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View Full Version : Football, A European Culture And Tradition, Killed By Globalism!



Resist
Sunday, September 9th, 2018, 07:08 PM
How many of us, men and women, boys or girls, Europeans, fanatics or supporters of the “king of sports”, don’t like the fervor of when the weekend comes and the heart begins to tighten, tensions rise and the emotions are high as the hour of the football game of our team is approaching?

Now, this article, clearly, will only be understood by our readers who like football and are European! “Europeans? But football is also practiced in America, Asia, Africa etc… “Yes, in Europe!” Because here football finds its roots, here football is tradition, it’s culture… It’s something unique… Something European…

It can be said that football finds its origins in China in the second or third century. But it wasn’t quite the football we have today. Something quite different. It was a sport where a ball was thrown at the feet and the players tried to put it in a net or basket at some considerable distance.

The true football, of eleven players and constituted by a number of rules, dates back to the 17th century in England and the late 16th century in Italy, where it was designated as “Calcio Italiano”. Later, in the nineteenth century, the sport is developed in the British Isles and is officially constituted a set of rules that formed the football, of eleven players, two teams and where the objective was to place the ball in the goal net located on opposite terrain, as possible.

And so European football was formed. Swiftly, the sport was popularly embraced and countries such as Scotland, Ireland and Wales “welcomed” the “football culture”. And as a kind of plague, the sport arrived, in a short time, to the rest of Europe and even to South America, a region that it is possible to be said that one can also breathe the football tradition.

But the sport, went way beyond that! It quickly became a culture, a tradition, a form of identity, compassion for the team and for the players representing a town, a city… And that in the name of that city they created history and created unity. Political rivalries, conflicts with the neighbor or family were forgotten, and a city was united in a spirit very difficult to characterize, something simply unique. And it was not just a city. When the best players were called to represent a country, a population, an ethnicity, it was a unique and brilliant phenomenon. The union that was observed when the national team played was something inexplicable. 90 minutes capable of alleviating the problems of a people and creating a wave of happiness and compassion among the nation itself. Obviously, if the football club or national team won the match.

And what is the tradition and culture of football?

It’s a feeling! A feeling that starts from the beginning of the week until the time of the game. It’s not sleeping the night before the game. It’s waking up early on match-day, eating the typical sausage and drinking the morning coffee for breakfast while turning on the radio or television and reading the newspaper with the football news. To a little boy when he goes to the game with his father or grandfather that buys the typical “hotdog” in the carriages near the stadium and the boy asks his father to buy the scarf of his team to the man who is standing all day with the arms outstretched and filled with a pile of scarves.

A sense of pride for the city and the club that effervesces in the youths when they join the “lads” in the pubs and stay there all day drinking beer, waiting for rival fans to come to town to see if it they can create some trouble and show hostility to them.

To the point where we become adults and we look like “mad bulls” at work when the cup draw is being broadcast and we wait with the greatest of expectations to match a local rival or another club town and we make fun of our co-workers when their team loses, until we reach a considerable age and it is our duty to pass on that feeling, that pride, that passion for the city, for the nation, for the local club, to our future generations.

Oh, and the moment when our team scores? Even more inexplicable… A tumor of joy that screams of our soul and controls our voice and our mind. Joy to see our city or locality experiencing small moments of grandeur, joy in seeing the local players enhance our identity… But those days are gone… Some say that it still resides in the lower leagues… But business, money, corruption and political interests have already completely infiltrated this sport. And the small clubs fight for their survival, and they can only surrender to the plans of the business and globalist elite that rules this sport, in order to achieve their objectives and ensure their existence. The tradition of football no longer exists. Young people already support international teams or the national champion and are not interested in local pride. Going to football is tantamount to going to a movie show where the royal family or the presidency is present, and you have to work a full week or two to get enough money left to pay a ticket. Television dominates the sport! The games are at midweek where the workers are tired and have no chance of going to the stadium and choose to watch the game at home on their couch. Players use equipment with an absurd amount of sponsorship’s. Sponsorship’s of foreign companies or rather “global” reputation. Local businesses and companies are no longer supported. Worse than that, local players are not valued and used, not even nationals. Football teams look more like centers of diversity. History and local culture are abandoned in exchange for money, diversity, interests of agents and political interests. Football has become the government’s engine of keeping the man and especially young teens uneducated, without culture and of no interest to politics, so it is easier to commit atrocities and government corruption without attracting public attention. In the old days politicians waged war to intensify nationalism, the spirit of unity and increase happiness… Today they bet on football.

