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Zyklop
Sunday, August 29th, 2004, 06:27 PM
List of most common German family names:
http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y161/Zyklop/familiennamen3.jpg

Map of regionally most common family names:
http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y161/Zyklop/familiennamen4.jpg

Source: Duden - Familiennamen

Drömmarnas Stig
Sunday, August 29th, 2004, 08:10 PM
Thanks for the list, very interesting.

I was born in Westfalen, between Bielefeld and Kassel.

My family name is rather uncommon, but fortunately firmly nordid.
It's a variation of the name of Odin's wife Freya, Frigg, Frigga.
(Of course I won't post the actual name, who knows who is reading this forum) :D

WernerDamsch
Tuesday, August 31st, 2004, 10:54 AM
Is Ott a real german family name?

JoeDas
Tuesday, August 31st, 2004, 11:39 AM
Is Ott a real german family name?And what about Martin and Thomas? Both are on this list. They don't seem to me to be German names either, though I could be wrong

Zyklop
Tuesday, August 31st, 2004, 03:53 PM
Is Ott a real german family name?

Was sonst?

Ott(e): -> Otto

Wenn Du Otto nicht als deutschen Namen erkennst, solltest Du nochmal die Geschichtsbücher wälzen ;)

Allenson
Tuesday, August 31st, 2004, 03:53 PM
Being a miller or a smith were obviously popular occupations.... ;)

Zyklop
Tuesday, August 31st, 2004, 04:08 PM
Being a miller or a smith were obviously popular occupations.... ;)

Yes, most of these names have to do with occupations.

1. Müller - miller
2. Schmidt - smith
3. Schneider - couturier
4. Fischer - fisher
5. Meyer - big farmer
6. Weber - weaver
7. Wagner - wainwright
8. Becker - baker
9. Schulz (Schultheiß) - judge
10. Hoffmann - farmer

Loki
Tuesday, August 31st, 2004, 06:57 PM
I suggest Petersen and Hansen in the Schleswig-Holstein district is originally of Danish derivation.

Nordgau
Tuesday, August 31st, 2004, 07:29 PM
And what about Martin and Thomas? Both are on this list. They don't seem to me to be German names either, though I could be wrong

Many Christian names of former names became surnames and are usually patronymica. That Thomas and Martin aren't German in their origin, doesn't alter that. Other traditional Christian names of Germans like Johannes, Peter or Jakob aren't either. And Thomas and Martin should also be spreaded as surnames in England.

Chevy
Tuesday, August 31st, 2004, 10:04 PM
I suggest Petersen and Hansen in the Schleswig-Holstein district is originally of Danish derivation.

Yepp .... cause the "sen" in the name mean "Son" so the Surename was given ... long long long time ago from the father from 1 of the ancestors:
"Petersen" = Peters Son
"Hansen" = Hans Son

Thanks I learned that in german school a few years ago, now they only teach this fucking "multiculti" stuff ....

GreenHeart
Tuesday, August 31st, 2004, 10:51 PM
Very interesting!

Nordgau
Wednesday, September 1st, 2004, 01:17 AM
Northern German patronymica with the suffix -sen (other examples are Diederichsen, Friederichsen. Ingwersen, Volquardsen, Claussen, Thomsen, Boysen, Johannsen, Paulsen, Jenssen, Frenssen) are concentrated predominantly in northern Lower Saxony and Schleswig-Holstein, there again they are spreaded more in Schleswig than in Holstein and become more and more towards the Danish border. Schleswig-Holstein's relation with and approximation to Denmark through history and culture are of course given, but it wouldn't be correct to call them of Danish derivation, as the names, including the -sen as "weak" and "dull" suffix as what is today in modern standard German Sohn, do originate as such in the Lower German of the region and not in Danish where the same or equivalent names also exist. Patronymica with -sen are, as far as I know, also common in Holland.

KraftAkt
Tuesday, November 22nd, 2005, 09:40 PM
Its obvious that most names are derived from their work. It seems really that work has always been very important for the german people.

Nordgau
Wednesday, November 23rd, 2005, 01:43 PM
I fear that in a few decades the Müllers and Schmidts will be overtaken in some metropolitan areas by the Öztürks and Özdemirs.

KraftAkt
Saturday, November 26th, 2005, 11:48 PM
I fear that in a few decades the Müllers and Schmidts will be overtaken in some metropolitan areas by the Öztürks and Özdemirs.

I also hope not. What makes me wonder is that the most famous first names in Germany dont have any turkish names in them.

http://www.beliebte-vornamen.de/2005.htm

Sure they arent as nice as hundred years ago, but still somehow german.
It would be great if the kids would have more real german names again.

http://www.beliebte-vornamen.de/1890.htm
:highfive:

Barry_Lyndon
Tuesday, November 29th, 2005, 07:57 AM
My mother's maiden name is Moll, which I was told is found throughout Baden and the Netherlands, as von or van Moll. Her family originally came from Urloffen, which is in Baden, Germany. Could this in any way be linked to the Anglo-Saxon Moll's of Aethelwald and Aethelred? I was just curious if anyone has any thoughts.

