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Siebenbürgerin
Friday, October 12th, 2018, 11:33 PM
I've the idea from the folk costumes thread. I've an interest in headcoverings like veils, bonnets, wimples, hennins, kerchiefs, gable hoods, or even hats and caps worn by Germanic women throughout history. Not only religious but also parts of folk costumes, for holidays or peasant dress.

Until the latter 20th century, headscarves were commonly worn by women in many parts of the Europe and the Americas, as well as some other parts of the world. In recent decades, headscarves, like hats, have fallen out of favor in Western culture. Until at least the 18th century, the wearing of a headcovering for the hair was regarded as customary for Christian women to agree with contemporary notions of modesty and as an indication of married status; the "matron's cap" is a general term for these. Nuns cover their heads because it is written in the Bible they must be covered while prophesising. In fact, Christian women were first to cover their hair. Muslims were influenced by Byzantine Christians. In early 700, Orthodox Christian women wore head coverings in accordance with the Apostle Paul's command in 1st Corinthians for women to cover their heads in worship.

Some examples of headwear from nowadays and other religious traditions:

Amish

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/23/5c/17/235c17b88b7bb7a6b8f4fe01f5d7a712.jpg

Amish Woman's Covering Cap Kapp Bonnet with strings

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/bd/05/96/bd05964898fad776ca1d5b62fbe38a02.jpg

Amish volunteers

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/e8/d6/41/e8d641e45df29a3518837d8fd10b930c.jpg

Mennonite Woman

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/64/77/00/647700429d37c4183386046302312f3c.jpg

German Baptist Brethren Woman

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/4b/ea/64/4bea6406cdc9a3cd5eee4d88a843f1a4.jpg

17th Century Village at Plimoth Plantation - Plymouth, Massachusetts

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/11/7a/65/117a65035a4861766d43fd2c9d1584ae.jpg

Puritan

https://s.yimg.com/ny/api/res/1.2/ISMwt0ijohKxoRaNLtju9w--~A/YXBwaWQ9aGlnaGxhbmRlcjtzbT0xO3c9ODAw/http://media.zenfs.com/en-US/homerun/nymag_com_989/61c28f81a12f26c0719bdb7bc2e6b714

Early Quaker

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-OhNzQW7QOIc/VAI7aJdepRI/AAAAAAAABwk/l0L1fMkz-jc/s1600/Honor%2Bweb%2Bfriendly.jpg

Quaker

https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-xkNDOauoK2k/WsfjXLidg3I/AAAAAAAAI4Y/zdAfoM2s3Mc4A58oDmSIY4PlciBE286MQCLcBGAs/s1600/Turning%2Bthe%2BTide.jpg

Shaker

https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71Dr0r5iSPL.jpg

https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71-np4L-wPL.jpg

Hutterite

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/52/1c/40/521c40b12ce2937ad69dced1ffab0525.jpg

Bruderhof

https://scontent-atl3-1.cdninstagram.com/vp/42c62a30585900f4c82161c2dede7267/5C4B0BD0/t51.2885-15/e35/41299267_243376439642931_130833187768360 6370_n.jpg

Aelfgar
Saturday, October 13th, 2018, 12:09 AM
https://www.shelaghlewins.com/reenactment/saxon_womans_outfit/saxon_womans_outfit.htm

A Reconstructed Saxon Woman's Outfit

https://www.shelaghlewins.com/reenactment/saxon_womans_outfit/dress.jpg

That would now be regarded by many as almost as unacceptable as Islamic dress. The past is a different country.

Siebenbürgerin
Saturday, October 13th, 2018, 12:20 AM
A wimple (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wimple) is an ancient form of female headdress, formed of a large piece of cloth worn around the neck and chin, and covering the top of the head. Its use developed in early medieval Europe. At many stages of medieval Christian culture it was unseemly for a married woman to show her hair. A wimple might be elaborately starched, and creased and folded in prescribed ways, and later elaborated versions were supported on wire or wicker framing, such as the cornette. Today the wimple is worn by certain nuns who retain a traditional habit.