And those who still struggle to preserve the culture and tradition of football and their city are automatically targets of the system. From the hooligans, to the fanatics who are present at all games, to the nationalist “ultras” dubbed as “far right”. Whether due to the increase of ticket prices or to the “bombardment” of the media, they disappear and see their struggle’s increased.

Ultras protesting against the current state of football

Thus football has become the sport of the elite and the government, the sport of the tourist, the sport of agents and entrepreneurs, the sport of the big television networks, the sport of money… Everything but the sports of fans and the folk!

Formerly players played for the pride and passion to the shirt and city… And today? Now they play in exchange for millions… Even a locksmith or a carpenter would have a better chance of succeeding economically if he were to play football nowadays…

And pride for the nation? What is made of it? Disappeared too! How can you be proud of the “national” team when it is represented by non-native players who barely speak the language and who are the result of the multicultural policies of an inhuman and suicidal nature by our government?

Some countries are still resisting and have managed to maintain their football tradition. Eastern European countries and perhaps Italy, in my opinion…

England, France, Germany, Spain, Italy, Netherlands? Some in greater degree, but all these countries, among more others not mentioned, have already lost their football culture…

And the football that used to reassure me against the corruption and the disaster of the government has now become ineffective for me… Worse indeed! It just magnifies the ideal that I live in hell… My passion for my club disappears with each passing day… And the same can be said for my national team! My football club is represented by 23 elements of African or South American origin and only 4 players of native origin. And my team, supposedly, represents the roots of my fatherland. It was from my city that Portugal was born, but Porto today is anything but Portuguese, whether in football, politics or society…

If only we could, as in my dreams, revolt against modern football… But I think its too late… Football fans decreasingly feel the same as I do…https://www.defendevropa.org/2018/the-establishment/football-a-european-culture-and-tradition-killed-by-globalism/

Aelfgar
Sunday, September 9th, 2018, 11:44 PM
International football is losing its meaning because of too many non-native players. But club football has been meaningless for decades - it is essentially competing teams of mercenaries with no connection to the towns they are supposed to represent.

velvet
Monday, September 10th, 2018, 12:05 AM
Indeed. If it's cities with their own youth trained and maintained, you can take it for a city competition thing of team sport event. If it ceases to be that...well, what Aelfgar said. Meaningless then.

Our Kaiser, when confronted with this nonsense sport, said:
Was soll diese undeutsche Fußlümmelei?
What's this un-German foot-lolling about?
:wsg

So I'm not even sure whether I want to agree that it's so European. It was not, it was imported, and only became "peoples sport" through massive propaganda, mainly post-war, in Anglo-nations already before. Media makes it look as if that was the only sport we ever had and wanted and pushes everything else aside.

Yet, truely "national sport" is for many European countries Icehockey (from Sweden to Czech Republic and everything inbetween), Germany, Netherlands and central Europe also have a strong horse sport, but it rarely exists in media because football pushes everything to the fringes.

Can't say I'd be sorry if it was destroyed (but I'm a woman anyway and never had interest in it in the first place), then there's more space for all the other sports and it would also help to sort out the financial insanity involved in "football business" which destroys so much on the local level.

Aelfgar
Monday, September 10th, 2018, 10:00 PM
I always thought football originated in England, but the historians are unsure:
https://www.fifa.com/about-fifa/who-we-are/the-game/britain-home-of-football.html

"One theory is that the game is Anglo-Saxon in origin. In both Kingston-on-Thames and Chester, local legend has it the game was played there for the first time with the severed head of a vanquished Danish prince. In Derby, it is said to have originated in the third century during the victory celebrations that followed a battle against the Romans. Yet there is scant evidence of the sport having been played at this time, either in Saxon areas or on the continent. Indeed prior to the Norman conquest, the only trace found of any such ball game comes from a Celtic source.

Another theory regarding its origin is that when 'mob football' was being played in the British Isles in the early centuries AD, a similar game was thriving in France, particularly in the northern regions of Normandy and Brittany. So it is possible that the Normans brought this form of the game to England with them."

Anyway, my ideas to make football more meaningful:

A European national team (on the field) must have at least 9/11 players of at least 7/8 European ancestry, of which at least 7 must be of at least 1/2 national ancestry.

