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View Full Version : Atheist Scientists Are in Minority, Survey Suggests



Chlodovech
Monday, July 15th, 2019, 12:17 AM
ChurchTimes (https://www.churchtimes.co.uk/articles/2017/22-september/news/uk/atheist-scientists-are-in-minority-survey-suggests?fbclid=IwAR2w4GqfIOJgQ8nfdvTuVO 8ruyNk1jGazIbH8wIzfGEcgKTdgvlREGRyVdg)

https://www.churchtimes.co.uk/media/5635916/istock-542576580.jpg?center=0.2880658436213992, 0.54269972451790638&mode=crop&width=818&height=500&rnd=131504766270000000

A NEW survey suggests that among scientific and technical professionals in the UK, Germany, and France, atheists are in a minority.

It found that, among the British respondents, almost half categorised themselves as between spiritual and religious, while 21 per cent said that they were agnostic and 25 per cent said they were atheist.

The survey of 3000 science, medical, technical, and engineering leaders was conducted by the pollsters Ipsos MORI for the Scientific and Medical Network: an international organisation pledged to conduct evidence-based enquiry into themes bridging science, spirituality, and consciousness.

Roughly one in three of the UK participants, and a quarter of those in France and Germany agreed that religion or spirituality was important to the way in which they live their lives. In all three countries, people with higher educational qualifications were more spiritual or religious than those with lower qualifications.

Most of the respondents felt that religion and science were independent realms that could be compared: 44 per cent in the UK, 52 per cent in France, and 47 per cent in Germany. A quarter in the UK, however, and 21 per cent in France and Germany, said that they contradicted each other. In the UK and Germany, 21 per cent saw them as complementary; and, in France, 16 per cent. In the UK, 15 per cent of atheists meditated regularly.

Professor Eric Priest, a mathematician and a former President of the Royal Astronomical Society, said that the survey reinforced previous research which showed that most scientists “reject the outdated claim by New Atheists of a conflict between science and spirituality”. He suggested that, instead, many scientists had “a more subtle, nuanced view of the relationship, and recognise that questioning, imagination, creativity, reason, faith, and community are common features of both science and religion”.

The Revd Keith Ward, a former Regius Professor of Divinity in Oxford and an expert on the relationship between science and religion, said: “This is a well-constructed survey which throws doubt on the assertion that scientists mostly find that their work is incompatible with religious belief.

“The facts are much more complex, and it is good to have evidence that this is so.”

SaxonPagan
Monday, July 15th, 2019, 12:02 PM
The Church Times is hardly an impartial source ;)

It all depends where you place the emphasis and another article might title with: "Religious scientists are in minority, survey suggests", which would be equally true.

Still, I see no reason why engineers and mathematicians cannot have a spiritual side.

Astragoth
Monday, July 15th, 2019, 12:05 PM
No one else but the Church Times would even publish the survey.

Wolgadeutscher
Monday, July 15th, 2019, 01:13 PM
Atheists don't like to admit two main facts:

First, atheism is itself a religion. So is scientism for that matter (evolutionism, for starters).

Second, secular sources are far less impartial. Just like they present certain theories (such as the theory of evolution) to be facts, they also like to paint this picture where the "civilised" world is free from the "shackles" of Christianity. The truth is they live in their own bubble, and aren't interested in critical thought, nor rationality. Even if God were to show himself and prove them wrong, they would still turn their backs and deny it. Considering that kind of attitude of living in their own bubble, the credence of atheist sources is flimsy, at best.

SaxonPagan
Monday, July 15th, 2019, 05:18 PM
The truth is they live in their own bubble, and aren't interested in critical thought, nor rationality. Even if God were to show himself and prove them wrong, they would still turn their backs and deny it. Considering that kind of attitude of living in their own bubble, the credence of atheist sources is flimsy, at best.

I really don’t think this is true, Wolga. If we’re talking critical thought and rationality then secular individuals possess far more of these qualities than religious ones.