Sigurd
Tuesday, November 29th, 2005, 01:24 PM
If this was a Tyrolese chart, then it would be Fuchs followed by Gruber. Both I which I happen to have in close proximity in my family.

But my own name remains to be only common around the area of Taxenbach and Rauris in Salzburg, but in Tyrol, I believe we're the only family that bears it.

@Nordgau: Yeah. :frown:

"Germany's most popular forename in 2025:"
1. Ali
2. Muhammet
3. Hasan
4. Mustaffa
5. Ivo
...
1119992. Josef

"Germany's most popular surnames in 2025:"
1. Oztürk
2. Yilmaz
3. Gercülü
4. Jurcic
5. Al-Sharijf
...
198876. Müller

:speechles

Zyklop
Tuesday, November 29th, 2005, 05:48 PM
My mother's maiden name is Moll, which I was told is found throughout Baden and the Netherlands, as von or van Moll. Her family originally came from Urloffen, which is in Baden, Germany. Could this in any way be linked to the Anglo-Saxon Moll's of Aethelwald and Aethelred? I was just curious if anyone has any thoughts.According to Duden Familiennamen it could be:

1. Formed from Middle High German mol, molle = lizard, newt, maybe as a nickname for a plump and clumsy person.

2. Formed from Low German mol = mole

Barry_Lyndon
Wednesday, December 7th, 2005, 04:25 PM
That's makes sense, about the newt. Most of my family is plump and clumsy (just kidding). Thank you for looking it up. Vielen Dank!

KraftAkt
Wednesday, December 7th, 2005, 05:23 PM
Indeed the name Moll is found mainly in the west and southwest of Germany.

http://de.geocities.com/fightingcrack/map.png

Zyklop
Wednesday, December 7th, 2005, 05:39 PM
Nice map.Looks like an interesting Program. Do you use it?

KraftAkt
Wednesday, December 7th, 2005, 05:46 PM
Yes, I have it. Its ease to use. But its only good for names that arent that common, because it cant handle names that have more than 5000 entries in the telefonbook. :rolleyes:

Sigurd
Wednesday, December 7th, 2005, 05:53 PM
Good. Mine is rare. :)

Ummm...so this works for Austria as well?

And, where to get this program from?

Zyklop
Wednesday, December 7th, 2005, 05:58 PM
It´s freeware.

http://christoph.stoepel.net/geogen.aspx

You have to install the online database function (see instructions).
Works for Austria too.

KraftAkt
Wednesday, December 7th, 2005, 05:58 PM
Yes, works for Austria and Switzerland as well.

I can look it up for you or you install it from here:

http://christoph.stoepel.net/geogen.aspx

Edit: well done Zyklop. :thumb001:

Zyklop
Wednesday, December 7th, 2005, 06:13 PM
Doesn´t work with Firefox, though. One has to open the html files manually with IE.

KraftAkt
Wednesday, December 7th, 2005, 06:18 PM
Im using Firefox. Works fine. :)

Zyklop
Wednesday, December 7th, 2005, 06:34 PM
Im using Firefox. Works fine. :)
Ah, Firefox has problems with the "ö" in "Stöpel". After changing the directory name it works fine.

HakkeTschiepTschiep
Friday, December 23rd, 2005, 11:44 AM
my name is a german one, but there aren´t many people with this name:D ...i think there are only 20, who have that name..."Böbs"...*lol*..i don´t the meaning or anything else, but i know it´s coming from Lübeck, a city in schleswig-holstein...i´m still living in germany..near Hamburg

greetz

Zyklop
Monday, December 26th, 2005, 12:29 PM
Geogen now is a free online service:

http://christoph.stoepel.net/geogen.aspx

(Doesn´t work for Austria, though.)

HakkeTschiepTschiep
Monday, December 26th, 2005, 01:12 PM
Unfortunately, I can find nothing about my surname "Böbs". Does somebody know where I can look? Free of charge? Or can somebody find something about it?

Greetings

Zyklop
Monday, December 26th, 2005, 01:23 PM
Geogen shows 31 entries for "Böbs".

Ulf
Saturday, March 11th, 2006, 01:44 AM
Very cool. My last name and my mother's maiden name are on there.

AndreasBolle
Saturday, March 11th, 2006, 03:37 PM
Is anyone familiar with the surmane Bolle. I believe it is my mother's family name. She lives/lived in Berlin-Spandau, at least in the late 50s.

Forrest Brother
Thursday, May 25th, 2006, 07:18 AM
Could someone give me some info on the German Names:

Weiss and Konig(My computer does not have an Umlaut button for Konig.)

Do these names originate from a certain region in Germany? Were there any significant people in History with these names? I've noticed the Jews took a liking to name Weiss, why is this? These questions along with any information would be great. Thank you.

Veritas Æquitas
Thursday, May 25th, 2006, 01:05 PM
König
is without a doubt a Bavarian name which was a name often used to denote a King, as you probably know. This name has also been adopted by Jews.

Weiss is very common Jewish name, and I read somewhere that Jews were required to adopt German names by law, can't remember for which reason, but perhaps for intergration. I don't know where it originates though.

