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Timo
Thursday, August 5th, 2004, 12:27 PM
My name is Timo. I pretty much thought that my name was short form of Timoteo/Timotheus from the Bible, but now I know different. I came to know that Timotheus meant, honourer of god (or something similiar). This was wierd to me, because I have been a Germanic Heathen for years. I read a certain article, Wie soll unser Kind heißen? (http://www.asatru.de/namen.htm) (What should our child be named?), and I was dead set on giving my offspring germanic names, even if mine hadn't been.
Untill, to my surprise, I came along a site of origin of german names, and found my amoungst them.
It said Timo was a variant of Dietmar. Apparently the evolution is: Dietmar -> Thietmar -> Thiemo -> Thimo -> Timo.
http://www.kunigunde.ch/HMD.htm#gnDietmar
I guess Dietmar, and likewise Timo, means "known of the people."

What is the meaning of your name, and what is the origin?

Zyklop
Thursday, August 5th, 2004, 12:35 PM
Biblical name here so I won´t share it :D
But my father´s name is Alfred which means "he who advises with elfish help".

Timo
Thursday, August 5th, 2004, 12:43 PM
I always love the name Alfred. I hate that the jewish hollywood and comic-book culture made Alfred to be a name of a Butler.

Milesian
Thursday, August 5th, 2004, 01:39 PM
My Christian name is Aramaic :D
My surname is Gaelic and means " Descendent of the Little Warrior" ;)

Frans_Jozef
Thursday, August 5th, 2004, 02:54 PM
My double Christian name is well-known on Skadi as my username; contrary to what some lowlife badmouth behind my back on some other forums, it's no imposture.

My family is very common throughout Belgium, even south of the language border, and also reasonable spread across the southern provinces of the Netherlands.
It's a patronyme which underwent a declension with -s; my NP nickname is the root name and means "friend of the Goths".

Milesian
Thursday, August 5th, 2004, 03:26 PM
My double Christian name is well-known on Skadi as my username; contrary to what some lowlife badmouth behind my back on some other forums, it's no imposture.



The Austro-Hungarian Emperor who shares your double Christian name was a great man also and I considered him for my top three :cool:

Allenson
Thursday, August 5th, 2004, 03:52 PM
Biblical name here so I won´t share it :D
But my father´s name is Alfred which means "he who advises with elfish help".


Yes, I have a Classical/Biblical first name as well. Here is what this (http://www.behindthename.com/) site has to say about the name 'Peter':



PETER m
Usage: English, German, Scandinavian, Slovene, Biblical
Pronounced: PEE-tur
Derived from Greek petros meaning "stone". In the New Testament Jesus gave the apostle Simon the name Cephas (meaning "stone" in Aramaic) which was translated Peter in many versions of the Bible (compare Matthew 16:18 and John 1:42). Simon Peter was the most prominent of the apostles during Jesus's ministry and he is considered by some to be the first pope. This name was also borne by Peter the Great, the czar of Russia who defeated Sweden in the Great Northern War in the 18th century.


My surname is one of undetermined and perhaps multiple origins. My direct pateral line, thus the carrier of the surname hails from Fowlis Wester in the lowlands of Perthshire Scotland. They could have been Gaels or maybe Saxons...

Here is what this (http://www.last-names.net/surname.asp?surname=Alan;Allan) site says about it:

Search results for: Alan;allan
Derived, according to Julius Scaliger, from the Sclavonic Aland, a wolf-dog, a hound, and Chaucer uses Aland in the same sense. Bailey derives it as the same from the British. Camden thinks it a corruption of Ælianus, which signifies sun-bright. From the same we have Allen, Allin, Alleyne. In the Gaelic, Aluinn signifies exceedingly fair, handsome, elegant, lovely; Irish, Alun, fair, beautiful.

Milesian
Thursday, August 5th, 2004, 03:58 PM
Yes, I have a Classical/Biblical first name as well. Here is what this (http://www.behindthename.com/) site has to say about the name 'Peter':



PETER m
Usage: English, German, Scandinavian, Slovene, Biblical
Pronounced: PEE-tur
Derived from Greek petros meaning "stone". In the New Testament Jesus gave the apostle Simon the name Cephas (meaning "stone" in Aramaic) which was translated Peter in many versions of the Bible (compare Matthew 16:18 and John 1:42). Simon Peter was the most prominent of the apostles during Jesus's ministry and he is considered by some to be the first pope. This name was also borne by Peter the Great, the czar of Russia who defeated Sweden in the Great Northern War in the 18th century.


My surname is one of undetermined and perhaps multiple origins. My direct pateral line, thus the carrier of the surname hails from Fowlis Wester in the lowlands of Perthshire Scotland. They could have been Gaels or maybe Saxons...

Here is what this (http://www.last-names.net/surname.asp?surname=Alan;Allan) site says about it:

Search results for: Alan;allan
Derived, according to Julius Scaliger, from the Sclavonic Aland, a wolf-dog, a hound, and Chaucer uses Aland in the same sense. Bailey derives it as the same from the British. Camden thinks it a corruption of Ælianus, which signifies sun-bright. From the same we have Allen, Allin, Alleyne. In the Gaelic, Aluinn signifies exceedingly fair, handsome, elegant, lovely; Irish, Alun, fair, beautiful.


Both top-notch names :cool:

Allan / Alan is a common name in Scotland and to a lesser extent in Ireland.
Perthshire (as I'm sure you know) is the gateway to the Scottish Highlands. Saxons generally did not settle so far north. The Angles, penetrated as far as Lothian but noweher as far as Perthshire.
The region would have been Pictish until eventually incorporated into the united Pictish/Scottish kingdom.
If that name has been given to successive generations then I would say it likely is from the Gaelic.
If your parents just chose it because they liked it, then it could be from anything you want ;)

Allenson
Thursday, August 5th, 2004, 04:14 PM
Both top-notch names :cool:

Allan / Alan is a common name in Scotland and to a lesser extent in Ireland.
Perthshire (as I'm sure you know) is the gateway to the Scottish Highlands. Saxons generally did not settle so far north. The Angles, penetrated as far as Lothian but noweher as far as Perthshire.
The region would have been Pictish until eventually incorporated into the united Pictish/Scottish kingdom.
If that name has been given to successive generations then I would say it likely is from the Gaelic.
If your parents just chose it because they liked it, then it could be from anything you want ;)


Thanks lad! :)

Yes, it is a paternal surname and it doesn't seem to have undergone any changes since my Scottish immigrant ggggggg-grandfather came here to America in the late 1760s. However, he (David) came over with his brother (William) and I've seen his brother refered to in records as William Ellen as opposed to Allen...

Milesian
Thursday, August 5th, 2004, 04:48 PM
Thanks lad! :)

Yes, it is a paternal surname and it doesn't seem to have undergone any changes since my Scottish immigrant ggggggg-grandfather came here to America in the late 1760s. However, he (David) came over with his brother (William) and I've seen his brother refered to in records as William Ellen as opposed to Allen...

Interesting. I wonder if it really was Ellen?
Not a name I'm familiar with (at least for a male ;)), but not impossible I guess.

My own hunch is that immigrants names were often incorrectly registered with regards to spelling,etc.
It happened in the 19th century with Irish immigrants to Scotland.
Many of them were illiterate (education having been denied to many of them due to remenants of the Penal Laws) and with the accents, their names often underwent variations, so that may be another possibility in William's case

cosmocreator
Thursday, August 5th, 2004, 06:29 PM
GERARD m
Usage: English, Dutch
Pronounced: je-RAHRD
Derived from the Germanic element ger "spear" combined with hard "brave, hardy". The Normans introduced this name to Britain.

Dr. Brandt
Thursday, August 5th, 2004, 08:55 PM
Heinrich = Rich on Land

.... which is unfortunatly not true in my case :p

Prussian_Mystic
Thursday, August 5th, 2004, 08:59 PM
my name is Linden,I was named after the tree

Northern Paladin
Thursday, August 5th, 2004, 10:27 PM
SPENCER: Middle English for "provider." This is a name with integrity and sincerity. Relatives: Spenser, Spence. Namesakes: Spencer Tracy, Spencer Christian, Edmund Spenser, "Spenser for Hire"

kinvolk
Thursday, August 5th, 2004, 10:44 PM
I have a biblical name with a unique spelling. Some of the Volk here know it but please dont share it because I like my sense of anonimity. Yes, I am 'THAT' kinvolk. As far as the other volks names they have shared; Not a stinker in the bunch! :viking1:

Ewergrin
Friday, August 6th, 2004, 01:57 AM
My full name literally translates to "the white footsoldier."

+Suomut+
Friday, August 6th, 2004, 07:31 AM
My Christian name is Aramaic...My first name is Christian & Hebrew, meaning "who is like God?" My friends onsite already know it...I'll let you others try to figure it out. lol ;) My middle name is Greek, the specifics of which I'll withhold. I have two surnames (since I'm adopted) the first of which is biological/natural and the second of which is adopted: the first (biological), is Alemannic (Swiss-German/Schwyzerdütsch) and relates to a farming occupation; the second (adopted), is Anglo-Saxon and relates to a military occupation. Again, I'll withhold both. ;)


Biblical name here so I won´t share it :D
But my father´s name is Alfred which means "he who advises with elfish help"."Alfred" is of course one of the most popular names afloat within esp. the English and Deutsch worlds; and your defining what the word means is 100% accurate. The Anglo-Saxon version was/is "Ælfræd" ["ælf", elf + "ræd" counsel], and the name first became popular among the English during and following the reign of the Saxon King Alfred "The Great," so among the English the name has been used as given names and surnames ever since 849 A.D. One French form of the name is "Aufrède"; and one Svensk form is "Alfredsson." I'd love to hear the history of the name among Deutschers if you would happen to know!? :)


...my NP nickname is the root name and means "friend of the Goths".Indeed, although the prefix 'gos-' is less than apparent, but possible, I'm sure. The '-win-' element also indeed means in the Teutonic tongues 'friend.' This element over the centuries have been very used very much by English folks, esp. in surnames...the Ang.-Sax. version was/is 'wine.'


...Allan / Alan is a common name in Scotland and to a lesser extent in Ireland.
Perthshire (as I'm sure you know) is the gateway to the Scottish Highlands. Saxons generally did not settle so far north. The Angles, penetrated as far as Lothian but noweher as far as Perthshire.
The region would have been Pictish until eventually incorporated into the united Pictish/Scottish kingdom.
If that name has been given to successive generations then I would say it likely is from the Gaelic....1.) yeah, it is common among Scots, but also among the English (it's impossible to tell which ethnicity has more folks with the surname), and as you say, seemingly the surname is not as present among the Irish...2.) yeah, you're right about Perthshire being 'less-than-English;' and is indeed classic Pict-country; one of my Scottish lines goes there and allegedly that line is Pictish (don't even THINK! about calling them 'swarthy meds.' or I'll kill ya' mate!!! LMAO LOL ;) )...3.) among the British Island ethnicities, I have to concur with you that the surname is in most cases probably of Gaelic origin (see attachment below); although perhaps a few English folks with the name got it from Teutonic sources, esp. since Plattdeutschers, Danes, and Swedes with the surname got it, apparently, thus (see attachment).

http://www.forums.skadi.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=435&stc=1


...Yes, it is a paternal surname and it doesn't seem to have undergone any changes since my Scottish immigrant ggggggg-grandfather came here to America in the late 1760s. However, he (David) came over with his brother (William) and I've seen his brother refered to in records as William Ellen as opposed to Allen...Your mentioning of 'Ellen' this may change everything about you being paternally Scots (unless the name is truly "Allen" in a corrupted spelling), though, since the same book that the above attachment comes from no where mentions it as being a Scottish surname, but does mention it as being exclusively an Eng. one which first rose in popularity in England during the Middle Ages (for religious reasons) and was borrowed from/rooted in the famous Greek name "Helen" (the etymology of which is rather obscure, although some think it to be akin to the the Greek "helane" meaning "torch."


