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schwab
Sunday, September 8th, 2019, 04:54 AM
I have been waiting for that for a long time, hopefully other prosperity teachers will follow. Benny Hinn RENOUNCES prosperity gospel, vows to never again ask for money (https://therightscoop.com/benny-hinn-renounces-prosperity-gospel-vows-to-never-again-ask-for-money/) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4TQQirZI9Eo

Elizabeth
Sunday, September 8th, 2019, 05:11 AM
I never liked Benny Hinn. I always thought he was a faker, a con man, a fraud.

Alice
Sunday, September 8th, 2019, 07:49 AM
Prosperity theology is bankrupt and totally false. Some people can be poor because they've made imprudent financial decisions, but others are poor because of circumstances beyond their control (illness, economic downturns, etc). Throughout the Bible, it's evident that God has a special concern for the poor, and believers have an obligation to help the poor. Christ himself certainly wasn't among the wealthy during his earthly ministry, and he constantly admonished "the rich".


Hopefully, Joel Osteen and Bruce Wilkinson (among others) will renounce the "health and wealth gospel", too. Maybe Hinn will revert to the faith of his childhood, who knows...

Terminus
Sunday, September 8th, 2019, 09:22 AM
Prosperity theology is bankrupt and totally false. Some people can be poor because they've made imprudent financial decisions, but others are poor because of circumstances beyond their control (illness, economic downturns, etc).Your Catholic training enables you to perceive it's lack of understanding for people's condition. Too bad most Protestants don't see it this way.


Throughout the Bible, it's evident that God has a special concern for the poor, and believers have an obligation to help the poor. Christ himself certainly wasn't among the wealthy during his earthly ministry, and he constantly admonished "the rich".The apostasy is found in all Christian sects, prosperity teaching is merely a purer iteration. And the apostasy is this: Christians evaluate practical success in an undertaking as a virtue in itself, as a mark of god's blessing. Never mind about the motives and aims, which are often egotistic.

If I squander a whole year trying to beat a video game with the utmost perfection/completion, is that not a silly use of the time I've been given? Not to mention the revulsion that stirs up within me whenever someone disrupts my concentration while I'm playing. And when I post my achievement on websites for all to see, am I not merely seeking validation of my perceived merit from superficial gaugers and mediocrities who will praise it then forget about it within a week? So it's not really about the success of the undertaking, but the merit of such an undertaking. If it's a futile one, then that is not praiseworthy.


There are two Christs in the gospels: the matchless teacher of humanity and a communist agitator. They were not originally one and the same. All the passages pertaining to rich/poor differences should be held in suspect.

When interpreted this way, his Sermon on the Mount (Luke 6:22-23, 26) is addressed to men who were of comparable caliber, not the average man. People under the sway of mass-movements (or more properly, psychosis) carry an instinctive antipathy towards great men, but are inclined towards bad intellectuals and leaders. Their instinct might not be blunted like the intellectual, but it's certainly undiscerning. This holds true for even nationalistic sects.


Matthew 26:11 The poor you will always have with you, but you will not always have me.

The cruel Calvinist takes this to mean there must always be poor and rich in every society, that's fate. What it actually means, imo, is that wherever there are poor people found in society, which is impoverished by prostitution, alcoholism, drug addiction, crime, etc., that city is devoid of Christ's presence/spirit/teaching. It does not have the slightest trace of culture remaining.

Matthew 18:20 For where two or three gather in my name, there am I with them.


I think there's a 50% chance Jesus could have been born into a wealthy family (which would have afforded him greater access to world literature for his ministry, as was the case with Aristotle's), although it's true that scarcely any great men comes from the wealthy classes.

schwab
Sunday, September 8th, 2019, 05:59 PM
".....Christ himself certainly wasn't among the wealthy during his earthly ministry, and he constantly admonished "the rich"....."

If Christ would have been wealthy, He would have been traveling in a gold plated Roman chariot.
There is no evidence in the Scriptures that Christ even owned a home.

Astragoth
Sunday, September 8th, 2019, 08:16 PM
Prosperity theology is bankrupt and totally false. Some people can be poor because they've made imprudent financial decisions, but others are poor because of circumstances beyond their control (illness, economic downturns, etc). Throughout the Bible, it's evident that God has a special concern for the poor, and believers have an obligation to help the poor. Christ himself certainly wasn't among the wealthy during his earthly ministry, and he constantly admonished "the rich".


Hopefully, Joel Osteen and Bruce Wilkinson (among others) will renounce the "health and wealth gospel", too. Maybe Hinn will revert to the faith of his childhood, who knows...

Prosperity doctrine is an abomination. Wealth wasn't even seen as much of a benefit but more of a hinderance. Just look at the way most people behave when they have it.

Terminus
Monday, September 9th, 2019, 05:52 AM
".....Christ himself certainly wasn't among the wealthy during his earthly ministry, and he constantly admonished "the rich"....."

If Christ would have been wealthy, He would have been traveling in a gold plated Roman chariot.
There is no evidence in the Scriptures that Christ even owned a home.When it said the Son of Man had no place to lay his head, that wasn't intended to be taken literally. If foxes represent the lower (masses) and birds represent the higher (intellectuals), coincidentally both are predator species (opportunists), then the Son of Man refers to great men (especially humanists) being rejected from human society. It's also implied that great men only act aggressively from necessity.

Luke 12:24 Consider the ravens: They do not sow or reap, they have no storeroom or barn; yet God feeds them. And how much more valuable you are than birds!

Consider who this was addressed to. A great man is worth more than a thousand opportunists.