word mditerranean in the wider sense : indeed, the inhabitants of those zones, aren't mediterranean in the "classic" sense you probably imagine (short statured, dark pigmented, heavly gracialized etc.) southern france, pop. is mostly "Western-Med" (even called "Atlantid" in his more depigmented version) ; a type distinguishable by medium-tall height and slightly pigmented ( in the hair, the intermediate tones predominate, while the eyes are often hazel/green or grey/blue). Asociated to this type we must cite the "Atlanto-Med", tall statured and imponent with a dark or even intermediate pigmentation. In conclusion, surely not the "typical" Mediterranean you think, rather Atlantid, i'd say, often mixed with some alpinid strain. Letitia Casta would be a good example of central-southern french woman , i suppose. (Elsasser, please, correct me if i'm wrong............and post some pics of her if you can:D )

Southern Jarl
Thursday, June 23rd, 2005, 08:11 PM
Letitia Casta would be a good example of central-southern french woman , i suppose.
Laetitia Casta's pigmentation (her light skin, blue eyes and medium/light brown hair) strikes me as more Northern French than Southern.
But I've never been to France (not even Europe!), so I'm not sure...
Some info on her: her mother is Norman, and her father is Corsican, so she is an extreme Northern/Southern French blend. As for the pictures, I'll leave them to Elsasser...

Josep Conrad
Friday, June 24th, 2005, 08:38 AM
I think most of French comrades would agree with me that Isabelle Huppert would be that reppresentative pattern. Although Sophie Marceau would be quite a nice exaple of a fine French woman too. On men I would choose Pascal Greggory and Vincent Cassel, I´m not an expert, just opinions. Thanks.

Theobald
Friday, June 24th, 2005, 07:51 PM
About the Med element, i think you generalize too much, N. Paladin. Yes, south France and Ligurian coast have a strong Med influence, but only if you mean the word mditerranean in the wider sense : indeed, the inhabitants of those zones, aren't mediterranean in the "classic" sense you probably imagine (short statured, dark pigmented, heavly gracialized etc.) southern france, pop. is mostly "Western-Med" (even called "Atlantid" in his more depigmented version) ; a type distinguishable by medium-tall height and slightly pigmented ( in the hair, the intermediate tones predominate, while the eyes are often hazel/green or grey/blue). Asociated to this type we must cite the "Atlanto-Med", tall statured and imponent with a dark or even intermediate pigmentation. In conclusion, surely not the "typical" Mediterranean you think, rather Atlantid, i'd say, often mixed with some alpinid strain. (Elsasser, please, correct me if i'm wrong............)
Yes, you're right. I posted pics of people from Provence/French Riviera, Languedoc, Roussillon and Corsica (French Mediterranean areas) at Stirpes and it seems these areas were generally mostly Atlantid.

http://forum.stirpes.net/showpost.ph...3&postcount=58 (http://forum.stirpes.net/showpost.php?p=43203&postcount=58) (Corsica)
http://forum.stirpes.net/showpost.ph...9&postcount=59 (http://forum.stirpes.net/showpost.php?p=43209&postcount=59) (Provence/Riviera)
http://forum.stirpes.net/showpost.ph...6&postcount=65 (http://forum.stirpes.net/showpost.php?p=43226&postcount=65) (Languedoc/Roussillon)

Roussillon does show very strong Spanish influences though.


Laetitia Casta's pigmentation (her light skin, blue eyes and medium/light brown hair) strikes me as more Northern French than Southern.
Well, as far as I know she is only 1/4 Corsican (her father is half Corsican half Normandian, and her mother Normandian) so she is not really a good example of Southern French.
I would say Sébastien Grosjean (tennisman) is :

http://www.tennis.info/images/AussieOpen2004/08Tue/Grosjean1931.jpg

Or this guy (for Languedoc) :

http://storage.msn.com/s1pZ8pl_R1n1zGgNO47wTO7K8VKw7FFh8xDURysv Ok7KT0JpTuVJREgm6vMpu3DT8FMsVcah8uc2HZ0N WS_GmHvpg/00.jpg?MdToken=1759060269670830