A wimple as shown in Portrait of a Woman, circa 1430-1435, by Robert Campin (1375/1379–1444), National Gallery, London. The cloth is 4-ply and the pins holding it in place are visible at the top of the head

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/3/33/RCampin.jpg/440px-RCampin.jpg

Portrait of a Young Woman (or Lady Wearing a Gauze Headdress), 1435–1440 by the Netherlandish artist Rogier van der Weyden.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/98/Rogier_van_der_Weyden_-_Portrait_of_a_Woman_with_a_Winged_Bonne t_-_Google_Art_Project.jpg/600px-Rogier_van_der_Weyden_-_Portrait_of_a_Woman_with_a_Winged_Bonne t_-_Google_Art_Project.jpg

Portrait of a Lady (or Portrait of a Woman), same painter

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Rogier_van_der_Weyden_-_Portrait_of_a_Lady_-_Google_Art_Project.jpg/580px-Rogier_van_der_Weyden_-_Portrait_of_a_Lady_-_Google_Art_Project.jpg

Revival clothing

http://www.revivalclothing.com/ProductImages/wimple_hero.jpg

http://www.revivalclothing.com/ProductImages/wimpleveilpins.jpg

Veil and wimple

http://historicenterprises.com/images/196_large.jpg

Siebenbürgerin
Saturday, October 13th, 2018, 12:27 AM
Viking women also wore some type of head covering.

https://ciarsstitchintime.files.wordpress.com/2015/05/wpid-wp-1431926223166-e1431927235174.jpeg

https://i.pinimg.com/236x/b7/ee/46/b7ee46e56901170bd5683e254e02592c.jpg

https://i.pinimg.com/originals/ea/5c/25/ea5c25e7033205d6691f36332e66693f.jpg

https://i.pinimg.com/originals/40/1a/3c/401a3c80da42e823d0351224e90eb835.jpg

https://i.pinimg.com/736x/a5/6e/85/a56e85c05fba95cd73ed2d36df462e55--viking-reenactment-viking-garb.jpg

https://i.pinimg.com/736x/f1/f6/04/f1f604369daf1805d0069bca46193e92.jpg

https://img1.etsystatic.com/189/1/12040312/il_340x270.1334872897_pqsz.jpg

Here a blog post detailing the infos on Viking age head coverings: https://ciarsstitchintime.wordpress.com/2013/10/24/viking-age-head-coverings/

Siebenbürgerin
Saturday, October 13th, 2018, 12:43 AM
https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-jqCRd873_7g/TtUhOZUlvaI/AAAAAAAAIwU/PzrzFrMUocs/s1600/corregg5.jpg

During medieval times it was difficult to imagine a person without headwear. Excluding the children, it was compulsory to wear head pieces whether they were men or women belonging to all ages. At that time headwears were not only decorative pieces but also played a part in defining people's etiquettes and elegancy, moreover it was a part of social standing of people in society.

We can say that the war for piece of land and supremacy had led to the emergency of headwears. Some coverings were used to protect the head from serious injuries which gradually enter into civilization. Since the beginning of medieval period, as medieval costumes headwears too were essential part of attire. Throughout the medieval history with the development in tailoring skill of people and technology, head covers too had gone through a great degree of changes.

During late medieval period, everyone in European country used to wear head pieces which in their modern avtar are equally famous among masses. It was allowed for Italian women to uncover their head while the women's of other countries cover their head with wimple, barbet and fillet.

Fillet, a narrow head band was worn by unmarried women and by certain monks along with a wimple, it was a garment which underpass through chin to give support to linen cap or coif and a veil.

https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-YCnYwND_vKM/TtU9YQ1YE_I/AAAAAAAAIws/8ldoDvB8rxE/s400/Marian%252520wimple.jpg

Another accessory crespines used to confine the hair from both side of head were generally made of wire or knitted mesh. During the same period, Italian women abolished the use of head wears with transparent head gauzes.

https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-mYgClWo36i8/TtU-SIfG_1I/AAAAAAAAIw0/er2OCwdQ6fE/s1600/da-vinci.jpg

In today's times wimples are more common among nuns who are still attached to traditional way of wearing caps. In the meanwhile it was allowed for men to keep their head uncover.