Sorry I can't be much more help.

SuuT
Thursday, May 25th, 2006, 05:37 PM
...I read somewhere that Jews were required to adopt German names by law, can't remember for which reason, but perhaps for intergration. I don't know where it originates though.

Sorry I can't be much more help.

Jews often chose historically Germanic names in Germany (and Germanic regions) so as to keep a low profile. 'The wandering Jew' has never really had a homeland per se; except that to which they now claim as theirs--primarily by philological error. The surname Berg or Burg is a also popular pseudonym.

Forrest Brother
Friday, May 26th, 2006, 02:25 AM
Anyone else got any info?

Zyklop
Friday, May 26th, 2006, 12:46 PM
Could someone give me some info on the German Names:

Weiss and Konig(My computer does not have an Umlaut button for Konig.)

Do these names originate from a certain region in Germany? Were there any significant people in History with these names? I've noticed the Jews took a liking to name Weiss, why is this? These questions along with any information would be great. Thank you.
Weiss means white and König means king. Both names are very common among Germans.

If you want to check their geographic distribution:
http://christoph.stoepel.net/Geogen-localized-en.aspx

Skalagrim
Friday, July 7th, 2006, 02:20 PM
What about German surnames Busch, Schmidt, Fischer, Schulz etc. Were there (other than Germany/Austria/Switzerland - German speaking countries) rife intergermanic surnames as Busch, Schmidt, Fischer, Schulz (No Bush, Smith, Fisher, Shulz)? May be in Sweden, Danmark, GB?

Oswiu
Friday, July 7th, 2006, 02:30 PM
If you want to check their geographic distribution:
http://christoph.stoepel.net/Geogen-localized-en.aspx
Is there anything similar for Austria, does anybody know?

I am interested in the name Bierman, borne by an affinal relative of mine. He says it's Austrian, and doesn't think it's Jewish, but his family's only lived in England in living memory.

I looked for it in Zyklop's link, but there were only a handful of individuals, in Muenchen and on the Belgian border. :shrug

Blutwölfin
Friday, July 7th, 2006, 06:33 PM
I know several people with the name Biermann, but they're German (located in the north), not Austrian.

Busch, Schmidt, Fischer, Schulz etc. are no Scandinavian names.

athmannvedanta
Friday, July 7th, 2006, 07:46 PM
I can't remember where I read or learned this, but I think it was from people or the prof in my German lit classes in Uni.

During Early medieval European times Germans themselves had no family names. Towns were smaller and relations more intimate so last names were not an issue. Instead Germans had simple names that went something like this:

Hans the Blacksmith
Peter the Carpenter, etc

Sometime around the 1300's the Nobles asked Germans to take Second (family) names. Most chose the name of the Noble in whose protectorate they lived.

Jews however, because they did not recognize European Nobility as part of their culture or people, instead adopted names of their own making.

Often they chose names from nature (Rosenthal=rose valley, Rothschild=red shield, Katz=cat, Weissblut=white blood, Breitbart=broad beard, Feingold, Silber, etc)

When these Jews left Germany, many just before WW2, they arrived on AMerican shores and anglicized those names or changed them to obfuscate their meanings and their identity as jews.

For example, the name Schlachter=Butcher or Slaughterer, a common jewish name and something Jews love to do, was changed to Schachter by dropping the " l " making it sound something like a kind of chess player. This threw off the German population who might otherwise have figured out it was a Jew's name.

Schlachtschneider=Slaughtercutter became Schachtschneider and thereby in meaning something very different from its original. Or they Anglicized it to Slaughter.

In todays mass media, if an announcer's or host's name sounds remotely German, you can pretty well bet on it being a Jew or a crypto-Jew or at least someone with Jewish genes in their past. Combine that knowledge with the look on their face (always a give away for a Jew) and you pretty well have your answer.

Skalagrim
Friday, July 7th, 2006, 08:21 PM
...Busch, Schmidt, Fischer, Schulz etc. are no Scandinavian names.

Schulz - German: status name for a village headman, from a contracted form of Middle High German schultheize. The term originally denoted a man responsible for collecting dues and paying them to the lord of the manor; it is a compound of sculd(a) ‘debt’, ‘due’ + a derivative of heiz(z)an ‘to command’. The surname is also established in Scandinavia.

http://www.ancestry.com/learn/facts/Fact.aspx?fid=10&ln=Schultz&fn=&yr=&

more (for example)
http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0703217/bio
http://www.sweden.se/templates/cs/Article____12082.aspx
http://scandinaviandesign.com/henrikschulz/index.htm

Fischer - I know scotch origin american with surname Fischer (Scotch clan from Stornaway)

Oswiu
Friday, July 7th, 2006, 08:48 PM
I know several people with the name Biermann, but they're German (located in the north), not Austrian.
Ah, Double N! I just checked that version in the database Zyklop linked to and it's VERY common throughout Germany. I suppose my uncle's family just dropped the N after coming to England.