Interesting. I wonder if it really was Ellen?
Not a name I'm familiar with (at least for a male ;)), but not impossible I guess. My own hunch is that immigrants names were often incorrectly registered with regards to spelling,etc.
It happened in the 19th century with Irish immigrants to Scotland.
Many of them were illiterate (education having been denied to many of them due to remenants of the Penal Laws) and with the accents, their names often underwent variations, so that may be another possibility in William's case1.) one reason you're probably not familiar with it is that it virtually a non-existent surname among Scottish ethnics (excluding those Scots who have English heritage) as I've mentioned above....2.) you're absolutely right about the the spelling corruptions of names/surnames esp. the further one goes back in time since the more one goes back, the more illiterate folks were (esp. the 'lower' classes) of all ethnicities, period....3.) Indeed, it's very possible Pete's name could have been corrupted from "Allen" to "Ellen"...none of us can solve that mystery here, though. lol ;) Oh, brother-Milesian, "Ellen" can and does exist as MORE! than just a given-name!! lol :p ;)

@ Dalonord: You could very well be paternally Scottish, Pete. Regardless of whether you're Scottish or English, paternally, you're still one handsome, ruddy, Norðid man! ;) :)

FYI, if your Allens/Allans are indeed of Scottish heritage...said family has strong 'clan' connections to both the MacDonalds of Clanranald as well as the MacFarlanes. So, if you're indeed Scots and you ever have any interest in joining any Scottish clan orgs., one or both of these clans could be options for you.


P.S.--I have known, been around, & been friends with all of my life members of the VAST! Allen family. Actually, the WORST! 'crush' I've ever had on a woman was a member of the family...as a matter of fact, she was/is one of the most BEAUTIFUL! Norðid women I've ever laid eyes on!:icon_surp :love:

Prussian
Friday, August 6th, 2004, 10:41 AM
This is an interesting thread, anyhow I am going to contribute to it.

My first name is Wesley which is an old english (anglo-saxon) name and means "man from the west", as for my middle name it is a typical german one meaning "God is gracious" but I won't mention it I will let you all figure it out and as for my surname it is a german surname and originates from the brandenburg-brandenburg area and it means "dragon like" in the Märkisch dialect. :)

Timo
Friday, August 6th, 2004, 12:53 PM
:viking1:
GERARD m
Usage: English, Dutch
Pronounced: je-RAHRD
Derived from the Germanic element ger "spear" combined with hard "brave, hardy". The Normans introduced this name to Britain.

Good name.

Allenson
Friday, August 6th, 2004, 03:00 PM
@ Dalonord: You could very well be paternally Scottish, Pete. Regardless of whether you're Scottish or English, paternally, you're still one handsome, ruddy, Norðid man! ;) :)

FYI, if your Allens/Allans are indeed of Scottish heritage...said family has strong 'clan' connections to both the MacDonalds of Clanranald as well as the MacFarlanes. So, if you're indeed Scots and you ever have any interest in joining any Scottish clan orgs., one or both of these clans could be options for you.


P.S.--I have known, been around, & been friends with all of my life members of the VAST! Allen family. Actually, the WORST! 'crush' I've ever had on a woman was a member of the family...as a matter of fact, she was/is one of the most BEAUTIFUL! Norðid women I've ever laid eyes on!:icon_surp :love:



Aye! We Allens are a handsome lot, LOL! :laugh:

I have traced this paternal line back to Fowlis Wester in Perthshire and I'm pretty confident that it is indeed so. However, one paternal line surely only tells a small fraction of the total familial story. I actually have very little Scot in my heritage beyond this line....

They were members of the Presbyterian Chruch in New Scotland, NY so that's a pretty good hint that they were in indeed Scots. ;)

+Suomut+
Friday, August 6th, 2004, 04:45 PM
Aye! ...I have traced this paternal line back to Fowlis Wester in Perthshire and I'm pretty confident that it is indeed so. However, one paternal line surely only tells a small fraction of the total familial story. I actually have very little Scot in my heritage beyond this line....

They were members of the Presbyterian Chruch in New Scotland, NY so that's a pretty good hint that they were in indeed Scots. ;)Well, man, with you divulging more info. and facts...there's very little doubt about it (esp. with the Perthshire ties and also VERY ESP. with the PRESBYTERIAN!!! part of your heritage via them!!!) they (and you) were surely Scotsmen/women, thus you are a paternal Scotsman IMHO. ;) :) But, you're absolutely right, the pater. line doesn't mean everything in one's genetic heritage; and of course, standing alone, it is the smallest part of us all, individually speaking. Same deal with me, I'm paternally Deutsch, but most of mine ancestors were English (mostly Ang.-Sax., but also substantially Norman). I'm a WEE! bit Scots myself, down both my dad's and mom's sides; but overall, I'm hardly Scots at all (a fact I'm not proud of since I love my Scottish heritage so very dearly) and the only other heritage that I have less than Scots is Welsh, which I am a TINY WEE! bit. LOL ;) :)

CHEERS P.!!!

GreenHeart
Monday, August 23rd, 2004, 10:15 AM
According to this site (http://www.kunigunde.ch/) my name means white, blond and smooth :D , but thats not why my mother picked it, she picked it because it was popular and sounded good at the time... :rolleyes:

AngryPotato
Wednesday, August 25th, 2004, 05:29 AM
Erik (Eric / Erich / Eirikr) a couple of meanings but the most popular that I've found is 'ever ruler.'

Erich, Erik, Rik (Der Ehrenreiche),
http://www.asatru.de/namen.htm
The krauts will be better to truly translate that. Honorer of Empire?

My father doesn't speak much about anything, but from what I can tell the man is quite avid about the Germanic peoples. I don't think his choice of a blond haired / blue eyed wife was a coincidence. The story of my naming as told by my mother is that my father would give me no name of a man that he hatred or at least disliked. He grew up in NYC so that would be a tough thing. She proposed the idea of Eric which he in turn switched to Erik. I was a huge baby and the name was quite fitting for the future king :D

My last name as far as I can tell is the corruption of a viking/norse name meaning "gregarious race."

Not too bad of a combo for first and lasts names. :viking4:

Willowsprout
Wednesday, August 25th, 2004, 09:55 AM
My name is Shannon (Irish/Gaelic)meaning:1. Shannon Wise one

where I got the info
http://www.thenamesite.com/cgi-bin/name_lookup.cgi?searchname=Shannon

Zyklop
Wednesday, August 25th, 2004, 03:02 PM
Erik (Eric / Erich / Eirikr) a couple of meanings but the most popular that I've found is 'ever ruler.'

Erich, Erik, Rik (Der Ehrenreiche),
http://www.asatru.de/namen.htm
The krauts will be better to truly translate that. Honorer of Empire?

No, it means "he who is rich of honor".

Triglav
Wednesday, August 25th, 2004, 09:24 PM
My name is Slavic and means "gift of the gods".

Shaun
Wednesday, August 25th, 2004, 11:15 PM
My last name is Andresen and means Son of Andrew.

Evolved
Thursday, August 26th, 2004, 10:09 AM
Sarah, which means "Princess" in Hebrew, and is the name of Abraham's wife. The earlier form was Sarai, meaning "contentious," but God changed it. I think I'm more contentious than I am a 'Hebrew Princess', though. :icon_wink

http://www.goodorient.com/chinesenames/S/SARAH.jpg
http://www.goodorient.com/chinesenames/

aprilness
Saturday, August 28th, 2004, 10:33 PM
My name is April. Nothing really mysterious about the name itself, but my mother named me after the month she met my father for the first time and fell in love.

They are divorced now, but it's still a sweet story. LOL

Rachel
Sunday, August 29th, 2004, 12:40 AM
My first name is Hebrew and apparently means 'sheep'.

In the Book of Genesis (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Book_of_Genesis), Rachel (רחל "Ewe", Standard Hebrew (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Standard_Hebrew) Raḥel, Tiberian Hebrew (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tiberian_Hebrew) Rāḫēl, Rāḥēl) is the second and favourite wife of Jacob (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacob) and mother of Joseph (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_%28dreamer%29) and Benjamin (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benjamin). She is the younger sister of Leah (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leah), Jacob's first wife, and both are daughters of Laban (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laban_%28Bible%29).

+Suomut+
Monday, August 30th, 2004, 04:13 AM
My name is Shannon (Irish/Gaelic)meaning:1. Shannon Wise one

where I got the info
http://www.thenamesite.com/cgi-bin/name_lookup.cgi?searchname=Shannon Here's some more info on "Shannon," darling:

The name is Anglicized Irish-Gaelic, of course.
The name is cognate to Shane/Seáin/Seán/Seanaigh/Seanach/etc., etc.

Its meaning is indeed either 'wise' or 'old.'

It's a river in Ireland too. ;)

:hug: :hug:

Milesian
Monday, August 30th, 2004, 04:30 PM
Here's some more info on "Shannon," darling:

The name is Anglicized Irish-Gaelic, of course.
The name is cognate to Shane/Seáin/Seán/Seanaigh/Seanach/etc., etc.

Its meaning is indeed either 'wise' or 'old.'

It's a river in Ireland too. ;)

:hug: :hug:



My guess is that most people take Shannon from the place-name, which itself is derived from the River Shannon (An tSionnan), which itself is named after the river goddess of the same name

Kerry is a similar name in this respect - from County Kerry (Ciarrai).
And Erin is another obvious one.

All fine names :)

+Suomut+
Monday, August 30th, 2004, 05:11 PM
My guess is that most people take Shannon from the place-name, which itself is derived from the River Shannon (An tSionnan), which itself is named after the river goddess of the same name.

All fine names :)Indeed, lad, I have little doubt that the name is given out precisely for the reason you indicate above. So, "tSionnan"="Shannon"...I did not have that listed in my resources ;) ...as I've already told Willowsprout, my little sister (below) is named thus...now I'll have to get her to change her spelling on St. Paty's Day!! lol ;) She has not one drop of Irish blood in her veins (that anyone knows about...she is part-Scottish :tongue: BTW), so the only reason I can figure she was given an Irish first name was that both her mother and father love/loved the Irish. :icon_bigg ;)

http://www.forums.skadi.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=446&stc=1

Milesian
Tuesday, August 31st, 2004, 10:19 AM
Indeed, lad, I have little doubt that the name is given out precisely for the reason you indicate above. So, "tSionnan"="Shannon"...I did not have that listed in my resources ;) ...as I've already told Willowsprout, my little sister (below) is named thus...now I'll have to get her to change her spelling on St. Paty's Day!! lol ;) She has not one drop of Irish blood in her veins (that anyone knows about...she is part-Scottish :tongue: BTW), so the only reason I can figure she was given an Irish first name was that both her mother and father love/loved the Irish. :icon_bigg ;)

http://www.forums.skadi.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=446&stc=1

I didn't know your sister's name was Shannon. Nice :D
Yeah "Sionnan" would be more correct (as the "t" at the start is due to the preceding word (An) when describing the river itself (lit. The Shannon)) and the extremely complex rules of Irish grammar ;).

Anyway, as you know the Scots originally came from Ireland anyway, so no biggie ;)

Gil
Friday, October 1st, 2004, 04:57 PM
Well, some of you might not want to share your first name but here it goes anyway...

Mine is Bruno.

Definition: From the Italian word for "brown," Bruno was, a nickname for a person with brown hair. From the German "brun," meaning dark, brown (refering to hair).

I was named Bruno cause I was born on St.Bruno's day. Simple as that. Damn catholics parents.... :P

Cheers ;)

Olga
Friday, October 1st, 2004, 05:27 PM
Well I use my true name here, it's a Slavic (Ruthenian exactly) version of the Germanic name Helga, meaning "fortunate", "healthy". St. Olga was the 10th century duchess of Kiev.

Tyr_
Friday, October 1st, 2004, 05:43 PM
My name is Julian. It's a version of Julius and an old Roman family name. This family goes back to the goddess Venus.
The famous last great Roman emperor Flavius Claudius Iulianus "Apostata" (= the Apostate) wanted to bring back the old Heathen religion to the yet Christian Roman Empire.