With the beginning of fifteenth century, an era of expensive and extravagant clothes started which were huge and voluminous in size and gracious in look. To enhance the overall look of attire head coverings too became stylish, lased with jewelries and feathers. Crespines too come in its developed form, now they were used to gather hair in head's back. At that time Hennin was the most expensive hair-dress styled in styled in cone or steeple shape. This hair-dress had wired frame which was covered by fabric and had an attached veil. As for men, vest and doublets were more common. Their tall crowned hats with or without brims displayed their status in society.

https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-EQo2wYAj154/TtU_SDIOqCI/AAAAAAAAIxE/FiDJtwnUhS8/s1600/1400s_Sibyl.jpg

Heartshaped Henin

https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-JioXaKM7grM/TtVmnJ97sZI/AAAAAAAAIxk/YWseX3vjv0Q/s1600/medieval+hennin.jpg

Another Heart-shaped Henin

https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-uuy0WCMxejc/TtVnZFNNOLI/AAAAAAAAIxs/VJcQs_aRbpk/s640/10woman.jpg

Truncated Henin

https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-VRmlmPp_RdI/TtVp2y1qMbI/AAAAAAAAIx0/083uoo-zwVk/s1600/368px-Hans_Holbein_Temple_Detail.jpg

Conical Henin

When the renaissance era rises, head-wears also came in its best form. They were now more elaborate and had finely detailed designs. Emergence of different styles of renaissance costumes in different part of Europe led to the designing of more elaborative headgears to match their dresses. Gabble hood, a headgear had
embroidered lappets was famous among English women.

https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-MjfHm8AtDSE/TtU_uhaAEkI/AAAAAAAAIxM/P0VvG0qNhjc/s1600/Gabble+Hood.jpg

Gabble Hood

French hood as the name suggest was famous in France. It was round in shape, worn over veil in back of head.

https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-PEwbIQZefhQ/TtVAvGQB3iI/AAAAAAAAIxU/Qx4s_b8kk_4/s400/coif.jpg

French Hood

Centrally parted hair was confined in veil.

https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-sqU3Kf4lvd8/TtVBIIwuMeI/AAAAAAAAIxc/AaX9Y1fJtTc/s640/La+velata+or+La+donna+velata+The+woman+w ith+the+veil+1514-15+Raphael.jpg

Men wore large hats and German Barrett was popular among them.http://www.historyandwomen.com/2011/11/hair-styles-of-medieval-period.html

Siebenbürgerin
Saturday, October 13th, 2018, 02:27 AM
Dutch cap (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dutch_cap) or Dutch bonnet is a style of woman's hat associated with the various traditional Dutch woman's costumes. Usually made of white cotton or lace, it is sometimes characterized by triangular flaps or wings that turn up on either side. It can resemble some styles of nurse's hat.

Dutch working girl (17th century) as portrayed by Johannes Vermeer

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/5a/Johannes_Vermeer_-_De_melkmeid.jpg/800px-Johannes_Vermeer_-_De_melkmeid.jpg

Volendam, North Holland, the Netherlands

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/bb/b1/06/bbb10641a9eb0598965049d22f50961f.jpg

Volendam. Philips postcard, photo by Maurits Binger, ca. 1911

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/49/43/be/4943be47afe418c404a5ae20d8f948bc.jpg

Zeeland

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/a0/fd/8d/a0fd8d2af3d0390fe60a43e3be810665.jpg

Licht festival 2017 in Amsterdam

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/91/35/ee/9135eebe870225c2b48225838211f74c.jpg

Eindhoven

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/ab/50/ed/ab50ed6f03861eac6fb94b3a8e338a24.jpg

NoordBrabant

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/52/e0/4f/52e04fb51f5053338bc46bf32d12ff3c.jpg

Frisian Head Dress

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/55/28/44/55284435d6ed381f0a5f7a4cb83bcad5.jpg

Friesland

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/d0/ee/67/d0ee67ac13a01fdaf22d99139eaaa2e2.jpg