You've also (Sub-)Nordic-looking people in these areas, such as Emmanuelle Béart.
I can post more pics in another thread if some people are interested in Southern French anthropology. ;)

Theobald
Friday, June 24th, 2005, 07:59 PM
I think most of French comrades would agree with me that Isabelle Huppert would be that reppresentative pattern. Although Sophie Marceau would be quite a nice exaple of a fine French woman too. On men I would choose Pascal Greggory and Vincent Cassel, I´m not an expert, just opinions. Thanks.
Are you talking about France as a whole or Southern France ?
I agree for Sophie Marceau and Isabelle Huppert, and Pascal Grégory to some extent. But I don't think Cassel is a good example of French man though, he looks rather "exotic" here in my opinion.

Southern Jarl
Sunday, June 26th, 2005, 02:10 AM
Well, as far as I know she is only 1/4 Corsican (her father is half Corsican half Normandian, and her mother Normandian) so she is not really a good example of Southern French.

I thought she should be more "mediterranean", given that I (wrongly) believed she was half Corsican. Thanks Elsasser, this clears things up.

Witukind
Saturday, September 17th, 2005, 06:41 PM
This idea of "French being mostly gauls" is a national myth that tries to legitimize ethnically the existence of this country. The French language has almost no words coming from Celtic but on the contrary there are a lot of words that come from Germanic. I do not mean to say that there aren't any Gauls at all, but they concentrate in the west. The east / north east is predominantly of Germanic heritage.

Penn ar bed
Monday, April 10th, 2006, 05:21 PM
The French language has almost no words coming from CelticThere are plenty of french words coming from gallic language. I believe the use of latin has been spread by catholic faith.

Concerning the poll, probably more than 60% of the french population is of celtic origin (gallic and breton). Concerning the other groups, it's difficult to see which of them dominates, and they've all heavily mixed with the celts. Germanics and 'latins' seem to be equally represented. ('Latins' include, I suppose, all med peoples like romans, ligurs, greeks, basques or ibers...)

Veritas Æquitas
Sunday, June 25th, 2006, 09:16 PM
There are plenty of french words coming from gallic language. I believe the use of latin has been spread by catholic faith.

Concerning the poll, probably more than 60% of the french population is of celtic origin (gallic and breton). Concerning the other groups, it's difficult to see which of them dominates, and they've all heavily mixed with the celts. Germanics and 'latins' seem to be equally represented. ('Latins' include, I suppose, all med peoples like romans, ligurs, greeks, basques or ibers...)

There are French words that come from Gallic, but Latin came to Gaul much earlier than the Church did when Julius Caesar conquered it, and the settling Roman people moved in and the Gauls and Romans intermixed. Voila.

Weg
Sunday, June 25th, 2006, 10:11 PM
There are French words that come from Gallic, but Latin came to Gaul much earlier than the Church did when Julius Caesar conquered it, and the settling Roman people moved in and the Gauls and Romans intermixed. Voila.

Not so sure that there were that many Romans settlers.

Huzar
Monday, June 26th, 2006, 01:15 AM
Not so sure that there were that many Romans settlers.


Same here. It's not easy to tell the exact number of Roman settlers in Europe. Probably much less than many think. Roman style of conquest was mostly cultural, not racial.

Weg
Monday, June 26th, 2006, 02:38 AM
Same here. It's not easy to tell the exact number of Roman settlers in Europe. Probably much less than many think. Roman style of conquest was mostly cultural, not racial.

Yes, I believe so. It's possible to rule a foreign territory with a minimum of manpower and a good organisation, what Romans definitely were able to do.

Rhydderch
Monday, June 26th, 2006, 01:14 PM
Yes, Romans sometimes settled in provincial cities, and sometimes populations were transplanted from one part of the Empire to another, but basically the Roman presence was just the army and the governors, and even the army probably would only have been made up of outsiders for the first 25 years or so after the conquest of a given region.

So the Roman Empire itself probably had little influence on the later phenotypes of the regions they conquered; their genetic influence was most likely absorbed within a few hundred years at most.