So I am very proud of my name for I am a Germanic Heathen and Anti-Christian!

Aristotle
Friday, October 1st, 2004, 07:43 PM
EYTYXEITE!
Dear Fellows, I'm a Hellene and my real name is "Aristotle". In my family, like me, all have ancient Hellenic names. The meaning of the word has to do with the "Perfect" ( Άριστον ) "End" ( Tέλος ) of a Life. Those who finish their life positively.
Aristotle named the ancient Hellenic philosoph from Stageira, a place in Northern Hellas.
Aristotle was the teacher of Alexander the Great and the author of "TA POLITIKA" ( "POLITICS" ), a real Nationalsocialist text, very aristocratic and of course against Democracy.

Verslingen
Friday, October 1st, 2004, 07:48 PM
My name is Eberhardt, it's is German. it means "Strong as a boar". I love name meanings. Here are my family's:
My wife-Julienne-fr. "youthful"
My childrens:
Harald-Dan. "War chief"
Raymond-English "Mighty protector"
Erik-Ger."Ever Powerful"
Evelyn-Irish "Life"
Catherine-greek "Pure"
My Dad's and mom's names:
Heinrich -German "Rules his household"
Agatha-"Good"
My Brothers are:
Albrecht-Ger. form of albert meaning "Noble, Bright"
Douglas-scottish "from dark water"
Reynard-Ger "fox"

My sisters are:
Adeline- Ger."Woman of noble estate." -
Geraldine- Ger."mighty with a spear"
Else-Ger. "Noble"
My father was very much into germans names except for my brother Douglas. I think the names my wife and I choose give our children confidence and strength. My sons love to pretend to be warriors and run around with our dogs hunting imaginary beasts, monsters and enemies. My daughters are like princess who definatly live up to their names.

Cheers!

Verslingen :fwedding: Mere
and

:fhhorse:Harald :fhhorse:Raymond :fhhorse: Erik :pblob Evelyn:pblob Catherine

Jack
Saturday, October 2nd, 2004, 09:39 AM
My name is Kenneth, it's Scottish, and it means handsome, though I once met another Kenneth who said it means 'handsome leader' in Irish or something.

TisaAnne
Saturday, October 2nd, 2004, 09:51 AM
My first name is Tisa (pronounced like "Lisa")...and I have no idea what it means. :shrug My father named me and he doesn't know why he chose it, or where he heard it from. I have never met anyone else with my name before either.

Hagalaz
Saturday, October 2nd, 2004, 10:05 AM
My first name Ryan, is Gaelic for "little king" or "lower ruler". Hail Eire

Esther_Helena
Saturday, October 2nd, 2004, 10:55 AM
I'm Abby, NOT Abigail.
Abby - source of joy

Abby is derived from Abigail, which comes from the Hebrew name,Avigayil...
Av - father, i - of, gayil - joy

I was named after my greatgrandma, so I can forgive the fact that my first name basically means "Father of" :lol:

Even worse is when you toss in the meaning of my middle and surnames, then I am
"Father of godlike manly vigour" or "Father of godlike strength of men"
:wtf:

WarMaiden
Sunday, October 3rd, 2004, 04:09 AM
Victoria "Latin for Victory"!

Awar
Sunday, October 3rd, 2004, 04:35 AM
My name is of Greek origin, meaning stone.
Therefore I rock. :D

@TisaAnne:
Tisa is the name of a couple of rivers in various Slavic countries,
and it's also a name for a sort of trees.

svartabrandr
Sunday, October 3rd, 2004, 06:09 AM
My first name is Charles it means manly or full grown. :D :naughty
It is of Germanic origin and it is derrived from the word karl which meant man.

Siegmund
Sunday, October 3rd, 2004, 09:38 AM
My name is Mark, from Mars, the Roman god of war. The primary extended meaning is "warlike," which suits me fine.

Johannes de León
Sunday, October 3rd, 2004, 09:59 AM
@ TisaAnne:

You name is probably a derivation of Tisha, that is a short form of Latisha, that is a variant of Letitia.

Letitia f
From the Late Latin name Laetitia which meant "joy, happiness".

Aistulf
Sunday, October 3rd, 2004, 12:27 PM
Marco, Latin name meaning "warlike."

Ewergrin
Sunday, October 3rd, 2004, 05:47 PM
TROY m
Usage: English
Pronounced: TROI
From a surname that originally denoted a person from the city of Troyes in France. This was also the name of the ancient city that was besieged by the Greeks in Homer's 'Iliad'.

Depending on the source, it is also Gaelic for "foot soldier."

Zyklop
Sunday, October 3rd, 2004, 06:22 PM
@TisaAnne:
Tisa is the name of a couple of rivers in various Slavic countries,
and it's also a name for a sort of trees.

@ TisaAnne:

You name is probably a derivation of Tisha, that is a short form of Latisha, that is a variant of Letitia.

Letitia f
From the Late Latin name Laetitia which meant "joy, happiness".

Nice try but your Slavo-Mediterranean claims are desperate.The name is Prussian. For example:

Tisa von der Schulenburg (http://www.tisa-von-der-schulenburg.de/schleb.htm)

Awar
Sunday, October 3rd, 2004, 06:31 PM
@Zyklop: :P

It's the name of a Prussian person, that doesn't mean it's of Prussian origin :P :P :P
:D Not to mention the Slavic origin of Prussians, Prussian toponyms, surnames, and even names :)

Zyklop
Sunday, October 3rd, 2004, 06:48 PM
@Zyklop: :P

It's the name of a Prussian person, that doesn't mean it's of Prussian origin :P :P :P
:D Not to mention the Slavic origin of Prussians, Prussian toponyms, surnames, and even names :)

Yeah, for sure. You call only trees and rivers with this name and Prussians would use it for the daugthers of aristocrats and officers.... :anieyes

It´s very interesting that each time a nice Germanic lady shows up, the forces of Slavia are lurking behind and try to drag her to their lair....

:skull
I think we shall make another Teutonic conquest towards the East and give you Slavs a lesson about the true origins of the Prussians.
:skull

Johannes de León
Sunday, October 3rd, 2004, 06:51 PM
Yeah, for sure. You call only trees and rivers with this name and Prussians would use it for the daugthers of aristocrats and officers.... :anieyes

It´s very interesting that each time a nice Germanic lady shows up, the forces of Slavia are lurking behind and trying to drag her to their lair....

:skull
I think we shall make another Teutonic conquest towards the East and give you Slavs a lesson about the true origins of the Prussians.
:skull
Well, this is about etymologies (origin), not where they can be found. :eyes

Awar
Sunday, October 3rd, 2004, 06:52 PM
I never said she's Slavic, I just gave a better explanation of what her name could mean than your explanation :P



I think we shall make another Teutonic conquest towards the East and give you Slavs a lesson about the true origins of the Prussians.

Please do. Perhaps this time Russians will take more than just east Germany. :P ;)

Ewergrin
Sunday, October 3rd, 2004, 06:55 PM
Let's keep it civil, gentlemen. This thread is about the origin of first names. Let's keep it that way, please.

Zyklop
Sunday, October 3rd, 2004, 06:57 PM
Please do. Perhaps this time Prussians will take more than just east Germany. :P ;)

Prussians indeed will recapture east Germany and far beyond... :)

Stríbog
Sunday, October 3rd, 2004, 07:01 PM
Hate to break up the party, but Germany is foreign-occupied ZOG territory and Russia can't even handle a tiny breakaway group of rebels on her southern border, so I don't think the two will be going to war anytime soon.

Strengthandhonour
Sunday, October 3rd, 2004, 07:02 PM
Now this is interesting.
My first name is Luigi, a while ago I had searched and my name meaning was "renowned fighter". I just searched again when I saw this just to make sure and I found the following, it has two meanings:
Origin: German
Meaning: Famous fighter.

Origin: Italian
Meaning: Renowned fighter. Form of the French Louis.

Awar
Sunday, October 3rd, 2004, 07:04 PM
In any case, I gave some info about the name TISA etimology, which has a couple of meanings in Slavic language. That doesn't make TisaAnne Slavic, just like Zyklop's first name doesn't make him Jewish ( I hope :D ).

Zyklop
Sunday, October 3rd, 2004, 07:07 PM
In any case, I gave some info about the name TISA etimology, which has a couple of meanings in Slavic language. That doesn't make TisaAnne Slavic, just like Zyklop's first name doesn't make him Jewish ( I hope :D ).

Now, why would you now my name? :-O
But it is indeed Jewish and I´m not kidding you, I´m ashamed about it. :(

Stríbog
Sunday, October 3rd, 2004, 07:08 PM
My first name comes from Yohanan, like Rabbi ben Yohanan. :P It means "YHWH is gracious." I never really cared that I had a Jewish first name, it doesn't define who I am anyway.

L'Chaim! ;)

Awar
Sunday, October 3rd, 2004, 07:12 PM
Now, why would you now my name? :-O
But it is indeed Jewish and I´m not kidding you, I´m ashamed about it. :(

Hehehe... I guessed.
It was indicative that it would be Jewish, since you contributed to this thread without mentioning your name :D

Awar
Sunday, October 3rd, 2004, 07:15 PM
btw. the names which are perceived as 'Jewish' are often just Semitic, or judaised versions of Greek and some IE names.

There are of course uber-cool ancient Semitic peoples like Assyrians and others :)

Stríbog
Sunday, October 3rd, 2004, 07:18 PM
btw. the names which are perceived as 'Jewish' are often just Semitic, or judaised versions of Greek and some IE names.

There are of course uber-cool ancient Semitic peoples like Assyrians and others :)

I'm quite certain Yohanan was originally Jewish, making all the names deriving from it, like mine, Jewish in origin. :P

Zyklop
Sunday, October 3rd, 2004, 07:21 PM
Hehehe... I guessed.
It was indicative that it would be Jewish, since you contributed to this thread without mentioning your name :D

Oh, ok. I just feared that Rusalka would have forwarded you sensible data (nude pics and such) :-O

On topic:
My father´s and grandfather´s name, Alfred, is Germanic and means "He who advises with elfish help".
(Although I can´t agree on this... :D )

Awar
Sunday, October 3rd, 2004, 07:26 PM
Oh, ok. I just feared that Rusalka would have forwarded you sensible data (nude pics and such) :-O

No, Rusalka never sent me any child pornography. :D


On topic:
My father´s and grandfather´s name, Alfred, is Germanic and means "He who advises with elfish help".
(Although I can´t agree on this... :D )

...So, it was those damn elves who advised him to give you a Jewish name ;)

Seriously, Alf = Elf ?
What about those other names that begin with 'Al' or 'Alf'?

Zyklop
Sunday, October 3rd, 2004, 07:41 PM
No, Rusalka never sent me any child pornography. :D
I was just trying to make you jealous.

...So, it was those damn elves who advised him to give you a Jewish name ;)
Now that you mention it, more and more things come to mind... :D

Seriously, Alf = Elf ?
What about those other names that begin with 'Al' or 'Alf'?

Al mostly comes from Germanic adal which means noble, like in Albert (noble glance), Adolf (noble wolf) or Alfons (noble willed). Alfred however is the only male Germanic name which includes elfs, as far as I know.

Zyklop
Sunday, October 3rd, 2004, 08:25 PM
Now this is interesting.
My first name is Luigi, a while ago I had searched and my name meaning was "renowned fighter". I just searched again when I saw this just to make sure and I found the following, it has two meanings:
Origin: German
Meaning: Famous fighter.

Origin: Italian
Meaning: Renowned fighter. Form of the French Louis.

Ludwig is Germanic for glorious warrior. Luigi is the Italian and Louis the French version.

Stríbog
Sunday, October 3rd, 2004, 08:28 PM
Ludwig is Germanic for glorious warrior. Luigi is the Italian and Louis the French version.