How rational is it to blindly accept that someone created the world inside 6 days before sending his son (born to a virgin) to perform miracles such as turning water into wine, healing the blind, making trees wither by cursing them, walking on water and then, as his piece de resistance, returning from the dead? To any rational person these things are ridiculous but Christians accept them all unquestioningly, simply because they’re written in a book and critical thinking is almost non-existent on their part.

Are you seriously claiming that non-believers would deny irrefutable evidence of God even if it were presented to them? I doubt this very much, even among the most stubborn of them, but it’s purely hypothetical because no such proof will ever materialise. We both know this, but all Christians have to do is keep professing their ‘faith’ (which is the antithesis of logic and reason) and as far as they're concerned this overrides all valid arguments.

Personally, I think it’s Christians who are living in some kind of bubble but there are millions of other members trapped inside, just like them, and as long as they keep saying things that other Christians want to hear (including hostile comments towards those on the outside) their social club will continue to function. I have no problem with this – we all need a sense of belonging but I’d rather join the Lord of the Rings fan club because I find the stories more interesting and the membership (who at least realise it’s pure fiction) are far less delusional.

Meister
Monday, July 15th, 2019, 06:10 PM
I'd like to know the races of the scientists polled. I think we can all agree that in the Non Western world people are still very much believers to varying degrees of their religions. So if you asked scientists who were non white you would get more religious ones than white ones I would guess.

Meister
Monday, July 15th, 2019, 06:14 PM
Atheists don't like to admit two main facts:

First, atheism is itself a religion. So is scientism for that matter (evolutionism, for starters).



I agree 100%. One of the things you read a lot on forums from atheists is "There isn't any proof of God" ok, but there isn't any proof that there isn't either. The other thing they like to write is "Provide proof" but again, they can't provide proof there isn't one either.

In the end it comes down to faith whether it is faith in a God or faith that there isn't one.

SaxonPagan
Monday, July 15th, 2019, 06:18 PM
Fair enough, but there's also something known as the burden of proof ;)

Meister
Monday, July 15th, 2019, 06:40 PM
Fair enough, but there's also something known as the burden of proof ;)

Which I have noticed never seems to apply to Atheists...

SaxonPagan
Monday, July 15th, 2019, 06:54 PM
They are not the ones making the claims.

You cannot say: "miracles/angels/Heaven etc.. exist unless someone can prove that they do not."

The burden of proof always lies with the person making the claim.

Þoreiðar
Monday, July 15th, 2019, 06:58 PM
First, atheism is itself a religion.How so?

Chlodovech
Tuesday, July 16th, 2019, 12:08 AM
“Reason is no substitute for faith, just as color is no substitute for sound.” - Nicolás Gómez Dávila

“That is what religion promises: not a purpose, necessarily, but something that removes the paradox of an entirely law-governed world, open to consciousness, that is nevertheless without an explanation: that just is, for no reason at all. The evangelical atheists are subliminally aware that their abdication in the face of science does not make the universe more intelligible, nor does it provide an alternative answer to our metaphysical enquiries. It simply brings enquiry to a stop. And the religious person will feel that this stop is premature: that reason has more questions to ask, and perhaps more answers to obtain, than the atheists will allow us. So who, in this subliminal contest, is the truly reasonable one? The atheists beg the question in their own favour, by assuming that science has all the answers. But science can have all the answers only if it has all the questions; and that assumption is false. There are questions addressed to reason which are not addressed to science, since they are not asking for a causal explanation.” - Roger Scruton

I never considered the answers science has given us or can give us as relevant to any of life's major questions nor as a justification of atheism in itself. I don't think invoking science as a jack-in-the-box or that science's answers must lead one automatically to atheism.

Technically speaking atheism means the absence of religion given a lack of belief in the divine, hence it's not religion - but humans can make a religion out of everything - and atheists play their part in identity/group politics. As such some atheists may very well become indistinguishable from religious people, no less dogmatic.