Siebenbürgerin
Saturday, October 13th, 2018, 02:38 AM
Wilhelm Petersen “Junge Friesin”, 1938 ”

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/79/0c/49/790c49ab24b6d2b32c1c90c51d7494f0.jpg

Young Frisian woman in native dress

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/10/f6/4c/10f64ca463600e670450498162d5e6f7.jpg

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/d9/11/91/d9119193457abcd8fbacbd752dd5dacd.jpg

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/ce/ab/64/ceab64570e6d3784af7bc62466c1c25c.jpg

Friesian woman in traditional costume with the German cap

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/2d/f9/67/2df96713fda7b064fef0901d87751189.jpg

Friesland ca. 1780. Woman with "German cap" dressed for a funeral. Drawing by Jan Duyvetter.

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/cd/5d/dc/cd5ddc500e7b8097dee397fc6db276c3.jpg

18th century Frisian costume

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/05/78/12/0578121d49f31fd0862a6b9d7f9e6834.jpg

Frisian Tracht from the North Sea isle of Föhr

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/1c/23/21/1c2321bc014ac34ae4887696869660dc.jpg

Woman from Helgoland (German Archipelago in the North Sea)

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/a5/54/c9/a554c959ec14b33a7aa681a8b9b3438a.jpg

Astragoth
Saturday, October 13th, 2018, 02:45 AM
All women wore their hair covered. It dates back to the tradition of women covering their hair "lest they temp angels".
Only prostitutes wore their hair uncovered. Thats why if you caught a woman naked back in medieval times and she had only one towel
she'd cover her hair before she covered her body.

Siebenbürgerin
Saturday, October 13th, 2018, 03:29 AM
Vorarlberg Tracht

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/71/a6/0c/71a60c74342b97396de5e9c2a39a8998.jpg

Zillertal Tracht

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/ab/47/5f/ab475f59f695fba190544d7ef835aa54.jpg

Headgear from Schaumburg Lippe in Lower Saxony

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/7c/b5/29/7cb529e13836d7d118791c35673e84b9.jpg

Alsatian Costume

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/51/13/2e/51132e17d15fd51c090150f5b6ca66d4.jpg

Thuringia

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/37/8d/dd/378ddd156623313b7bed2537a96f9fc6.jpg

Transylvanian Saxon

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/5f/33/64/5f3364dc37e1413332a79276b7f5c1f9.jpg

Donauschwaben Bride

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/21/11/cb/2111cbbbc66f9aa4a7727f621581b085.jpg

Bregenzerwald

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/42/f0/0d/42f00d7971b6eba8c12b66875be182d6.jpg

Schwarzwälder Tracht

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/e9/cf/86/e9cf86ee9b1a68dd6d0b73332d7f4d8a.jpg

Silesia

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/72/97/7d/72977d4b63297a0e50658ce72aaed46f.jpg

Siebenbürgerin
Saturday, October 13th, 2018, 03:50 AM
Modern renditions of various costumes

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/cb/e9/d8/cbe9d8061e425a95caf11724f6ac15c7.jpg

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/3a/78/5e/3a785edfcfaa38bb732085ba17faeee8.jpg

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/62/fd/07/62fd07231ec38af15c7d0563816280a3.jpg

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/d9/87/ad/d987adc3392e7cd48a1ec317816f92d8.jpg

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/ab/c5/72/abc5725f1ab013251208317aa4b47fc7.jpg

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/21/f0/c2/21f0c2c3e3f9aadc544e7456be114a42.jpg

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/d2/6e/e1/d26ee18f4345131563783a85bc56cd58.jpg

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/2e/ae/c9/2eaec90582d5b5c9f70e8f4f5344017f.jpg

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/c0/49/e7/c049e71f21adb679bb069cf411191d13.jpg

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/c1/6b/d0/c16bd01b759009a7e7844dd7ef080b0c.jpg

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/9e/2b/43/9e2b436b78ea3c864f4fa7ae467a45c7.jpg