In addition, Lewis is the British Isles form, Luis the Spanish/Portuguese version, and Ludovicus the Latin form. All can be traced back to the Germanic origin, though.

Awar
Sunday, October 3rd, 2004, 08:35 PM
Or, it's source is in Ljudevit, Slavic, meaning... Macho! :D

Esther_Helena
Sunday, October 3rd, 2004, 09:15 PM
if you don't like your name, you can change it.
I'm not too fond of having a name that is based on one from the Bible... I'm pagan. It's like having an Athiest named Christian :wtf I do like it though, as I was named after my greatgrandma :D
Too bad Hitler has such a negative connotation in America, :~( Adolf is a great name, noble wolf? Who wouldn't like a name with that kind of meaning, instead of some trendy teenybopper name. Americans need to realize names have meanings...

Zyklop
Sunday, October 3rd, 2004, 09:28 PM
An informative site about first names:
http://www.behindthename.com/usage.html

And about Germanic, Semitic, Greek, Celtic and Slavic etymological elements:
http://www.behindthename.com/elements.html

QuietWind
Wednesday, October 20th, 2004, 02:22 AM
My name is Jennifer. Surprise! :D From what I have found, it is of Welsh or Celtic origin and is derived from Guinevere. It has various similar meanings such as "Fair one," "White one," "White wave," "White wonder," or "white and soft."

My mother has always commented on how funny it is when she hears of a black little girl named Jennifer.

Waldgeist
Wednesday, October 20th, 2004, 09:51 AM
I'm not too fond of having a name that is based on one from the Bible... I'm pagan. It's like having an Athiest named Christian :wtfYeah, same here. My name is a Dutch pet form of Maria and I have absolutely no clue why my parents called me like that, with them being not religious and all. I guess they just liked the name.

My brother, on the other hand, does have a beautiful Germanic name, meaning "friend of the wild boar". :thumbup

Übersoldat
Wednesday, October 20th, 2004, 01:58 PM
My first name is Domagoj, after a 9th century Croat ruler.

Domagoj (864-876) Croatian duke (Dux Croatorum). Domagoj defeated the Venetians at sea, and together with the Franks he conquered Bari in Italy from the Arabs. The Venetians called him "sclavorum pessimus dux" (the worse duke of the Slavs) while the Pope called him "duci glorioso" (glorious duke).

More on Croatian: http://hr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Domagoj

Evolved
Wednesday, October 20th, 2004, 03:02 PM
Sarah is a nice Jewish name meaning "princess" or "lady." :D
http://images.customwebcart.com/big/big-866-30405.jpg

My name translated into Korean is Kong-Ju: http://www.skadi.net/~ladygoeth/korean.gif

Aistulf
Wednesday, October 20th, 2004, 04:13 PM
Sarah is a nice Jewish name meaning "princess" or "lady." :D
http://images.customwebcart.com/big/big-866-30405.jpg

My name translated into Korean is Kong-Ju: http://www.skadi.net/~ladygoeth/korean.gif
Suits you perfectly :P

Stríbog
Wednesday, October 20th, 2004, 09:41 PM
My name translated into Korean is Kong-Ju: http://www.skadi.net/~ladygoeth/korean.gif

Altaic unity? :P

gorgeousgal2k2
Wednesday, October 20th, 2004, 09:47 PM
My name means "a little lamb, a ewe, one with purity" - or "innocent lamb".

Prussian
Wednesday, October 20th, 2004, 09:54 PM
........my first name means "man from the west" and it's of old english/anglo saxon origins.

gorgeousgal2k2
Wednesday, October 20th, 2004, 09:55 PM
that's a bit less embarrassing than mine :rofl

Prussian
Wednesday, October 20th, 2004, 10:08 PM
that's a bit less embarrassing than mine :rofl......I would not say your name is embarassing, the "one with purity" meaning is something to value, as it has deeper significance especially in this day & age.

Aistulf
Wednesday, October 20th, 2004, 10:13 PM
Altaic unity? :P
Finnish is an Uralic language, actually. But I guess she agrees more with the Pan-Turanians (see her latest banners :cuss)

It's funny to see that she's a respected " 'European' preservationinst" by some...

Stríbog
Thursday, October 21st, 2004, 02:16 AM
Finnish is an Uralic language, actually. But I guess she agrees more with the Pan-Turanians (see her latest banners :cuss)

It's funny to see that she's a respected " 'European' preservationinst" by some...

The Ugric, Finnic, Turkic and Altaic branches are all part of one family.

Not only is she respected, she's the best Skadi member of 2003. ;)

Libertad
Thursday, October 21st, 2004, 03:44 AM
X
Usage: German
Pet form of XX.

XX
Usage: German, Danish
German and Danish short form of XXX

XXX
Usage: English
Derived from Greek xxxx meaning "pearl".

X
Elements in Germanic Names
"noble" from Old German adal, Old English æðel

PrincessAlia
Saturday, October 23rd, 2004, 10:05 PM
My name is Alia Daphne. Alia ia Arabic and means "noble or stately." Daphne is Greek and means "laurel." I am not an arab nor greek though. :P

Briar's Luck
Wednesday, December 29th, 2004, 01:25 PM
My first name, McKenna, is actually my Mother's maiden name.

TheAnglian
Wednesday, December 29th, 2004, 03:33 PM
I have a hebrew first name and my surname means angel.

Alfred Jodl
Wednesday, December 29th, 2004, 04:37 PM
Friedrich

which means:

"fridu" = Freedom, "rihhi" = rich or mighty/powerfull

I like my name alot. Alot of in my age don't do so, though

None the less I think it's quite a nice name

cosmocreator
Thursday, December 30th, 2004, 12:22 AM
My first name, McKenna, is actually my Mother's maiden name.


I assumed that was you last name. Does your last name begin with "Mc" or "Mac"?

USS Dixiecrat
Thursday, December 30th, 2004, 12:28 AM
Richard in my full name. My father's name is also Richard, and if I have a son I intend on passing it on. It is along the lines of "mighty ruler" which is what I am, and strive to be. I love my name :beer-smil

This is a good site I found awhile back, hope it helps: http://www.behindthename.com/

friedrich braun
Thursday, December 30th, 2004, 12:30 AM
Michael.

Origin and Meaning of First Name Michael

What is the ethnic origin?
Hebrew

What does it mean?
Who is like God.

What's the gender (commonly)?
Male

http://www.weddingvendors.com/baby-names/meaning/michael

Briar's Luck
Thursday, December 30th, 2004, 07:07 AM
I assumed that was you last name. Does your last name begin with "Mc" or "Mac"?


Last name also begins with Mc... I have heard of another woman with the same name, but it was spelled Makenna, I believe.

Stig NHF
Thursday, December 30th, 2004, 11:20 AM
Stig.
Derived from old-norse "Stigr" , meaning "path" or "path of the warrior".

Blood_Axis
Thursday, December 30th, 2004, 11:25 AM
Heh ;)

My name is Danae, an ancient Greek name with an interesting myth behind it... :icon_redf

Read all about the myth here: http://www.loggia.com/myth/danae.html :)

jcs
Thursday, December 30th, 2004, 02:12 PM
Jay Carl
Jay- father's name. Beyond this, it has no meaning, being the "phoenetic short form of various names beginning with the letter 'J'" according to every site I've been to.

Carl- grandfather's name. Apparently this is the German form of Charles. Charles is the Anglicized form of the Old German Karl (couldn't Carl just be an alternate form of spelling Karl? apparently not :laugh: ), meaning "free man."

Patria
Thursday, December 30th, 2004, 03:50 PM
My first name is Robert, an ancient germanic name which means "shining fame". :viking3:

Germanische Namenskunde (http://www.runenkunde.de/vornamen.htm)

Nomen est Omen!
("Der Name ist ein Vorzeichen")

Freja
Thursday, January 6th, 2005, 05:59 PM
My first name is derived from the greek name Helen and means "bright one". My middle name is Marie, derived from the hebrew name Mirjam and is thought to mean "beautiful".

Northern Paladin
Thursday, January 6th, 2005, 09:56 PM
My first name Spencer is old English for Good Steward.

ChrisDownUnder
Friday, January 7th, 2005, 04:16 AM
CHRISTOPHER:

Means "bearing Christ", derived from Late Greek Christos combined with pherein "to bear, to carry". Christopher was the legendary saint who carried the young Jesus across a river.
He is strong, handsome and intelligent and sets a good example for others. A man you can rely on.

'Behind the Name' is a great site. I will use it to pick names for my children and pets!

Naggaroth
Friday, January 7th, 2005, 01:45 PM
My first name is Per which is scandinavian form of Peter (see earlier in this discussion). End my middle name is in norwegian: Øyvind, in english it is OEyvind or Eyvind or even Oyvind. This name derives from the same as the old nordic and islandic Eysteinn which means ey = island and steinn = stone. The name comes from the old vikings which used it for about thousand years ago.
Here in Trondheim where one of the most hated persons during the 14th century, he was named Eystein Engelbretsson. He was the last roman catholic priests here in Norway. He was also abandoned from Norway in 14th century.

My last name is Hansen which is comming from old scandinavic culture where there was normal that the sons got their fathers name as last name. Such as Grimsson, Ericsson, etc. And my last name, Hansen is derived from Hansson, I'm the son of Hans which is a shortform og Johannes.
The problem here is that I should have had another last name like Jensen(Jensson) or Jacobsen(Jacobsson). But my grandfather had to change his name when he was going/joining the army because that there were so many people which had the same last name. So this is the reason why my last name is Hansen.

Draugr
Saturday, January 8th, 2005, 05:48 AM
My first name is 'Seamus' Irish for james (origin Hebrew Jacob-the surplanter), my last name is dirived from the Latin "sparsus" and means 'one from a barren place" it is taken from a town near Pamplona.

NorwegianFury
Sunday, January 23rd, 2005, 10:41 PM
My name is Øystein which is a derivative from the name "Eysteinn".

Comes from the old Norse element Øy/Ey = island and stein/steinn = stone.

:)

Thobjorn
Wednesday, March 16th, 2005, 02:08 AM
my first name is anglo saxon in origin, having to do with stoneworking, and stoneworkers. my surname is germanic, its one of those nickname surnames, meaning foot, or feet, or something to with those. :icon_redf i like to think one of my ancestors was fleet of foot, but with my luck they just had a deformed foot, or something.

Lena_rus
Wednesday, March 16th, 2005, 03:26 PM
My first name is derived from the greek name Helen and means "bright one".

My name (Elena) is of the same origin :beer1:

Sonja
Wednesday, March 16th, 2005, 05:16 PM
My first name is a Germanic form of the Greek name Sophia which means 'wise'.

Luh_Windan
Wednesday, March 16th, 2005, 05:25 PM
This name is Old English for "wound up" or something, but I only learned that after I chose it... it's a random song title that I chose to use in haste while signing up to some forums one day.

CanadianWhite
Tuesday, March 22nd, 2005, 04:22 PM
What the..... My parents gave me a yid name :annoysigr

JONATHAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: JAHN-a-than [key]
Extra Info: Popularity, Related Names, Namesakes, Name Days
Options: Contribute Information
From the Hebrew name Yehonatan (contracted to Yonatan) meaning "YAHWEH has given". In the Old Testament Jonathan was the eldest son of Saul and a friend of David. He was killed in battle with the Philistines. A famous bearer of this name was Jonathan Swift, the satirist who wrote 'Gulliver's Travels' and other works.

fenriSS_
Saturday, March 26th, 2005, 11:30 PM
I don't know what my first names mean, but i'm pretty sure it's from my relatives and family. My surname is the two "adam and eva's" in norse mythology. Liv and livtrase. Together this is my surname. Well i got two, the other is from an ancient farm in Norway..

beowulf wodenson
Sunday, March 27th, 2005, 08:42 PM
What the..... My parents gave me a yid name Same here I'm afraid. Both my first and middle names are hebrew in origin and mean 'Yaweh remembers' and 'Yaweh hears' I think. :speechles I didn't pick 'em, my parents are very devout baptist christians, hence bibilical names. My soon-to-be born son will be named 'William Riley' after ancestors, no bible-jew names there. :viking1: William is old Germanic from Wil Helm, 'strong defender', Riley is Irish Gaelic in origin meaning 'valiant one'. I was badly named, but at least my son won't be!
My surname is English in origin, meaning 'crooked or bent' from an old British celtic personal name I believe.