[There is an English name Bierman, but this is rare and from bier meaning manger, or something cattle eat from]

Jäger
Friday, July 7th, 2006, 09:47 PM
For example, the name Schlachter=Butcher or Slaughterer, a common jewish name and something Jews love to do, was changed to Schachter by dropping the " l " making it sound something like a kind of chess player. This threw off the German population who might otherwise have figured out it was a Jew's name.
Schächten is the "german" word for kosher butchering, or hebrew. schechitah.
It has nothing to do with chess, and is not less "slaughtering" in meaning, actually for a german it is more offensive, since the kosher butchering is more cruel to the animals.

Blutwölfin
Friday, July 7th, 2006, 11:02 PM
Schulz - German: status name for a village headman, from a contracted form of Middle High German schultheize. The term originally denoted a man responsible for collecting dues and paying them to the lord of the manor; it is a compound of sculd(a) ‘debt’, ‘due’ + a derivative of heiz(z)an ‘to command’. The surname is also established in Scandinavia.

I never met someone in Sweden or Norway with the name "Schulz". Maybe there are a few, like 1 of 1.000 or even less. But this does not make it "a Scandinavian surname".

Blutwölfin
Friday, July 7th, 2006, 11:04 PM
Schächten is the "german" word for kosher butchering, or hebrew. schechitah.
It has nothing to do with chess, and is not less "slaughtering" in meaning, actually for a german it is more offensive, since the kosher butchering is more cruel to the animals.


You're absolutely right, Jäger. The name Schachter has no connection with the game chess (Schach), never was associated with it and doesn't have the same roots like the word - or even the same roots as "Schlachter". It's simply a "translation" of a Hebrew word into German.

Teutonic
Saturday, July 8th, 2006, 12:42 AM
we should make a sticky so we could learn the origins of all our surnames. many jews have german names i noticed this from an early age as a kid.they also have irish/scottish names to like james,scott etc.

anyone know where my name may have come from in Deutschland, my father said when he was in munich it was everywhere. HOFFART

Koran
Saturday, August 5th, 2006, 02:55 PM
'Hi, id like to know about these names and if theyre jewish or not. The first name is Meiswinkel( varients in English are Maiswinkle, mieswinkel). My mom was told it might have used to be von Meiswinkel and they were from Dusseldorf. The second name is Himmelsbach and I think they were from Baden.'

Veritas Æquitas
Saturday, August 5th, 2006, 07:44 PM
Those names don't sound typically Jewish to me, google the meaning on your surname.

Zyklop
Saturday, August 5th, 2006, 07:51 PM
'Hi, id like to know about these names and if theyre jewish or not. The first name is Meiswinkel( varients in English are Maiswinkle, mieswinkel). My mom was told it might have used to be von Meiswinkel and they were from Dusseldorf. The second name is Himmelsbach and I think they were from Baden.' They don´t sound Jewish.

For further information try:

http://www.ancestry.com/learn/facts/Fact.aspx?fid=10&ln=

http://christoph.stoepel.net/Geogen-localized-en.aspx

Berliners Remember
Sunday, August 6th, 2006, 04:29 AM
Germans last names in my family: on my mothers side is Whitesel which was spelled Weitzel long ago before my great grandfather came from the Rhineland. My fathers is Brown which was of course was Braun (i think).

mischak
Wednesday, August 16th, 2006, 08:02 AM
Some of my German ancesters had the name "Ziegenhagen". I don't really know where it comes from, and it doesn't sound very common either. I asked my boyfriend (he's German) if he ever heard it before and he said no.

Then again I asked about him about my grandmother's maiden name, which is Warnke, and he said he never heard that before either, but my grandmother told me it's not too uncommon in Northern Germany heh

Jäger
Wednesday, August 16th, 2006, 10:08 AM
Some of my German ancesters had the name "Ziegenhagen". ... I asked my boyfriend (he's German) if he ever heard it before and he said no.
Next time you should ask him if the name sounds like a village. Many surnames in Germany reflect where your ancestors where comming from, and Ziegenhagen is indeed a german village in Hesse. Since it still seems rather small, no wonder why it wouldn't be common :D


...my grandmother's maiden name, which is Warnke... but my grandmother told me it's not too uncommon in Northern Germany heh
All surnames ending with -ke indicate low-german origin, it is a minimization.

mischak
Wednesday, August 16th, 2006, 11:39 AM
Next time you should ask him if the name sounds like a village. Many surnames in Germany reflect where your ancestors where comming from, and Ziegenhagen is indeed a german village in Hesse. Since it still seems rather small, no wonder why it wouldn't be common :D


All surnames ending with -ke indicate low-german origin, it is a minimization.

Wow, that's interesting, I didn't know about the city/village thing. Thanks! and also about Warnke being north German.. I was pretty sure I was right about it, at least my grandmother is German so I'm sure she'd know about her own name, but I think my boyfriend just didn't want to admit I was right lol

Also I just looked this up, Other spelling variations include: Werner, Waerner, Warncke, Werneke, Warnke (Hamburg)

My grandmother is from a small town near Hamburg

Jäger
Wednesday, August 16th, 2006, 12:03 PM
Also I just looked this up, Other spelling variations include: Werner, Waerner, Warncke, Werneke, Warnke (Hamburg)
As I said -ke is a minimization, which means Warnke is the little cuty version of Werner :)

Here is a map of low-german areas.