A club team must have at least 7/11 players with a strong connection to the town/city represented. For example, a 'home' player will have attended school for more than 6 years within a radius of 13km (8 miles) of the town/city.

E.g. the home radius for the German club Hannover 96:

https://i45.servimg.com/u/f45/19/71/28/23/hanove10.png

Maybe the radius should be bigger - it could vary according to the concentration of towns in the country.

This would still allow the best 'mercenary' players to move around and gain experience to be good enough for the national team.

The same should go for all team sports where there is inter-town competition.

Chlodovech
Tuesday, September 11th, 2018, 03:53 PM
Can't say I'd be sorry if it was destroyed (but I'm a woman anyway and never had interest in it in the first place), then there's more space for all the other sports and it would also help to sort out the financial insanity involved in "football business" which destroys so much on the local level.

It is a very sad thing indeed when a local football club has to dissolve itself because of financial reasons. Then 6-12 year olds who love to kick a ball on wednesdays and saturdays see their hobby ruined while losing a social hangout - sport teams exist because of their social and health functions, or that's the way it's supposed to be. I know guys who play in provincial football leagues, they're amateurs, and yet they can earn up to 500 euro (!) every month if they perform well on sunday. And their teams are not even top of the provincial leagues. The desire to become ever more competitive makes football managers pay ever more insane wages and transfer sums (thanks to the enormous demand for footage of European football games in Asia and around the world, some got that money, but not all) - and what happens on a national level has a detrimental effect on your local football team, which finds itself in a race to keep up. Unlike professional clubs, provincial level teams are actually local and consists of 11 people from your village, if you live in the countryside. But even at this amateur level you see more transfers happening though and in some places more migrants on the pitch too.

I still love the game, I love the tradition of football - I like all the mythical names and clubs - but I do hope the professional sport collapses, together with the corrupt FIFA and it's "anti-racism" campaigns. It's only a matter of time anyway. We're less than a decade away from the formation of a World League, then the Champions League will come to an end as well - the best European teams will leave our continent and play in a world competition (how ridiculous is that?) - because there's more money to be made that way, Asian and American TV stations want this setup and they have so much money that they will get their way. No European fan wants this, nobody is looking forward to see some third rate Chinese, North-American and Arab teams play against European top teams. The only people who could want that are those who stand to gain financially from it - and perhaps some football fans around the world may warm up to the idea, especially in countries with little or no football tradition (India, China, the U.S.) - but especially the "tourists" and the celebs, those who lack the beating heart of tradition, will go to the world league games. Best of luck to the fans who may have to travel to another continent twice every month to be able to watch their team play away games, only the rich can afford this lifestyle.

Picture it: a Bundesliga and Europa cups without Bayern Munchen and Borussia Dortmund. Or a Premier League without Man UTD, Liverpool, Manchester City, Arsenal, Tottenham and Chelsea. The damage that will do to all the other teams, national leagues and European football is going to be devastating - from a massive drop in attendance to a lack of quality and competition. I hope for the best - that the European teams survive financially and then purge themselves while they await the inevitable downfall of the world league, they have to let go of insane wages/transfer sums, and become more like they were decades ago.


Yet, truely "national sport" is for many European countries Icehockey (from Sweden to Czech Republic and everything inbetween), Germany, Netherlands and central Europe also have a strong horse sport, but it rarely exists in media because football pushes everything to the fringes.

Don't forget cycling! It's overwhelmingly West-European with few outsiders participating in races. We have zero affinity with icehockey over here, but cycling is the only sport able to compete with football from time to time in our neck of the woods.

Aelfgar
Tuesday, September 11th, 2018, 11:40 PM
Rules limiting corporate sponsorship and foreign ownership of clubs would be a big part of the solution. But that's anti-capitalist!


Don't forget cycling! It's overwhelmingly West-European with few outsiders participating in races. We have zero affinity with icehockey over here, but cycling is the only sport able to compete with football from time to time in our neck of the woods.This man was my granddad's cousin: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bill_Bradley_(cyclist)

Fire spirit
Thursday, December 13th, 2018, 07:13 AM
I always thought football originated in England, but the historians are unsure:
https://www.fifa.com/about-fifa/who-we-are/the-game/britain-home-of-football.html


I'm old enough to remember David Beckam as a football player. Look at this ancient Greek carving, so eat your heart out David.

113920
Source Attic Lekythos, Piraeus.

Astragoth
Thursday, December 13th, 2018, 01:14 PM
I had no idea soccer was that old.