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borreby.
Sunday, December 16th, 2018, 05:59 AM
Hello all, I'm new to the forum and to physical anthropology as well, so I have a few questions that might seem stupid to those who are more experienced than myself. For those who can provide very straightforward, clear answers with explanations I'd be really really grateful :)
My questions are all about the Borreby type specifically, and their relationship with the classic Nordic types, Halstatt and tronder.

1. Should a borreby reproduce with a tronder type?
2. Are borrebys and other cro-magnid types considered Germanic / Scandinavian / Nordic or Nordish?
3. As a borreby with primarily Norwegian and Danish ancestry, but a small amount of french and scottish admixture, can I can myself any of the things mentioned in question two?

Şoreiğar
Sunday, December 16th, 2018, 10:08 AM
1. Should a borreby reproduce with a tronder type?Yes, definitely. And with Hallstatts, as well as with Keltic-Nordids, Brünns and Faelids. The more the merrier.


2. Are borrebys and other cro-magnid types considered Germanic / Scandinavian / Nordic or Nordish?Yes.


3. As a borreby with primarily Norwegian and Danish ancestry, but a small amount of french and scottish admixture, can I can myself any of the things mentioned in question two?What you can call yourself, depends a lot on subjective opinion and context. If you've never lived in Scandinavia, and don't know the language, I would find it odd to refer to you as 'Scandinavian'. But in an American context, such labelling seem more relaxed and flexibly used, and refer more to a person's ancestry than their actual place of origin. For example, a sixth generation American in New York with predominantly Italian ancestry, will still get called 'Italian', even though he doesn't know the language and has never seen his original homeland.

'Germanic' is a bit of a broader ancestral and cultural term, which you definitely qualify for.

'Nordish' is largely a phenotypical characterization, meaning 'someone who has North-European physical traits'. Since you're Borreby, then yes.

'Nordic', again, it depends on the context. In an American colloquial sense, yes. In a European sense, probably not. Maybe if you came and lived her for a decade or two.