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/6/64/FRANCOSAXON.PNG

mischak
Wednesday, August 16th, 2006, 05:53 PM
Thanks for the map! :]

oneeyeisbetter
Friday, August 18th, 2006, 01:28 PM
my dads last name is Steffey.:thumbup

Bridie
Saturday, August 19th, 2006, 02:35 PM
Does anyone know off-hand which areas of Germany (if indeed they are definately German names!) the surnames; Kerkhoff, Hansch and Reitmajer come from?

Jäger
Saturday, August 19th, 2006, 03:09 PM
Does anyone know off-hand which areas of Germany (if indeed they are definately German names!) the surnames; Kerkhoff, Hansch and Reitmajer come from?
Kerkhoff - Kerk is low german for Kirche (church), so it's origin should be low-german or dutch for that matter :)
Hansch - is a minimazation of Hans, it's also low-german if I am not mistaken, could be from anywhere though, was quite popular me thinks :P
Reitmajer - is most likely of east-german origin, majer is also polish, most likely it will be a town in former east Germany.

And yes, they are indeed german names :)

Zyklop
Sunday, August 20th, 2006, 01:20 PM
Does anyone know off-hand which areas of Germany (if indeed they are definately German names!) the surnames; Kerkhoff, Hansch and Reitmajer come from?
http://christoph.stoepel.net/Geogen-localized-en.aspx :oanieyes

Bridie
Monday, August 21st, 2006, 02:17 PM
:-O Zyklop - you're not actually suggesting that I should read a thread before I post in it are you! :wsg LOL No, really, I took a look at the first link you provided and it wasn't much help, so I just posted without looking at the second one.... pity since that one's pretty bloody good! :thumbup So thanks for that! :)

oneeyeisbetter
Tuesday, August 22nd, 2006, 01:25 AM
By any chance can anyone tell me where the surnames Steffey (or Steffi) & Cheatwood (or Chitwode) come from and how "Germanic" they are?

Veritas Æquitas
Tuesday, August 22nd, 2006, 01:46 AM
Cheatwood is most probably Anglo-Saxon
And Steffey is probably from Steffenson which is Prussian I believe.

AndreasBolle
Tuesday, August 22nd, 2006, 02:39 PM
Does anyone have any thoughts regarding the surname Bolle? My mother's family came/comes from Spandau-Berlin. I, unfortunately, have no other information.

Blood Bound
Saturday, August 26th, 2006, 02:58 PM
Anyone have any info on my last name "Vogel?"

Weiler
Thursday, September 14th, 2006, 06:32 AM
Apologies if this has been posted before.

Surnames

1. Müller
2. Schmidt
3. Schneider
4. Fischer
5. Meyer
6. Weber
7. Wagner
8. Becker
9. Schulz
10. Hoffmann
11. Schäfer
12. Koch
13. Bauer
14. Richter
15. Klein
16. Wolf
17. Schröder
18. Neumann
19. Schwarz
20. Zimmermann
21. Braun
22. Krüger
23. Hofmann
24. Hartmann
25. Lange
26. Schmitt
27. Werner
28. Schmitz
29. Krause
30. Meier
31. Lehmann
32. Schmid
33. Schulze
34. Maier
35. Köhler
36. Herrmann
37. König
38. Walter
39. Mayer
40. Huber
41. Kaiser
42. Fuchs
43. Peters
44. Lang
45. Scholz
46. Möller
47. Weiß
48. Jung
49. Hahn
50. Schubert

Most popular first names, 2005

Girls
1. Lea / Leah
2. Anna
3. Hanna / Hannah
4. Sara / Sarah
5. Lara
6. Laura
7. Lilli / Lilly / Lili
8. Emily / Emilie
9. Leonie / Leoni
10. Lena
11. Mia
12. Emma
13. Lisa
14. Johanna
15. Nele / Neele
16. Julia
17. Angelina
18. Sofia / Sophia
19. Maja / Maya
20. Sophie / Sofie
21. Amelie / Amely
22. Chiara / Kiara
23. Leni / Lenie
24. Louisa / Luisa
25. Alina

Boys
1. Leon
2. Lukas / Lucas
3. Finn / Fynn
4. Jonas
5. Paul
6. Tim / Timm
7. Luca / Luka
8. Niclas / Niklas
9. Max
10. Felix
11. Maximilian
12. Philipp / Philip / Phillip
13. Luis / Louis
14. Ben
15. Julian
16. Elias
17. Tom
18. David
19. Noah
20. Jan
21. Simon
22. Erik / Eric
23. Fabian
24. Justin
25. Nils / Niels

darthantares
Friday, October 27th, 2006, 05:07 AM
I have a surname from an early 19th century German immigrant in my tree that I am curious about. The surname was Baney but the consensus from many others researching that name is that it was an Anglicised spelling of Bohne (with an umlaut on the o) or Behny or something though those researchers are looking at lines that aren't connected to mine in the U.S. Ancestry.com's last name meanings states that it was south or Swiss German but I also see German surname maps generating clusters around lower saxony. The American born Baney's began marry Irish Catholic descended wives so I guess they probably were Catholic as well.