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/fe/50/56/fe505632c662b7024a4c55066d2efb2f.jpg

https://sebastian-wehrle.de//wp-content/gallery/portrait/Rollenkranz_I_Muehlenbach.jpg

https://sebastian-wehrle.de//wp-content/gallery/portrait/Schnotz_I_Hogschuer.jpg

Siebenbürgerin
Wednesday, October 24th, 2018, 12:41 AM
A little bit history about the bonnet (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bonnet_(headgear)), a common headpiece for Germanic women in the past:


Until the late 19th century bonnet seems to have been the preferred term for most types of hats worn by women, while "hat" was more reserved for male headgear, and female styles that resembled them, typically either in much smaller versions perched on top of the head, or versions with very wide brims all the way round. In the mid-17th and 18th century house bonnets worn by women and girls were generally brimless headcoverings which were secured by tying under the chin, and which covered no part of the forehead. They were worn indoors, to keep the hair tidy, and outdoors, to keep dust out of the hair. With hairstyles becoming increasingly elaborate after 1770, the calash was worn outdoors to protect the hair from wind and weather: a hood of silk stiffened with whalebone or arched cane battens, collapsible like a fan or the calash top of a carriage, they were fitted with ribbons to allow them to be held secure in a gale.

From Waterloo, more structured fashionable bonnets made by milliners rapidly grew larger. A plate in La Belle Assemblée 1817 showed a


Bonnet of vermillion-coloured satin, embossed with straw, ornamented slightly with straw-coloured ribbands, and surmounted by a bouquet formed of a full blown damask rose and buds, with ears of ripe corn. This ornament is partially placed on one side: the edge of the bonnet finished by blond [lace] laid on strait.

This was specified as a carriage dress, with the understanding that when taking the air in an open carriage, the bonnet provided some privacy—such a bonnet was in fact an invisible in Paris—and prevent wind-chapping, with its connotations of countrified rude health. Straw was available again after 1815: the best straw bonnets came from Leghorn. As a bonnet developed a peak, it would extend from the entire front of the bonnet, from the chin over the forehead and down the other side of the face. Some styles of bonnets between ca 1817 and 1845 had a large peak which effectively prevented women from looking right or left without turning their heads: a "coal-scuttle" or "poke" bonnet. Others had a wide peak which was angled out to frame the face. In the 1840s it might be crimped at the top to frame the face in a heart shape. As the bonnet became more complicated, under it might be worn a lace cornette to hold the hair in place.

The lack of a clear distinction between hats and bonnets can be seen in these extracts from Harper's Bazaar in 1874: (On "Paris Fashions", by Emmeline Raymond, 11 April) "There is no change in bonnets. So long as the hair is piled on top of the head, the little device which takes the place of a dress cap must remain as it is. The brims are generally flattened at the sides, swelling above the front, and turned up behind in order to make room for the hair, which would not find room whereon to lodge if the precaution were not taken, here and there, to punch out what is called a brim of what is called a bonnet. It is said, however, that straw hats of the Pamela shape are in preparation, that is, turned up behind, but shading the forehead. It would be so sensible to wear a bonnet that would protect the face from the sun that I give this news with due caution. For my part, I can not believe it." A week before, ("New York Fashions", 4 April): "Strings are seldom seen, and this does away with the last distinguishing feature between bonnets and round hats; the same head-covering now serves for each, as it is a bonnet when worn far back on the head, and a hat when tilted forward."

Bonnets remained one of the most common types of headgear worn by women throughout most of the 19th century. For a widow, a bonnet was de rigueur. Silk bonnets, elaborately pleated and ruched, were worn outdoors, or in public places like shops, galleries, churches, and during visits to acquaintances. The idea was that women would cover their heads with caps out of modesty. In addition, women in wedlock would wear caps and bonnets during the day.

Under the French Second Empire, parasols took the place of protection from sun, and bonnets became smaller and smaller, until they could only be held on the head with hatpins. As hats came back into style, bonnets were increasingly worn by women who wanted to appear modest in public, with the result that bonnets accumulated connotations of dowager wear and dropped from fashion except on the prairies.

Most middle-class women in the 19th century would have had at least two bonnets, one suitable for summer weather, often made from straw, and one made from heavier fabric for winter wear. This is where the tradition of an Easter bonnet originated, when women would switch from their winter bonnet to their summer bonnet. Wealthier women would have many bonnets, suitable for different occasions.