Todesritter
Sunday, March 27th, 2005, 09:19 PM
Same here I'm afraid. Both my first and middle names are hebrew in origin and mean 'Yaweh remembers' and 'Yaweh hears' I think. :speechles I didn't pick 'em, my parents are very devout baptist christians, hence bibilical names. My soon-to-be born son will be named 'William Riley' after ancestors, no bible-jew names there. :viking1: William is old Germanic from Wil Helm, 'strong defender', Riley is Irish Gaelic in origin meaning 'valiant one'. I was badly named, but at least my son won't be!
My surname is English in origin, meaning 'crooked or bent' from an old British celtic personal name I believe.

Anyone here interested in starting a Thread for more aboriginal, names from the regions of our ancestors? i.e. pre-Christian Germanic, Slavic, Celtic, etc.. names?

For instance I lucked out with my real life name, in that I have two middle names in addition to my surname and given name, and they are all pre-Christian. [ First Name = pre-Roman Scottish, Middle name #1 = pre-Christian Irish, Middle name #2 = Famous Gothic Chieftain’s name, Surname = ancient Toponym in England.]

I don’t know how many of our members are expecting, but if there are more with babies on the way, we could help them with a list of suggestions for baby-names that would more accurately honor their heritage, and at least not encumber them with a Biblical or otherwise Hebrew name.


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

EXAMPLE:

Gothic:
Attaulf
Alaric
Ulfilas
..
.

Gaelic:
Aidan
Alana
Angus
Archibald
Arthur
Blair
Brendan
Brian
Bridgit
Craig
Deirdre
Donovan
Dylan
Enid
Erin
..
.

Teutonic:
Ulric
Helmut
Elke
..
.

Old-Norse:
Astrid
Brend
Dagmar
Dustin
Eric
Erica
Helga
..
.

Slavic:
Danika
..
.


-----------------------------------------------------------------------
Anyone else in favor of a separate Thread, or maybe even a Sticky somewhere to help people with a list of non-Biblical options? :)

Erlingr Hárbarðarson
Monday, March 28th, 2005, 01:43 AM
Todesritter

I like your idea very much, but I want to see you change the headings of your names to "Of X Origin", e.g. Of Gaelic Origin and Of Norse Origin contra Norse, Gaelic, etc., on account of what you wrote being not Norse, the Gaelic is different when translated for these names and so forth. These are all anglicised names and are therefor of absolute inferiourity to those of the original and ancient form and should be recognised as such cowardly titles. Thanks on you for your ear at this matter.

Todesritter
Monday, March 28th, 2005, 01:55 AM
Todesritter

I like your idea very much, but I want to see you change the headings of your names to "Of X Origin", e.g. Of Gaelic Origin and Of Norse Origin contra Norse, Gaelic, etc., on account of what you wrote being not Norse, the Gaelic is different when translated for these names and so forth. These are all anglicised names and are therefor of absolute inferiourity to those of the original and ancient form and should be recognised as such cowardly titles. Thanks on you for your ear at this matter.
Right, exactly the sort of feedback I was looking for. As a person coming from a monoculture Anglo-centric country, I am not qualified to do justice to these names, and was hoping a Moderator (hint hint) or other member who could do it more properly than I* would start the Thread or Sticky. [* I only know English, German, a little Russian, a little Dutch, a little Old English, some Spanish, and some Japanese….]

If you PM me, or otherwise respond, with the specific edits to put things in their native form I should make to the above post I made, I will gladly copy & paste the changes into and edit, I had merely intended the bottom portion of the post to be an example of the format of such a list somone else would start in the future, but I don’t wish it to be an offensive example.

The Horned God
Monday, March 28th, 2005, 05:47 PM
Giving me an Irish name instead of a biblical one was one of the best things my parents have ever done for me, I can't over-rate its value to me now, even though in school I was sometimes teased for it by fools with more common names.

Here's a site which lists Irish names along with audio files containing the correct pronounciation and a paragraph about the historical namesake.

http://www.babynamesofireland.com/pages/boy-names-a-c.html

Vanir
Tuesday, March 29th, 2005, 01:58 PM
better safe than sorry I guess....

ErikBloodaxe
Tuesday, March 29th, 2005, 07:46 PM
MATTERN ~ commonly found in Silesia. comes from latin "motherly" and Saint Maternus of Cologne.

IlPrincipe
Wednesday, April 6th, 2005, 07:17 PM
Well, my name is David so no translations are necessary i think =)

Krissi
Wednesday, April 6th, 2005, 07:37 PM
My name is Kristófer which is Icelandic/Scandinavian variant of Christopher



CHRISTOPHER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KRIS-to-fur [key]
Extra Info: Popularity, Related Names, Namesakes, Websites, Comments
Options: Contribute Information
Means "bearing Christ", derived from Late Greek Christos combined with pherein "to bear, to carry". Christopher was the legendary saint who carried the young Jesus across a river. He is the patron saint of travellers. Another famous bearer was Christopher Columbus, the explorer who reached the West Indies in the 15th century.

Oddstríðir
Friday, May 13th, 2005, 12:09 AM
I have three names including my father's name (patronym system), all of them are Norse.

I'll give you the first which is Guðmundur. Originally Goðmundr and was first written of in context with a mythical king of old in Sweden in a mythical kingdom called Glæsivellir.

It means: the hand of the gods and thus the tool of the gods and it also means the defender of the gods.

This name of mine serves me well, and the others do too enfact. (Erlingr, já, eg har begynnt at skrife engelsk litt som dig ;))

Arcturus
Friday, May 13th, 2005, 02:53 PM
My name : Danish form of John, which is an English form of Johannes, which was the Latin form of the Greek name Ioannes, itself derived from the Hebrew name Yochanan meaning "YAHWEH is gracious". This name owes its consistent popularity to two New Testament characters, both highly revered as saints. The first was John the Baptist, the forerunner of Jesus Christ and a victim of beheading by Herod Antipas. The second was the apostle John, also supposedly the author of the fourth Gospel and Revelation. The name has been borne by 23 popes, as well as kings of England, Hungary, Poland, Portugal and France. It was also borne by the poet John Milton and the philosopher John Locke."

Theudanaz
Friday, May 13th, 2005, 06:45 PM
My first is biblical, but I have an old second name, Edward "Blessing-guard" or "Treasure-guard" from OE Eadweard (Edward Muybridge the famous photographer/artist, changed his name back to this old spelling). It is one of the more popular names in Europe that originated from Old English, meaning it spread to many countries, probably after the English king of the same name. It's Proto-Germanic equivalent might be Audawardaz, Go. Aud(a)wards, ON. ? Edvardr or something like that.

In this name I see a role or ideal for myself, to protect and preserve the blessings handed down to me from my ancestors in their wealth, words, blood and traditions, lest they be lost, destroyed, despised or trampled upon. It is a privelege to keep their memory holy.

Patria
Tuesday, March 28th, 2006, 03:20 AM
My first name is Robert and it means "bright fame", derived from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and beraht "bright". :fwink:

a. b.
Tuesday, March 28th, 2006, 08:03 AM
I am Rasmus. My name is a Danish version of Greek erasmios, meaning beloved.
My name is not biblical. :thumbup

Jäger
Tuesday, March 28th, 2006, 09:35 AM
My name is Karl, derived from karal and means the strenuous, the free or the husband, quite a contradiction :D

Blutwölfin
Wednesday, March 29th, 2006, 09:26 AM
Inga
Of Scandinavian/Old Norse origin, meaning "guarded by Ing" (Ing = Yngvi Freyr = presided over fertility, sunlight and rain, and was the husband of the frost giantess Gerd) and derives from Ingwaz, which possibly means "he who is foremost".

Blood_Axis
Wednesday, March 29th, 2006, 09:33 AM
Danae (http://www.loggia.com/myth/danae.html) ;)

Frau_Hierl
Wednesday, March 29th, 2006, 09:44 AM
Eva, biblical Hebrew name meaning "life" or "living one".

Weg
Wednesday, March 29th, 2006, 10:59 AM
I am proud of mine, it means "brave power" in Germanic. :thumbup

Heksulv
Wednesday, March 29th, 2006, 02:02 PM
Marilyn. My parents named me that because most of my female relatives were named Mary, and my mother's name was Lynn. They didn't look up a meaning for it, but when I did, it seems to be an adaptation of "Mary" and it means 'Sorrow/Bitterness"

I have mixed feelings about my name. I don't like it because it's a Christian name with a negative meaning, but I like it because there aren't a bunch of other people with the same name. I feel bad for all the girls named "Brittany" or "Samantha" because there's just so many.

Thusnelda
Friday, March 31st, 2006, 12:42 PM
Julia

Origin: Latin

Meaning: softhaired, youthful, downy-haired, gentle

RusViking
Friday, March 31st, 2006, 02:31 PM
RICHARD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Czech Pronounced: RICH-ard (English), ree-SHAR (French) [key] (http://www.behindthename.com/pronunciation.php)
Means "brave power", derived from the Germanic elements ric "power, rule" and hard "brave, hardy". The Normans introduced this name to Britain. It was borne by three kings of England including Richard the Lionheart, leader of the Third Crusade in the 12th century. Two German opera composers, Richard Wagner and Richard Strauss, have also had this name.

newenstad
Friday, March 31st, 2006, 03:37 PM
Bernhard
from the Old High German pero "Bär/bear", and harti "hart/hard" (stark/strong, mutig/brave)

Galaico
Friday, March 31st, 2006, 06:12 PM
My name means salvation in Hellenized Hebrew, just figure it out...:)

Drömmarnas Stig
Friday, March 31st, 2006, 06:15 PM
My first name was the most popular in NS-Germany.
The Englisch translation is the first name of the current US-president.
The origin is Greek and means "peasant".

Who am I? ;)

Chlodovech
Saturday, April 1st, 2006, 12:21 AM
Rafaël ( pronounced: rah-fah-EL). It has Spanish roots, that's what I learned from a little use of of Google. It means: 'God heals', 'God has healed' and 'healed by God'.

It's a variant of Raphael (Hebrew).

My grandmother named me after an archangel.



http://www.metaphysicalteachings.com/images/Arcangel%20Rafael.jpg

Theudiskaz
Saturday, April 1st, 2006, 12:26 AM
My first name was the most popular in NS-Germany.
The Englisch translation is the first name of the current US-president.
The origin is Greek and means "peasant".


Joerg, right?

Theudiskaz
Saturday, April 1st, 2006, 12:35 AM
From the Hebrew name זְכַרְיָה (Zekaryah) which meant "YAHWEH (http://www.behindthename.com/php/view.php?name=yahweh) remembers". Zechariah was a minor prophet of the Old Testament, author of the Book of Zechariah. This is also the name of the father of John the Baptist in the New Testament, who was temporarily made dumb because of his disbelief.My name is Zachary. Very much in the Anglo-American tradition. Sadly that's about as Hebrew a name as I could have possibly been given. Thanks Mom and Dad, you twits.

RedJack
Saturday, April 1st, 2006, 12:43 AM
My name is Latin, it means a warrior or a hammer.

Northern Paladin
Saturday, April 1st, 2006, 12:44 AM
Spencer it means good steward in old english.:)

Gorm the Old
Saturday, April 1st, 2006, 01:58 AM
Er, Northern Paladin, "steward" means "sty-ward" or, "he who guards the pig-sty" in Old English. My given name is from the Latin and means "of Mars" Maybe that explains my feeling of kinship toward John Carter of Mars in the old Edgar Rice Burroughs stories . Actually, I was named for my mother's favorite uncle who was no more Martian than I am. He was a machinist who played the classical guitar and who once told me "vell, de guitar iss all vell and gewd, but de REAL instrument iss de sitar."