Dr. Solar Wolff
Friday, October 27th, 2006, 06:24 AM
Wow, that's interesting, I didn't know about the city/village thing. Thanks! and also about Warnke being north German.. I was pretty sure I was right about it, at least my grandmother is German so I'm sure she'd know about her own name, but I think my boyfriend just didn't want to admit I was right lol

Also I just looked this up, Other spelling variations include: Werner, Waerner, Warncke, Werneke, Warnke (Hamburg)

My grandmother is from a small town near Hamburg

One side of my family were named Warner. Isn't this English?

darthantares
Friday, October 27th, 2006, 06:33 AM
Could be English or German. What about Albert Warner of Warner Brothers? j/k ;)

Berliners Remember
Friday, October 27th, 2006, 07:46 AM
Warner is most likley German. I have a friend with the last name of Warner and her grandmother is from Germany.

Teutonic
Friday, October 27th, 2006, 07:53 PM
any info on my name, someone from Deutschland told me it translates into adelig. HOFFART, my mothers surname SATTLER i know their both german but i would like to know where they come from for sure. thank you

Stainawarijaz
Saturday, October 28th, 2006, 07:16 PM
Schulz - German: status name for a village headman, from a contracted form of Middle High German schultheize. The term originally denoted a man responsible for collecting dues and paying them to the lord of the manor; it is a compound of sculd(a) ‘debt’, ‘due’ + a derivative of heiz(z)an ‘to command’. The surname is also established in Scandinavia.


We do have quite a few German surnames that came along with the German immigration of the later medieval era, but that doesn't make them indigenously Scandinavian. And that particular name (Schulz) I have never heard in Sweden.

Zyklop
Sunday, October 29th, 2006, 07:17 PM
Warner is most likley German. I have a friend with the last name of Warner and her grandmother is from Germany.One usually doesn´t inherit the family name of one´s grandmother as far as I know. :bconfused
Could be an anglicized version of German 'Werner', though.


any info on my name, someone from Deutschland told me it translates into adelig. HOFFART, my mothers surname SATTLER i know their both german but i would like to know where they come from for sure. thank you

Anyone have any info on my last name "Vogel?"

Does anyone have any thoughts regarding the surname Bolle? My mother's family came/comes from Spandau-Berlin. I, unfortunately, have no other information.
http://www.ancestry.com/learn/facts/Fact.aspx?fid=10&ln=
http://christoph.stoepel.net/Geogen-localized-en.aspx

:oanieyes

Patrioten
Sunday, October 29th, 2006, 07:22 PM
We do have quite a few German surnames that came along with the German immigration of the later medieval era, but that doesn't make them indigenously Scandinavian. And that particular name (Schulz) I have never heard in Sweden.I had a teacher once with the surname Schulz. (but just to avoid getting the label dumbass stamped on me, i of course know that it is a german name and i'm not insinuating that it's scandinavian in origin).

Teutonic
Friday, December 15th, 2006, 01:07 AM
is the birth of German civilization, from Sweden? i have seen a lot of Swedes that share a lot of features of my family who are all of German heritage. i enjoy meeting people from Sweden and Norway, they are very good people.

Peoples Observer
Friday, December 15th, 2006, 11:00 AM
Can anyone on this forum from Germany tell me the origin of the names Keilmann and Kleinfeldt ? And perhaps which regions of Germany that these names predominate ?

It will be much appreciated.

Zyklop
Friday, December 15th, 2006, 11:59 AM
Can anyone on this forum from Germany tell me the origin of the names Keilmann and Kleinfeldt ? And perhaps which regions of Germany that these names predominate ?

It will be much appreciated.



http://www.ancestry.com/learn/facts/Fact.aspx?fid=10&ln=
http://christoph.stoepel.net/Geogen-localized-en.aspx

:oanieyes:oanieyes

laurent
Thursday, February 8th, 2007, 09:24 PM
someone have some info about Reinbolt,Roeckel and Prestenbach names

SwordOfTheVistula
Monday, September 10th, 2007, 06:39 AM
Generally I've found that German names often end in -er or consonant-consonant-e

Drakkar
Monday, September 10th, 2007, 06:50 AM
Notice the Petersen and Hansen in the northern region. My name's not in there.. I guess my family is special.

mischak
Monday, September 10th, 2007, 07:09 AM
Notice the Petersen and Hansen in the northern region. My name's not in there.. I guess my family is special.

Mine either.. seeing as I have a British surname :rolleyes:


My grandma's maiden name is Warnke and she said it's pretty common in northern Germany and especially around Hamburg (which is where she's from)

SwordOfTheVistula
Monday, September 10th, 2007, 07:16 AM
Notice the Petersen and Hansen in the northern region. My name's not in there.. I guess my family is special.