Women of some religious groups have continued to wear bonnets for worship or everyday clothing. This is especially the case among plain people, such as plain-dressing Friends (Quakers), Old Order Mennonites and the Amish. Bonnets were adopted by the Salvation Army as part of uniform regalia for women. Initially, Salvation Army bonnets were introduced as protection for women soldiers and were reinforced with black tar to turn them into helmets. Later versions were smaller when there was no longer any need for protection. The bonnet has now been replaced with a bowler hat.

In France, single women wear elaborate yellow and green bonnets to honor St. Catherine's Day on November 25. The French expression coiffer Sainte-Catherine ('don St. Catherine's bonnet'), an idiom that describes an unmarried woman of 25 years or older, derives from this custom.

Bonnets in a Swedish fashion plate from 1838

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/1/19/Magasin_f%C3%B6r_konst%2C_nyheter_och_mo der_1838%2C_illustration_nr_24.jpg/800px-Magasin_f%C3%B6r_konst%2C_nyheter_och_mo der_1838%2C_illustration_nr_24.jpg

White Pioneer Bonnet

https://images.halloweencostumes.com/products/30264/1-1/child-white-pioneer-bonnet.jpg

White Victorian or Edwardian historical bonnet

https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71nbXa48XrL._SY355_.jpg

Wagon Trail Colonial Prairie Bonnet

https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51OtNjU-TRL._SY355_.jpg

Women's Silk Night Cap

https://img2.wantitall.co.za/prodimages/csm-women-s-silk-night-cap-silk-sleep-bonnet-head-cover-for-hair-scalp-beauty__41DFGDJI0wL.jpg#

Womens White Bonnet Medieval Hat

https://www.struts.co.uk/party-fancy-dress-shop/images/3334Lrs.jpg

Siebenbürgerin
Wednesday, October 24th, 2018, 12:57 AM
Headcoverings from the Tudor era

Most women of the early sixteenth century Tudor court wore the gable headdress in its many forms, and later wore the French Hood. However there are several images of women in other forms of head wear.

https://www.uvm.edu/~hag/sca/tudor/parker-pl8-m.jpg

This drawing is probably a preliminary sketch for the painting of Thomas More's family done during Holbein's first visit to England, 1526-28.

https://www.uvm.edu/~hag/sca/tudor/dessinspl28.jpg

Probably drawn during Holbein's first visit, 1526-28.

https://www.uvm.edu/~hag/sca/tudor/parker-pl16-m.jpg

"Mary Howard, daughter of Thomas, third Duke of Norfolk and sister of Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey, born 1519; married Henry Fitzroy, Duke of Richmond, natural son of Henry VIII by Elizabeth Blount, in or after 1533; died 1557."

https://www.uvm.edu/~hag/sca/tudor/dessinspl29.jpg

This and the following drawings were probably done during Holbein's second stay in England, 1532 until his untimely death there by plague in 1543.

https://www.uvm.edu/~hag/sca/tudor/parker-pl49-m.jpg

The hat appears to have a brim. The undercap appears to have a tie under the chin.

https://www.uvm.edu/~hag/sca/tudor/parker-pl48-m.jpg

The hat appears to have a brim. The undercap appears to have a tie under the chin. Note the similarity to the cap worn by the picture labeled "Anna Bollein, Queen" below.

https://www.uvm.edu/~hag/sca/tudor/parker-pl63-m.jpg

Labeled "Anna Bollein, Queen," the attribution is considered incorrect by Parker.

http://www.uvm.edu/~hag/sca/tudor/1532woman.jpg

Portrait of a Woman, c. 1532-35, Holbein. Linen shawl pinned on. Linen cap and wool hat.

http://www.uvm.edu/~hag/sca/tudor/holbsq.jpg

Lady with a Squirrel by Holbein


The source: https://www.uvm.edu/~hag/sca/tudor/bonnet.html


Tudor Gable Headdress

No gown is complete without the appropriate accessories, and for the early 16th century English woman those accessories would include some form of head covering. The following is a collection of images depicting the gable headdress, with an emphasis on the version that was popular from the 1520-40s.