Theudiskaz
Saturday, April 1st, 2006, 02:06 AM
Er, Northern Paladin, "steward" means "sty-ward" or, "he who guards the pig-sty"

I think he meant steward in the modern sense of guardian or protector, not AS stige-weard. But I'm not sure about the etymology of Spencer. I'd like to know what elements it derives from.

RusViking
Saturday, April 1st, 2006, 02:15 AM
My name is Zachary. Very much in the Anglo-American tradition. Sadly that's about as Hebrew a name as I could have possibly been given. Thanks Mom and Dad, you twits.

Well, I named my daughter Rachel....duh.....Hebrew...little lamb. The only consolation is that it is also a German, English and French name. Well, it was big at the time.:-O

Theudiskaz
Saturday, April 1st, 2006, 02:24 AM
I'm sorry.:~(

Vilay
Saturday, April 1st, 2006, 02:34 AM
My name is Viviane,
and it means:
The Lady of the Lake and/or living, lively
Originally from Arthurian-Legend

Theudiskaz
Saturday, April 1st, 2006, 02:35 AM
Schoener Name.:thumbup

Zyklop
Saturday, April 1st, 2006, 08:44 AM
Well, I named my daughter Rachel....duh.....Hebrew...little lamb. The only consolation is that it is also a German...It´s not a German name and also not a name that is used here at all.

Jäger
Saturday, April 1st, 2006, 09:15 AM
It´s not a German name and also not a name that is used here at all.
I heard it in Switzerland a few times, mabye because of the french part!?

RusViking
Saturday, April 1st, 2006, 09:18 AM
It´s not a German name and also not a name that is used here at all.
You know, this rabid anti-Jewish thing is getting pretty tiresome. Find something positive to work on.

Rachel
Gender: feminine.
Usage: English, Jewish, French, German, Biblical

newenstad
Saturday, April 1st, 2006, 09:23 AM
Rachel
Gender: feminine.
Usage: English, Jewish, French, German, Biblical

Well Rachel is maybe used in Germany but it isn´t a German name...

Rachel (רָחֵל "Ewe", also "innocence and gentility of a rose " and may mean "lovely". Standard Hebrew (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Standard_Hebrew) Raḥel, Tiberian Hebrew (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tiberian_Hebrew) Rāḫēl, (Source (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rachel))

Jäger
Saturday, April 1st, 2006, 09:30 AM
You know, this rabid anti-Jewish thing is getting pretty tiresome. Find something positive to work on. Honestly, you will really have to try hard to find any Rachels in Germany.
If you pronouce it german, it sounds very weird, as I said, I met a few girls from Switzerland that were named Rachel, and everyone from Germany, had to surpress a laughter first.
Then again, those Rünzis, and Kümlis or whatever always sound weird :D:D:D

So there might be a german variant, but whatever, it is neither a german name, nor a popular one, just plain objectivly spoken. Nothing to argue on that.

RusViking
Saturday, April 1st, 2006, 09:37 AM
You guys are right of course. It is of Hebrew origin. It's just a name that was picked up by other countries. It was big in American when my daughter was born and not being as "enlightened" as I am now regarding preserving my heritage, we named her Rachel.

If I could change it I would.

Luckily my parents knew what they were doing. They named me Richard and my brother Eric!

Weg
Saturday, April 1st, 2006, 09:56 AM
Rachel is not popular in France either.

symmakhos
Saturday, April 1st, 2006, 10:02 AM
I think most European names are "Christian" in one way or another, either Biblical or derived from some saint or other -- no matter if they are Germanic, Semitic, Slavic, Celtic, Greek, or Latin.

At the time my parents were born it was common in Sweden to give children old Norse names, such as Gunnar, Tore, Ulf, Siv; but unfortunately those names sound very goofy and unfashionable to most people nowadays.

RusViking
Saturday, April 1st, 2006, 10:12 AM
I think most European names are "Christian" in one way or another, either Biblical or derived from some saint or other -- no matter if they are Germanic, Semitic, Slavic, Celtic, Greek, or Latin.

At the time my parents were born it was common in Sweden to give children old Norse names, such as Gunnar, Tore, Ulf, Siv; but unfortunately those names sound very goofy and unfashionable to most people nowadays.

I love those names!

Thusnelda
Saturday, April 1st, 2006, 10:45 AM
Usage: English, Jewish, French, German, Biblical
"Rachel" as a name isnt used in Germany. It hasnt anything to do with Antijudaism, its just a fact that this name is definately not German.

symmakhos
Saturday, April 1st, 2006, 11:25 AM
It is listed in this lexicon of German first names:

http://www.vornamenlexikon.de/

A search of google.de will also reveal some Germans named Rachel. However, it seems to be true that outside of English speaking countries, this name always indicates Jewish descent. Unlike e.g. Margareta and Sara.

Zyklop
Saturday, April 1st, 2006, 11:28 AM
It is listed in this lexicon of German first names:

http://www.vornamenlexikon.de/It´s a German lexicon of first names, not a lexicon of German first names. Do you see the difference?

nicholas
Saturday, April 1st, 2006, 11:44 AM
My old name meant "little King" it was Irish. Nicholas means "victorious people" and I think is Greek.

symmakhos
Saturday, April 1st, 2006, 11:46 AM
Zyklop: I understand your point, still I should say that the author of the lexicon considers these names to be in current usage in Germany - the site is directed towards German-speaking parents. But there is obviously an internationalist, maybe even Jewish, bias.

Siegfried
Saturday, April 1st, 2006, 01:02 PM
I have three first names, two of them Germanic, one Mediterranean of disputed origins; Romance, Etruscan, or Hellenic.

Theudiskaz
Saturday, April 1st, 2006, 03:12 PM
You know, this rabid anti-Jewish thing is getting pretty tiresome. Find something positive to work on.


Call it what you want, we value our own people and our own culture, our own names, more than that of the Jews. Is this so awful? We just want a civilization of our own. In addition to this Jews are the most rabid opponents of European nationalism and culture there are, more so than the Muslims. You can't blame Germanic preservationists for feeling hostility toward them.

RusViking
Saturday, April 1st, 2006, 04:22 PM
Call it what you want, we value our own people and our own culture, our own names, more than that of the Jews. Is this so awful? We just want a civilization of our own. In addition to this Jews are the most rabid opponents of European nationalism and culture there are, more so than the Muslims. You can't blame Germanic preservationists for feeling hostility toward them.
I don't disagree, but in all seriousness, please elaborate when you have time. I am not sure I get the European nationalism thing. It seems, to me...that the Europeans I meet here on Skadi and in America are much more anti-Semitic than Americans.

The thing is that I don't waste my energy on hostility. But then, maybe I am missing something on this Jewish question.

It is just hard for me to hate, number one, and two, to hate a whole group of people.

Northern Paladin
Saturday, April 1st, 2006, 10:55 PM
I have three first names, two of them Germanic, one Mediterranean of disputed origins; Romance, Etruscan, or Hellenic.

How is that so? Is this a dutch tradition or something?

Weg
Saturday, April 1st, 2006, 11:48 PM
Well, I beat you Siegfried. I've four first names... and only use one.

Northern Paladin
Sunday, April 2nd, 2006, 12:17 AM
I think most European names are "Christian" in one way or another, either Biblical or derived from some saint or other -- no matter if they are Germanic, Semitic, Slavic, Celtic, Greek, or Latin.

At the time my parents were born it was common in Sweden to give children old Norse names, such as Gunnar, Tore, Ulf, Siv; but unfortunately those names sound very goofy and unfashionable to most people nowadays.

Yes many Hebrew names have been popularized in Europe because of Christianity.

Swedish names seem to be getting more Anglocized. I swear half of all Swedish girls are named Sanna or Malin. :D


"Rachel" as a name isnt used in Germany. It hasnt anything to do with Antijudaism, its just a fact that this name is definately not German.

Germans use Hebrew names but different ones.

Georgia
Sunday, April 2nd, 2006, 04:36 AM
My name is Monika Gertrud.

I am not sure why my parents chose the name Monika for me. I do know why I was named Gertrud. My Papa's only sister's name was Gertrud.

I believe Monika means femine and/or advisor. I am not sure if this is a Germanic name or not. Perhaps Greek?

Gertrud means strong spear. This is an old Germanic name.

Nordraserei
Sunday, April 2nd, 2006, 04:38 AM
My name is Monika Gertrud.

I am not sure why my parents chose the name Monika for me. I do know why I was named Gertrud. My Papa's only sister's name was Gertrud.

I believe Monika means femine and/or advisor. I am not sure if this is a Germanic name or not. Perhaps Greek?

Gertrud means strong spear. This is an old Germanic name.
I don't like the name Monika either. I'd never name my daughter that.

Dr. Solar Wolff
Sunday, April 2nd, 2006, 04:49 AM
My name is Viviane,
and it means:
The Lady of the Lake and/or living, lively
Originally from Arthurian-Legend

Isn't the Lady of the Lake some sort of Celtic water spirt?

Georgia
Sunday, April 2nd, 2006, 04:53 AM
I don't like the name Monika either. I'd never name my daughter that.



I am sure my parents Kurt Otto und Hildegard had a good reason why they liked this name and named their first-born Monika Gertrud. And that is certainly good enough for me:) .

I personally like names such as Sarah, Elizabeth, Hannah, Dixie, Georgia, Anneliese, Irmgard, Hildegard. As a matter of fact, my husband and I chose two of those names for our daughter.

Siegmund
Sunday, April 2nd, 2006, 05:09 AM
I don't like the name Monika either.
To me it has a very strong tone to it, which I like very much. One source (http://anonym.to/?http://www.vornamenlexikon.de/mm-vornamen.htm) gives its meaning as the "singular one" in Greek.

Dr. Solar Wolff
Sunday, April 2nd, 2006, 05:13 AM
My first name is Henry. This is an English name as far as I know but in looking it up it is referred to the root meaning Heim Reich or home rule or ruler of the household or something like this. This may mean it is an old Anglo-Saxon name. I have noticed some people named Heinrich are called Henri or even Heini so my name may have originally been a dimunitive of something like Heinrich in Anglo-Saxon.

Theudiskaz
Sunday, April 2nd, 2006, 06:57 AM
As far as I know, no version of Henry was used by the Anglo-Saxons. If it was it would have been "Hamric" or maybe "Hanric". The diminutive would have probably been something like "Hama". So it wouldn't have been used in England till at least as late as the Norman Conquest.

RusViking
Sunday, April 2nd, 2006, 03:34 PM
My first name is Henry. This is an English name as far as I know but in looking it up it is referred to the root meaning Heim Reich or home rule or ruler of the household or something like this. This may mean it is an old Anglo-Saxon name. I have noticed some people named Heinrich are called Henri or even Heini so my name may have originally been a dimunitive of something like Heinrich in Anglo-Saxon.

My father's name is Henry:

http://www.behindthename.com/php/search.php?nmd=n&terms=henry&submit=Go

Dr. Solar Wolff
Monday, April 3rd, 2006, 05:52 AM
My father's name is Henry:

http://www.behindthename.com/php/search.php?nmd=n&terms=henry&submit=Go

Thanks RusViking. According to the link it is of Norman origin which is so much better than the Anglo-Saxon rif-raf.

Siegfried
Monday, April 3rd, 2006, 08:00 AM
How is that so? Is this a dutch tradition or something?

Since Weg just mentioned he has four first names, I think it's also a tradition in other European regions. Here in the Netherlands, at least, it's a Christian tradition to give your child multiple names for the baptism. Only one of them (or a shortened form of one of them, or even a completely different one) is actually used in day-to-day life.

Chlodovech
Monday, April 3rd, 2006, 03:26 PM
Here in the Netherlands, at least, it's a Christian tradition to give your child multiple names for the baptism.


Yeah, my second and third name are derived from evangelic writers. :)

Pro-Alpine
Friday, October 27th, 2006, 10:36 PM
mine is Józsua. Some biblical name.