Yeah, at one time that area was occupied by Denmark, I guess that is why they have Danish style names there

theTasmanian
Monday, September 10th, 2007, 10:22 AM
i dont see my Grand mothers maiden name Bracker.....so maybe they are special too:D

Drakkar
Tuesday, September 11th, 2007, 09:09 AM
Well, the surname originated in Switzerland (relatives say so at least). I think they moved north to Elsaß after it was taken by Germany and then went to America a few generations later. Not a whole lot of people have the name, but it's still listed pretty commonly in German phone books. It's sometimes mistaken for English because it's looks latinized.

Jäger
Tuesday, September 11th, 2007, 09:26 AM
Generally I've found that German names often end in -er or consonant-consonant-e
-er is male -e is female for many nouns.

Anyway, so many Müllers :D

theTasmanian
Tuesday, September 11th, 2007, 09:44 AM
Well, the surname originated in Switzerland (relatives say so at least). I think they moved north to Elsaß after it was taken by Germany and then went to America a few generations later. Not a whole lot of people have the name, but it's still listed pretty commonly in German phone books. It's sometimes mistaken for English because it's looks latinized.

if thats in reference to my post?

i found on a thread some were here it was from both Switzerland and denmark? and its still fairly common in Germany...

Oswiu
Sunday, October 21st, 2007, 01:43 PM
Quite interesting to translate them. It seems that they're exactly the same as the most common English surnames. Unsurprising, I suppose! Anyone care to help with the harder ones?
Schneider - Taylor?
Meyer - ??Major?? (but what does that mean?)
Wagner - Carter
Schulz - ??Shield??
Hoffman - ??Farmer of some description??
Schaefer - a 'shaper' of some sort? Craftsman? Carpenter?
Bauer - Farmer??
Richter - ??Wright - i.e. a craftsman of some description??
Schroeder - ??Something agricultural like shredding stuff:P??
Zimmerman - ??Room man?? Eh??
Krueger - ??Warrior from Krieg??
Werner - ???? Krause? Lehmann?
Walter - Walter? = ??
Huber?
Moeller - Mueller???
Hahn - ??? Bird?
Guenther - familiar enough but what's the origin?
Keller - Cellar-er??
Schubert? Roth?
Beck - Beck, as in small stream?
Winkler ??Surely not a man who collect winkles (small sea snails)??
Boehm - from Bohemia? Are there really so many people whose ancestors came from there (and if tendencies are the same as in England, very few of these people will have actually lived in that land up till 1945, as geographical names are mostly only given to outsiders who've moved FROM an area)
Schuster? Kraus?
Otto - same as for Guenther
Kraemer? ??Dairy owners??
Vogt?
Brandt - Brand?? = what?
Haas? Seidel? Schulte? Ziegler? Kuehn? Pohl?
Sauer - ?pig farmer?
Beyer?
Huebner? Variant of Hueber?
Lindner? Goetz? Seifert?
Wenzel - ??Wenceslas < Vaclav = Vyacheslav = Highest Glory??
Barth??

Soten
Monday, October 22nd, 2007, 03:14 AM
I'm fairly certain that Schaefer means "shepherd" from German "Schaf" meaning "sheep".

Dr. Solar Wolff
Monday, October 22nd, 2007, 07:22 AM
Going through Zyklop's list of names, it is amazing how many are also common in America and how many people I know who have these names. There are occupational names in England but do they really have any relation to their German translations? There may be more names reflecting place of origin in England than in Germany.

Viriathus
Tuesday, October 23rd, 2007, 06:24 AM
Quite interesting to translate them. It seems that they're exactly the same as the most common English surnames. Unsurprising, I suppose! Anyone care to help with the harder ones?


Sure, i did it with a little help from the net.
Everyone feel free for corrections please and sorry if my translations are not accurate ;-)