http://www.uvm.edu/~hag/sca/tudor/guildforddet.jpg

Lady Guildford, c. 1527

http://www.uvm.edu/~hag/sca/tudor/ladysketch.jpg

Portrait of an English Lady, c. 1527, Holbein

http://www.uvm.edu/~hag/sca/tudor/redjane.jpg

Jane Seymour, 1537

http://www.uvm.edu/~hag/sca/tudor/parkerpl18.jpg

Frances, Countess of Surrey, c. 1535

http://www.uvm.edu/~hag/sca/tudor/parkerpl27.jpg

Unknown
https://www.uvm.edu/~hag/sca/tudor/gable.html

Siebenbürgerin
Wednesday, October 24th, 2018, 01:29 AM
HOODS - examples of historical hoods

French Hood - a small hood made on a stiff foundation and worn far back. The front border, fitting close round the head, was curved forward on either side to end over the ears, the hair being exposed above this limit only. The back of the crown was raised into a horseshoe-shaped curve over the head.

Gable Hood or English Hood- so-called because its pointed shape resembled the Gable of a house. Originally a simple pointed hood with decorated side panels called lappets and a veil at the back, over time the gable hood became a complex construct with a box-shaped back and two tube-shaped hanging veils; the hanging veils & lappets could be pinned up in a variety of ways.

Atifet (flattened or heart shaped bonnet) - Similar to the French hood style but modified with a heart shaped crescent - favoured by Mary Queen of Scots. Lace trimmings were added.

French Hoods, as reinterpreted by the Tudors (in embellished fabric)

https://alchetron.com/cdn/elizabeth-blount-c35431c1-fd9c-4706-837e-9baf781c1e5-resize-750.jpeg

https://vignette.wikia.nocookie.net/tudors/images/0/01/GW338H473-1-.jpg/revision/latest?cb=20120501064406

https://m.media-amazon.com/images/M/MV5BNTU4NDQ4MzAyOF5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTYwOTg5 NDQ3._V1_.jpg

https://78.media.tumblr.com/b651fc6428337d2736fd3bae0b3f966c/tumblr_p58hsuv3y21x785uyo7_500.jpg

http://image.wikifoundry.com/image/1/QvQ1gBBi-HT72ITnq_vCkw76277

Gable Hoods or English Hoods

https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/originals/06/67/43/0667430900f05b12c1b9f5f6e83383bb.jpg

https://c1.staticflickr.com/3/2502/4057647181_be2110db27_z.jpg?zz=1

https://i.pinimg.com/originals/c2/ac/82/c2ac8277514991a353db849dda3051b7.jpg

Atifets (Heart shaped bonnets)

http://image.wikifoundry.com/image/1/DL9aPz1vIQAN2gWHSez6FQ72616/GW318H477

http://image.wikifoundry.com/image/1/yh9umCZoUJnNsonHSdw6jA29793/GW300H338

More on this page: http://www.thetudorswiki.com/page/HOODS+%26+Headdresses++on+The+Tudors

Siebenbürgerin
Tuesday, October 30th, 2018, 02:19 PM
German costumes from Baden:

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/67/bd/b3/67bdb30e2aa43ae37763bb4b4dae48f3.jpg

Tyrol:

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/31/6b/f0/316bf00b23b599155466a2f5e5958631.jpg

Bavaria:

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/4e/3d/0f/4e3d0f769106d510879d64552befd053.jpg

Schwarzwald:

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/97/4a/8b/974a8b0950115a6140f385a7c3661ffe.jpg

Bodensee:

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/b0/d2/ae/b0d2ae58676e6238cfd779b25d2946fb.jpg

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/db/52/de/db52de9bb9fce99a1a15a56485a358c3.jpg

Bregenzerwald:

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/dd/8c/4f/dd8c4f0250064226d72e9a39f1673693.jpg

Swiss Costumes:

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/2b/1e/10/2b1e10cb3dbce239a5b411fcf63ff679.jpg