Kurtz
Friday, October 27th, 2006, 10:43 PM
Mine is Étienne. 98% of all Skadites are unable to pronunce it. Way too French for you guys :)

It comes from Greek and means crowned

Patrioten
Friday, October 27th, 2006, 10:54 PM
My

Æmeric
Friday, October 27th, 2006, 11:12 PM
Mine is Étienne. 98% of all Skadites are unable to pronunce it. Way too French for you guys :)

It comes from Greek and means crowned

I can pronounce it. It's a local surname in my area, courtesy of mid-19th century immigrants from the province of Luxembourg, Belgium. It's a French form of Stephen.

My first name is Germanic coming to England by way of France. My middle name is also Germanic, one that has been quite popular with royals over the centuries. My surname is Welsh.

Æmeric
Saturday, October 28th, 2006, 04:28 AM
My name is Zachary. Very much in the Anglo-American tradition. Sadly that's about as Hebrew a name as I could have possibly been given. Thanks Mom and Dad, you twits.

So your name is Zachary Smith. Did your parents name you after the popular character from "Lost in Space"?:bowlaugh

Theudiskaz
Saturday, October 28th, 2006, 04:33 AM
Hehe, you don't know how many times I've heard that.;)

Oswiu
Saturday, October 28th, 2006, 05:53 PM
My full name is
:jude:hillbilly:ignome

Dad is
:jude:ignome

Mum is
:fvenus: :suttonho

My kids will be
:suttonho :valkyrie :clover

;)

California Love
Sunday, October 29th, 2006, 01:40 AM
My first name is biblical and Irish, my middle name, which I dont use, is popular just about anywhere in Europe, and its biblical, and my last name is German (as is my mothers maiden name).

Oswiu
Sunday, October 29th, 2006, 01:57 AM
My first name is biblical and Irish, my middle name, which I dont use, is popular just about anywhere in Europe, and its biblical, and my last name is German (as is my mothers maiden name).
Sean Joseph Finkelstein?
Seamus Michael Fischgesicht?
:shrug

California Love
Sunday, October 29th, 2006, 01:59 AM
Sean Joseph Finkelstein?
Seamus Michael Fischgesicht?
:shrug
Hhahaha...even though we dont get along, I really love your posts sometimes. :thumbup

Fischgesicht= fish face, ja? :D

Anyway, no, my name isnt that long, nor complicated looking, and my last name is not that funny sounding. (too bad) :D

SineNomine
Sunday, October 29th, 2006, 02:07 AM
Mine is Latin (and I do have one, contrary to what my screen name implies).

California Love
Sunday, October 29th, 2006, 02:13 AM
My full name is
:jude:hillbilly:ignome
David Jethro McFadden?

Oswiu
Sunday, October 29th, 2006, 02:19 AM
David Jethro McFadden?
Mick Jacob Stein?

California Love
Sunday, October 29th, 2006, 02:35 AM
Mick Jacob Stein?
Benny Jeb O'Maley?

Oswiu
Sunday, October 29th, 2006, 02:37 AM
Benny Jeb O'Maley?
My word! It must have been a billion to one, and yet you get every single component spot on! :-O :-O :-O

California Love
Sunday, October 29th, 2006, 02:53 AM
My word! It must have been a billion to one, and yet you get every single component spot on! :-O :-O :-O
Yeeeeeears of practice.;)

Also, I love how how you talk (type?), its looks so "English" and I always think I'm chatting with Stewie from Family guy.


(If you havnt seen the show, hes a genocidal, brilliant baby with a 19th century English accent) :D

Kurtz
Friday, December 14th, 2007, 11:26 PM
The title says it all. Germanic, Latin, Biblical, Greek or other? The huge majority of traditional European names come from these sources, AFAIK.

Soldier of Wodann
Friday, December 14th, 2007, 11:28 PM
Anglo-Saxon.

Blood_Axis
Friday, December 14th, 2007, 11:29 PM
2? :eek: Now I wonder who else has a greek name :D

Come to think of it. All of my immediate family has ancient greek names, except for my brother who has a germanic one. :p

Freydis
Friday, December 14th, 2007, 11:37 PM
Germanic in origin.

Jäger
Friday, December 14th, 2007, 11:37 PM
Aramaic. :)

ÆinvargR
Friday, December 14th, 2007, 11:38 PM
Latin. As is the form of my surname, I believe. I want to change my first name to a nowadays common, Germanic name, which also is easier to pronounce together with my surname. But my parents kind of take it as an insult and they also think only someone who doesn't want to be recognized does that, "it's not normal". I don't want to do that to them, so I'm doubting, though still considering.

Geribeetus
Friday, December 14th, 2007, 11:45 PM
The boy's name Gerald \ge-ra-ld\ is pronounced JARE-ald. It is of Old German origin, and its meaning is "spear ruler".

Kadu
Friday, December 14th, 2007, 11:45 PM
Anglo-Saxon/Germanic, very English.

mischak
Friday, December 14th, 2007, 11:45 PM
Mine is English, coming from Old English, so Germanic I guess

The Horned God
Saturday, December 15th, 2007, 12:07 AM
Gaelic.

Loyalist
Saturday, December 15th, 2007, 02:10 AM
Germanic; stereotypically English/British.

stormlord
Saturday, December 15th, 2007, 02:22 AM
Germanic forename

Fairly rare Afrikaner surname of obscure origins

The Lawspeaker
Saturday, December 15th, 2007, 02:25 AM
My given name is Tristan (the Breton way), and is derived from the Celtic name Trystan and it have it's origins in the Pictish name Drostan.
Another source indicates that it may have it's origins in the Celtic name Drystan that in turn may have it's origins in the word drest which means "riot" or "tumult". The association with the Latin word tristis or the French word triste (both meaning sad) is disputed.

Middangeard
Saturday, December 15th, 2007, 03:57 AM
I chose Greek, then noticed there was a Biblical option. I see them as one and the same, so I'd consider my name in origin to be greek.

Timothy
From the Greek name Τιμοθεος (Timotheos) meaning "honouring God", derived from τιμαω (timao) "to honour" and θεος (theos) "god".

Interestingly (though the reasoning behind it is unknown to me - myself being estranged from my Father who conceived the idea) myself and all my sibling's names follow the same syllabic and etymological pattern. The first name is Greek contains 3 syllables and the middle is Gaelic contains 2.
My full name is:
Timothy Ramsay Fagan
and as an example, my brother's is:
Gregory Finlay Fagan

ladybright
Saturday, December 15th, 2007, 03:59 AM
Scandanavian. My parents expected me to be a stand up kind of person, maybe even a ruler.;) My middle name is Old English.

Kurtz
Saturday, December 15th, 2007, 06:05 AM
Mine is the Frenchized version of Stephen, which is comes from Στέφανος, so (ancient) Greek. It means "crowned", not in the monarchic sense, but crowned as were the winners of a competition, athletic for example.

mischak
Saturday, December 15th, 2007, 06:21 AM
Here is a good site for people to use if they're not sure of the origin of their name.

http://www.ancestry.com/facts/-name-meaning.ashx?fn=&yr=1890

Kadu
Saturday, December 15th, 2007, 06:29 AM
I knew the site already but thanks anyway

My first forename is originally from a Germanic word and means “free man”, my second forename is an Old English personal name composed of the elements ead prosperity, riches, fortune + weard guard. It was one of the most successful of all Old English names, surviving from before the Conquest to the present day, and even being exported into other European languages. It was the name of three Anglo-Saxon kings and has been borne by eight kings of England since the Norman Conquest.

Gefjon
Saturday, December 15th, 2007, 06:38 AM
Mine's Germanic and has a sorta funny story. ;)

HERTHA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German

Pronounced: HER-tah
Form of NERTHUS. The spelling change from N to H resulted from a misreading of Tacitus's text.


My other name comes from Latin/Greek. ;)

ANGELA :D

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Italian, German, Romanian, Slovene, Russian

Other Scripts: Ангела (Russian)

Pronounced: AN-jel-a (English), ahn-JEL-ah (Italian)
Feminine form of Angelus (see ANGEL).

Lyfing
Saturday, December 15th, 2007, 06:45 AM
My forename is Thomas. I was named after my mother's father. I read somewhere that that is Aramaic for twin. I'm a Gemini so that actually makes sense. And my sun rises in Leo ( "tomcat" ) so that makes sense as well.

It's too bad Christianity ever came about and I am named such, but it is my name and it sounds sweet to me.

Later,

-Lyfing

Taurin
Saturday, December 15th, 2007, 04:38 PM
Mine is of Germanic origin. The root is the same as Kadu's first one - if I guess correctly, as I think.

Taras Bulba
Sunday, December 16th, 2007, 12:13 AM
My name is Greek in origins.

ChaosLord
Sunday, December 16th, 2007, 07:18 AM
My first name comes from the biblical era.

Taurin
Sunday, December 16th, 2007, 11:46 PM
Pronounced: AN-jel-a (English), ahn-JEL-ah (Italian)
Feminine form of Angelus (see ANGEL).

It should be rather pronounced AHN-jel-ah, stressed on the first syllable in Italian too.

Ælfhere
Sunday, December 16th, 2007, 11:51 PM
Mine has Biblical origins, meaning "twin".

Drakkar
Sunday, December 16th, 2007, 11:58 PM
Scandinavian, Swedish sp., means "powerful ruler" :D

sophia
Monday, December 17th, 2007, 12:43 AM
Pretty sure it's Greek, its also in the Bible.

Brynhild
Monday, December 17th, 2007, 01:44 AM
My first name is Welsh and derived from Guinevere - meaning white phantom or ghost.

My middle name (I laughed at this) is Latin and meaning Patrician - upper class or noble. I have noble attributes, but I definitely don't have the money that it would suggest! :D

Thusnelda
Monday, December 17th, 2007, 06:47 PM
Mine, Julia, is of Latin origin.

"The girl's name Julia \j(u)-lia\ is pronounced joo-lee-AH, zhoo-lee-AH. It is of Latin origin, and its meaning is "youthful; Jove's child". Feminine form of Julius. Used among the early Christians, but rare in the Middle Ages"

Oswiu
Monday, December 17th, 2007, 09:04 PM
Forenamewise, I'm a Hebrew. Son of a Hebrew, of a Hellenised Hebrew, of an Aramaean (i.e. a fashion-conscious Hebrew) ...

I intend to be the last Semitically named in my line!

Æmeric
Monday, December 17th, 2007, 09:10 PM
Germanic but Gallicized then brought to England by the Normans where it received a proper English polishing.:)

Middle name is also uber-Germanic, born by many Kings. Surname is Welsh but it has been many generations since someone in my paternal line has married anyone but an Anglo-Saxon or in my fathers case a Anglo-German.

Deary
Sunday, December 23rd, 2007, 09:33 PM
Kathryn is the English/American spelling of the name Katherine, said to come from the Greek Αικατερίνη (Aikaterine). The meaning "pure" comes from the Greek word καθαρος (katharos). Many saints and women of royalty shared my name. A lot of them were wives of plenty King Henrys :D

Evolved
Sunday, December 23rd, 2007, 10:43 PM
Hebrew origin, but very common among gentiles throughout the Anglosphere. I don't think my name suits me at all. :p

This site has a lot of information about given names: http://www.behindthename.com/

Fafner
Sunday, December 23rd, 2007, 11:14 PM
Mine is in Old English (An Anglo-Saxon/Germanic root). It's EDGAR. It means something as "the defender with the spear" or "spear ruler". "Gar" means spear, so names like Gary, Edward, Gerard, etc. has a meaning with spear.

My second name is purely Latin. OCTAVIO, wich is the Spanish version of Latin name Octaevius. It means the Eighth.

:)

Matamoros
Monday, December 24th, 2007, 05:38 AM
My first forename is originally from a Germanic word and means “free man”,


Mine is of Germanic origin. The root is the same as Kadu's first one - if I guess correctly, as I think.

