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Nachtengel
Saturday, February 16th, 2019, 07:27 PM
Do you know that scientists are almost ready to bring back some species that have been long gone? A T-Rex and other dangerous creatures aren't on the VIP list, so we won't see them in the not-so-distant future. But some of our most beloved characters from the Ice Age movies can be brought back to life!

Instead of using the controversial term “cloning,” scientists prefer to say “make un-extinct.” To-may-to, to-mah-to, the idea is the same. An animal that died out thousands of years ago can't be brought back to life unless it's cloned. And therein lies the problem. For successful cloning, scientists need to have almost completely undamaged animal DNA. That's why some species are more likely to be resurrected than others.
Those animals that died out not so long ago are better candidates for un-extinction. They might still be preserved in museums or in permafrost that formed during the most recent ice age.

TIMESTAMPS:
The woolly mammoth 2:01
The saber-toothed tiger 3:00
The Moa 3:48
The ground sloth 4:27
The dodo 5:19
Woolly rhinoceros 6:12
The Irish elk 6:44
The Baiji river dolphin 7:26
The Siberian unicorn 8:05
The Neanderthal 8:55

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cHZ5mJK4J5Q

Víðálfr
Saturday, February 16th, 2019, 08:44 PM
I agree that's UNETHICAL. And it's also against Nature.

If either Nature or human activity made them extinct... this is how it is supposed to be... And with human activity making them extinct, it means they couldn't adapt... natural selection, that's it...

If they are going to do this... what would the next step be?

Cloning human beings?

They already have the DNA samples of so many people (DNA testing anyone?)... would be easy to clone people too...

There are enough crazy people who wouldn't mind having a cloned version of their loved ones... in case of unrequited love... or if their loved one died or whatever may have happened...

This trend can go crazy like that...

I don't agree humans can do whatever they want using science, especially such things like cloning or making such experiments... That's against Nature... unethical... or as Christians would say, that's against God's will (if God wanted them to disappear, then let it be like that...)... Anyway, as a Heathen I just say that's against Nature and against Universal Law... We should not interfere with such things...

Finnish Swede
Saturday, February 16th, 2019, 09:24 PM
I'm not very religious person, so I don't base my opinion on that (humans playing to be a God).

But I don't like the idea as
1.) those new animals would not be totally same as their ancient models. They would be something new. Do we need those? Nope.
2.) humans should create lots of numbers ... so that these new animals could reproduce normal ways. I doubt there are enough genes available for that.

Nope. It would make much more sense to try to safe/fight behalf of all our present wild animals.

Víðálfr
Saturday, February 16th, 2019, 09:40 PM
It would make much more sense to try to safe/fight behalf of all our present wild animals.
Good point! :thumbup

Hawx
Saturday, February 16th, 2019, 09:59 PM
The extinct animals are being resurrected using copy rite processes and will be owned as some corporations intellectual property, thus protected under the law along with their offspring! MORE PROTECTED THAN HUMANS!

GroeneWolf
Sunday, February 17th, 2019, 02:28 AM
How cool the idea might be from a scientific point of view in order to learn more about these species and in specific their behaviour. There are also other problems. Lets say for example if a couple of those animals escape, or be set free by ALF-activists, and the effect it would have the ecosystems they then settle in. And most of these species, except for maybe the dodo, have been extinct for so long that it probably safe to say it is not a reintroduction of a specie that would help balance a disrupted ecosystem (like for example wolves slowly coming back in Western Europe).

Now we also the issue that the Neanderthal might be conscious. Which opens up a whole other can of worms in relation to what their rights and duties would be.

Finnish Swede
Sunday, February 17th, 2019, 10:52 AM
How cool the idea might be from a scientific point of view in order to learn more about these species and in specific their behaviour. There are also other problems. Lets say for example if a couple of those animals escape, or be set free by ALF-activists, and the effect it would have the ecosystems they then settle in. And most of these species, except for maybe the dodo, have been extinct for so long that it probably safe to say it is not a reintroduction of a specie that would help balance a disrupted ecosystem (like for example wolves slowly coming back in Western Europe).

Now we also the issue that the Neanderthal might be conscious. Which opens up a whole other can of worms in relation to what their rights and duties would be.

Right...ecosystems have changed a lot since days of those animals. They could not be returned to wild life (they would just live in zoos etc.). What kind of life that would be? And it is not only ecosystems (predator vs prey relationships) ... but whole nature has changed a lot....thank's to humans. I bet humans interests (how to use forests/nature) vs Mammoths or woolly rhinoceros would not fit together.
https://d3egew7zjohdb1.cloudfront.net/ponIltIpIv-1432152171/incoming/wx5k4b-800px-Wooly_rhinoceros/alternates/FREE_400/800px-Wooly_rhinoceros

Opposite ... for example there are only 5 rhinos (spices) left ....and 4 of 5 are today endangered species. Most critical one is Northern white rhinoceros...which only have 2 females alive. The 4. (female) died 2015 (some of hers egg cells were succeed to save), but last male died March 2018. It was old 45 years, and faced lots of sickness and pains.
If anything ... humans should try to save that kind of spices and not try to make some kind of unique show animals .... as those animals could still be returned to wild life.
https://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-43468066