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/bb/be/06/bbbe063c00526121789fef8cceb86d0d.jpg

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/51/d7/d2/51d7d23da6bd3399db08d172eed482a8.jpg

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/ea/9f/85/ea9f85b9dbffa0bc3020978f2898db4c.jpg

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/00/da/9f/00da9f7e44e6501ef619bd47f0a8b783.jpg

Wuotans Krieger
Sunday, November 25th, 2018, 09:49 PM
I've the idea from the folk costumes thread. I've an interest in headcoverings like veils, bonnets, wimples, hennins, kerchiefs, gable hoods, or even hats and caps worn by Germanic women throughout history. Not only religious but also parts of folk costumes, for holidays or peasant dress.

Until the latter 20th century, headscarves were commonly worn by women in many parts of the Europe and the Americas, as well as some other parts of the world. In recent decades, headscarves, like hats, have fallen out of favor in Western culture. Until at least the 18th century, the wearing of a headcovering for the hair was regarded as customary for Christian women to agree with contemporary notions of modesty and as an indication of married status; the "matron's cap" is a general term for these. Nuns cover their heads because it is written in the Bible they must be covered while prophesising. In fact, Christian women were first to cover their hair. Muslims were influenced by Byzantine Christians. In early 700, Orthodox Christian women wore head coverings in accordance with the Apostle Paul's command in 1st Corinthians for women to cover their heads in worship.

Some examples of headwear from nowadays and other religious traditions:

Amish

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/23/5c/17/235c17b88b7bb7a6b8f4fe01f5d7a712.jpg

Amish Woman's Covering Cap Kapp Bonnet with strings

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/bd/05/96/bd05964898fad776ca1d5b62fbe38a02.jpg

Amish volunteers

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/e8/d6/41/e8d641e45df29a3518837d8fd10b930c.jpg

Mennonite Woman

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/64/77/00/647700429d37c4183386046302312f3c.jpg

German Baptist Brethren Woman

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/4b/ea/64/4bea6406cdc9a3cd5eee4d88a843f1a4.jpg

17th Century Village at Plimoth Plantation - Plymouth, Massachusetts

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/11/7a/65/117a65035a4861766d43fd2c9d1584ae.jpg

Puritan

https://s.yimg.com/ny/api/res/1.2/ISMwt0ijohKxoRaNLtju9w--~A/YXBwaWQ9aGlnaGxhbmRlcjtzbT0xO3c9ODAw/http://media.zenfs.com/en-US/homerun/nymag_com_989/61c28f81a12f26c0719bdb7bc2e6b714

Early Quaker

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-OhNzQW7QOIc/VAI7aJdepRI/AAAAAAAABwk/l0L1fMkz-jc/s1600/Honor%2Bweb%2Bfriendly.jpg

Quaker

https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-xkNDOauoK2k/WsfjXLidg3I/AAAAAAAAI4Y/zdAfoM2s3Mc4A58oDmSIY4PlciBE286MQCLcBGAs/s1600/Turning%2Bthe%2BTide.jpg

Shaker

https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71Dr0r5iSPL.jpg

https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71-np4L-wPL.jpg

Hutterite

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/52/1c/40/521c40b12ce2937ad69dced1ffab0525.jpg

Bruderhof

https://scontent-atl3-1.cdninstagram.com/vp/42c62a30585900f4c82161c2dede7267/5C4B0BD0/t51.2885-15/e35/41299267_243376439642931_130833187768360 6370_n.jpg

They look horrendous and have nothing at all to do with authentic GERMANIC costume. This is 18th century AMERICAN Christian!

Volk und Rasse
Saturday, January 5th, 2019, 11:06 PM
It's a very XIX century american fashion design at this point, but they tend to look modest and cute

https://fotos.subefotos.com/a22abeb3cea5aac6d0990a71e6e2cbbdo.jpg

I don't know if they are mennonites or amish, but it's always nice to see modest and simple dressing.
This one is the most simple of them all and it's from the Iron Age

https://i.pinimg.com/originals/32/c8/92/32c8920b55c53615c57b03ec6f00e5f8.jpg