I think I share the same first name as you two. Our name, or a local variant of it, is common throughout much of the Germanic world.

Siebenbürgerin
Thursday, March 20th, 2008, 12:17 PM
My Forename, Alina is a Name that many Countries use. I read it is of Dutch Origin.

The name Alina is a baby girl name. The name Alina comes from the Dutch origin. In Dutch The meaning of the name Alina is: Alone.

But not everyone agrees. Here's Information from some Sites I looked at:


ALINA (2)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, Italian, Polish, Romanian

Pronounced: ah-LEE-nah (German, Italian, Polish)
Pet form of ADELINA and names that end in alina.

---

Categories:

Scottish, British, American, English, Russian

Used in:

English speaking countries

Additional info:

Of uncertain origin. It may be from an Arabic word for 'noble' or, in Scotland, a feminine form of Alistair.

It could also be a form of Adelaide.

---

The girl's name Alina \a-li-na\ is of Greek origin, and its meaning is "light". Slavic variant of Helen. Also variant of Aline, nickname of Adelina, or may derive from Arabic for "noble, illustrious". In Scotland, the name has been used as a feminine form of Alistair.

---

Of uncertain origin. It may be from an Arabic word for 'noble' or, in Scotland, a feminine form of Alistair.

It could also be a form of Adelaide.

---

Dutch Origin makes Sense for me because the first Germanic Settlers in Transylvania where I live were of Flemish Blood.

Bärin
Saturday, May 17th, 2008, 08:52 PM
Other. Russian. :)

Name: Katja
Russian Meaning: pure
Gender: girl
Origin/Nationality: Russia
Continent/Source: Europe and Russia

Edit:
Aaaargh! It's a Russian diminuitive of a Russian adaption of a GREEEEEEEEEEEK name! Argh! Correct your post IMMEDIATELY, Katyusha!
Ok. :D

From the Greek name Αικατερινη (Aikaterine). The etymology is debated: it could derive from the earlier Greek name ‘Εκατερινη (Hekaterine), which came from ‘εκατερος (hekateros) "each of the two"; it could derive from the name of the goddess HECATE; it could be related to Greek αικια (aikia) "torture"; or it could be from a Coptic name meaning "my consecration of your name". The Romans associated it with Greek καθαρος (katharos) "pure" and changed their spelling from Katerina to Katharina to reflect this.

The name belonged to a 4th-century saint and martyr from Alexandria who was tortured on the famous Catherine wheel. Another saint by this name was Catherine of Siena, a 14th-century mystic. This name was also borne by two empresses of Russia, including Catherine the Great, and by three of Henry VIII's wives.

http://www.behindthename.com/name/katherine

But my name isn't Katherine, it's Katja. ;) I always considered my name Russian originated, because my parents named all of us in the family with Russian inspiration.

Schmetterling
Saturday, May 17th, 2008, 09:14 PM
Mine is Germanic.

Edda
Scandinavian girls name which comes from mythology.

My parents were fascinated with Norse mythology at the time so they gave me and my sister mythological names. This got some kids to poke fun at us in the USA for having "weird" names, but it could always have been worse. I could have been a boy called Aethilbertus or Eggburt, as we were discussing in the Shoutbox yesterday. :D

Deary
Saturday, May 17th, 2008, 09:18 PM
Other. Russian. :)

Name: Katja
Russian Meaning: pure
Gender: girl
Origin/Nationality: Russia
Continent/Source: Europe and Russia

Edit:
Ok. :D

....

But my name isn't Katherine, it's Katja. ;) I always considered my name Russian originated, because my parents named all of us in the family with Russian inspiration.

Katja is Russian, but is just a pet form or sort of nickname for Ekaterina/Yekaterina (Katherine) which ultimately stems from Aikaterine or Katharos from Greek, like you just found out while I was writing :p When I was in Russia people would call me Katka, Katya, Katenka or Katusha depending on their level of association with me. A lot of other names do this in Russian too, I believe. Maybe Oswiu could shed some light on when it is appropriate to use Katya because I have forgotten the exact reasons for the variations. Anyway, most Kat- names all trace back to Greek :)

Oswiu
Saturday, May 17th, 2008, 10:22 PM
Edit: Ok. :D
:p

The name belonged to a 4th-century saint ...
I can't believe they missed out the lovely Екатерина Гусева;
http://www.petershop.com/data/i-cat/auth-1228-labelX.jpghttp://teleweek.ru/pictures/1560/picture.jpg
http://www.elle.ru/images/docs/i/3851.jpg:D


But my name isn't Katherine, it's Katja. ;) I always considered my name Russian originated, because my parents named all of us in the family with Russian inspiration.
Odd, was that common in the DDR? Funnily enough, there's been a bit of a tradition here in England, but amongst the upper classes, for giving Russian diminuitive names to their kids: Natasha and the like. I always wondered if they'd taken them out of Tolstoy!

..it could always have been worse. I could have been a boy called Aethilbertus or Eggburt, as we were discussing in the Shoutbox yesterday. :D
I'm considering close variants of the above for my sons... ;)

Maybe Oswiu could shed some light on when it is appropriate to use Katya because I have forgotten the exact reasons for the variations.
There's no strict rules for it, though generally speaking the longer they are the cuter they sound, the more like baby-talk. Russians love to do this. Hilarious what they do to my forename!
Order of formality > intimacy =
Yekaterina + Patronymic e.g. "Yekaterina Vyacheslavovna"- for formal aquaintances, teachers, superiors and strangers.
Katya, Kat' - for casual talk between friends and relatives,
Katyusha, Katyushenka etc. - for comic effect, emotional reassurance, comfort and, um, more interesting situations... :D
We'll have to chat about your Russkie adventures, Deary Dorogaya!

Bärin
Saturday, May 17th, 2008, 10:27 PM
Odd, was that common in the DDR? Funnily enough, there's been a bit of a tradition here in England, but amongst the upper classes, for giving Russian diminuitive names to their kids: Natasha and the like. I always wondered if they'd taken them out of Tolstoy!
I don't know, more or less. We East Germans were friends with the USSR, so some families liked to give their children Russian names. We have a famous East German girl named Katarina. ;)

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2286/1496334049_aee0761c46.jpg

Our East German leader named his daughter Sonja, which is also a Russian diminutive, I think.

Sonja
Gender: Girl Name
Origin: Russian
Name Meaning: Meaning "wise."

Oswiu
Saturday, May 17th, 2008, 10:43 PM
Our East German leader named his daughter Sonja, which is also a Russian diminutive, I think.
Yep, of Greek Sophia.

Mazorquero
Sunday, May 18th, 2008, 12:04 AM
Pure Latin origin. My name is "Salsa Mambo", very Latino... just kidding. It's true that my name is purely Latin in origin, let's say I consider myself a son of Mars: César Augusto, the first Roman emperor. Fortunately no one in my closest family has any Biblical name, my brother has explained his, my father has a Latin and a Germanic name and my mother a Latin and a Greek name.

Hersir
Sunday, May 18th, 2008, 07:45 AM
All the names in my family are old norse names:) Im glad my father didnt get his way with my name; He wanted to call me Kristian...

mischak
Sunday, May 18th, 2008, 08:07 AM
Germanic. Not ever telling it, though. ;)

Three of my siblings have Germanic names, the other two are Biblical. (Yes, I have 5 siblings)

Flash Voyager
Sunday, May 18th, 2008, 08:10 AM
Greek.

Phlegethon
Sunday, May 18th, 2008, 08:13 AM
I don't know, more or less. We East Germans were friends with the USSR, so some families liked to give their children Russian names.

Russian like Cindy, Mandy, Nancy, Mario, Silvio, Adriano, Gordon, Sandro, Tino, Enrico and the like? There are a whole lot more of them than of Iljas and Nadeshdas.

Alice
Sunday, May 18th, 2008, 08:15 AM
Biblical. From the Old Testament, more specifically. ;)

Bärin
Sunday, May 18th, 2008, 08:18 AM
Russian like Cindy, Mandy, Nancy, Mario, Silvio, Adriano, Gordon, Sandro, Tino, Enrico and the like? There are a whole lot more of them than of Iljas and Nadeshdas.
You always have to be a Besserwisser, don't you? :o

No. I have 6 siblings and I won't list all their names, but you have two examples, Russian like Ivan and Alla. Cindy, Mandy, Nancy are names they give to children in the USA. Last time I checked, I'm from Germany. ;)

Phlegethon
Sunday, May 18th, 2008, 08:28 AM
Well, almost everyone from the former GDR until his mid-30s seems to have one of those names I posted. Especially those of lower social calibre. And I am probably more familiar with the GDR because I already lived when it actually existed. Parts of my paternal and maternal family lived there (in the Eichsfeld, the only solidly Catholic enclave in a country of soulless red agnostics).

Bärin
Sunday, May 18th, 2008, 08:35 AM
Well, almost everyone from the former GDR until his mid-30s seems to have one of those names I posted. Especially those of lower social calibre. And I am probably more familiar with the GDR because I already lived when it actually existed. Parts of my paternal and maternal family lived there (in the Eichsfeld, the only solidly Catholic enclave in a country of soulless red agnostics).
I may be the youngest in my family, but my family is all from the DDR and my parents and some of my siblings were very much alive and familiar with the DDR, more than you will ever be. ;) If you think almost everyone in East Germany was named Cindy, Mandy and Nancy then you're very misinformed. ;)

Ossi
Sunday, May 18th, 2008, 08:52 AM
LOL. More nonsense about my former country. No one in my family or in the families I know bears any of these names.

Anyway, back to topic. My forename is Biblical. It's a form of JOHANNES and exists in Dutch, Scandinavian, Czech, Polish, Slovene, German. My parents didn't name me for Biblical reasons though, they named me after Johannes Becher (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johannes_R._Becher).

Rik
Sunday, May 18th, 2008, 09:34 AM
My name is Rik , it's Celtic/Germanic in origin. It means ruler/rich/power. Many Germanic and Celtic kings have got the name in one version or another (Rik/Rix/Ric/Rich/Rek/etc..) ,
often combined with another word
(Ala-rik , Liede-rik , Ric-hard , Vercingeto-rix,Ambio-rix, etc... ) .
Rig , the nickname of the god Heimdall, is also closely related with my name
My last name means the same as my first name , the only difference is that my first name is Celtogermanic in origin , while my last is Germanic.
An older version of my complete name can even be read in the Rigsthula (Rig Kon Ungr , Dutchify that name and you will know my real name).

Oswiu
Sunday, May 18th, 2008, 09:00 PM
Dutchify that name and you will know my real name).
Gods, Rik! Don't make it too easy! The Mossad guys enjoy this thread; it's a bit like getting paid and being awarded medals for sitting and doing crosswords all day. Don't ruin their fun! :p

By the way, I'm thinking of naming my eldest AEthelfrith. Do you think he'll get bullied at school? What might they call him?
Should I give him a name that will allow him to fit in more, like, oh, let's say Jihad-Mbongo-Zbigniew?

Schmetterling
Sunday, May 18th, 2008, 09:01 PM
It's only forenames... It's true though, there aren't many running around with this forename of mine. Ah well, let the Mossad come and get me if they have a problem with me. :p

Thrymheim
Sunday, May 18th, 2008, 09:18 PM
Right there's disagreement on mine some say it is a female version of the Hebrew name meaning "God heard" with the Greek for flower tacked on the end.
others that it is Aramaic and means listener, whatever it's a new(ish) name arising in the latter part of the 18th century.

And my middle name is the Latin form of the Hebrew name Hannah (meaning favour or grace) I have the French spelling of the name.

my surname is possibly Celtic or Germanic; Son of the famous spear.

Jäger
Sunday, May 18th, 2008, 10:42 PM
No one in my family or in the families I know bears any of these names.
When I served in the BW I met 3 Marios and 2 Tinos all from the former GDR, right now I know 3 Cindys, all from the former GDR, I actually had to laugh loud when Phleg listed these names, it simply does feel true with my experiences. :D