Schneider - The Taylor.
Meyer - The "Meyer" was originally the "major villae" or "villicus". That was the delegate of a noble or a religious landlord, which managed the property yard.
Variations: Mayer, Meyer, Meier, Mair, Meir.
Wagner - A "Wagner" is a almost extinct profession. It is a wagon and wheel manufacturer.
The word have its origins in the Medium High German word "wagener" and the Old High German "waganâri".
Schulz - A derivation of the name Schultheiss."Schult/schuld = guilt" and "heiss = call". Someone that designates the debt. The "Schulze" was comparable with a village policeman, who belonged to the conditions of the farmers. It supervised the work of the farmers, collected the taxes for the landlord and announced to him any contravention.
Variations: Schulte, Scholz, Schultes, Schultess...
Hoffman - From Middle High German word "hoveman". It means a man who was a servant at the sovereigns court (Hof) or a farmer who lived in a homestead.
Schaefer - The Shepherd.
Bauer - The Farmer.
Richter - The Judge.
Schroeder - There are two definitions. It was a Taylor with the origin in the Low German word "schrôden" which means cutting or it can have the origin from the extinct profession of the "Schroeter". The man who carry barrels of wine into a ship, a cellar etc.
Zimmerman - The Carpenter.
Krueger - A Innkeeper. A "Krug" is the Low German word for a inn.
Krause - Again two definitions here.
1. From the Middle High German word "krûs" which mean curled, undulating Hair. A man with "krauses Haar".
2. In Pomerania dialects, "Kraus" means jug. The name carrier was originally a manufacturer of jugs.
Variations: Kraus, Kruse, Krauss...
Lehmann - Lehmann is derived from "Lehnsmann". A liege man and stands for someone, which got something lent, for example a piece of land.
Wernher - From the Old High German words „weri“ (fend) and „heri“ (army, troop). A resistent warrior or someone who belongs to the germanic tribe of the "Warnen".
Walther - From the Old High German words „Waltan“ (to reign, preside) and „heri“ (army, troop).
Huber - A farmer that had a whole "Hube", a old word for a square measure.
Variations: Huebner, Hueber, Huemer, Haumer...
Moeller - The Miller.
Variations: Müller, Müllner, Mühlmann, Moller...
Hahn - It means rooster. Maybe the name carrier was proud like a rooster.
Guenther - From the Old High German words „Gund“ (fight, battle) and again as we see above „heri“ (army, troop).
Variations: Günter, Gunnar, Gunter...
Keller - Shortform of the "Kellermeister" (the cellarmaster). A winemaker in a convent for example.
Schubert - From the Middle High German word "schuochwürchte" - the shoemaker.
Roth - Roth can be a sobriquet, which stands for the characteristic of the color red.
Beck - A variation of the name Becker. It can have its origin from the word "Bäcker" (the baker) or it describes a person who lived near a beck.
Winkler - A person who lived at a corner or maybe a chandler, from the german word "(bei)winken" - to beckon for somenone.
Boehm - Its seems to just mean "from Bohemia".
Schuster - The Shoemaker.
Otto - From the Old High German word "Ot" wich means property or heritage.
Kraemer - The Chandler.
Vogt - A (noble) functionary or custodian in the middle age.
Variations: Voigt, Voight, Vogts, Voit...
Brandt - Derivation of "Hildebrandt". It is partly also a origin or a dwelling name. This can be derived from a fire place, due to a slash and burn.
Variations: Brant, Brandl, Brand...
Haas - Derivation of the "Hase" = the Hare. Middle High German sobriquet for "coward" also for a fast, good hearing or for a quaint, foolish person.
Variations: Hase, Haase...
Ziegler - The name of a profession. A "Ziegler" is somebody that made bricks (Ziegeln).
Kuehn - A shortform of "Konrad" or also a derivation from Middle High German "küen" wich means "audacious, bold ".
Variations: Kuhn, Kienle, Kühnle...
Pohl - The origin of the surname Pohl can be deduced from several sources:
1. From the Low German Word niederdeutschen "Puhl" or english "pool" respectively High German "Pfuhl". Those which lived in such dwellings (with water filled slots).
2. Who trade with Poland or came from there.
3. Coming from the Town of Pohl.
4. Possible also the descendant of Paul (forename).
Sauer - The name "Sauer" means in English "Sour" and has two different origins:
1. A sobriquet of the sour, bitter, bad, grim kind of nature originally of in such a way designated humans referred.
2. A dwelling name referring to the southern situation of it (derived from Middle Low German word "sur").
Beyer - "from Bavaria"
Variations: Beier, Baier...
Lindner - Some definitions:
1. It refers to someone from the Town of Linden.
2. "Linde" is the german word for the lime tree. So it can be the name of somebody who lives near this tree.
3. A man who speaks the justice. The village lime tree functioned as court place. The holy tree of the Germanic goddess Freya was the lime. It is the tree of the truth, so the asked ones said the truth under the lime tree rather. So the "Lindner" can also been seen as a jugde.
Goetz - „Götz“ is a shortform of the name "Gottfried". In Old High German "got-fridu" = God + peace, protection.
Seifert - A variation of the name "Siegfried". In Old High German "sigu-fridu" = Victory + peace.
Variations: Seiffert, Seiffarth, Seifhardt, Sievert, Sievers, Seidel, Sarfarth.
Wenzel - Derived from the Czech calling name "Venceslav" (Wentzlaff/Wenceslaw).
Barth - Three definitions:
1. Sobriquet reffering to the (noticeable) beard of the person.
2. Coming from the Town of Barth - somebody from Barth is a "Bart(h)mann".
3. Shortform of Bartholomew

Sybra
Friday, October 26th, 2007, 04:53 PM
I am not quite sure with your translation of Meyer, Meier etc.
Might be you are right, but as many german names relate to professions i could imagine another translation.
A "Meierei" was a place where dairy products were processed. So Meier also could be the owner of this place.

Viriathus
Friday, October 26th, 2007, 05:27 PM
Yep, i know what you mean. I also thought that the name "Meyer" came from the word "Meierei" engl. dairy. But during my researches i only found the posted definition. So i don&#180;t had a evidence for the another signification.

Der Name Meyer (http://www.winmeyer.de/meyer.htm)
Wikipedia - Meier (http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meier_&#37;28Name%29)

alethea
Wednesday, April 1st, 2009, 08:51 PM
Hi
Is his list in any particular order...if it is it explains why the difficulties I have had searching for Muller Miller Mueller ancestors.

Illmatic
Friday, November 5th, 2010, 12:12 PM
Hello

My name is Michael an i have searched high and low for some historical information for my last name, to no avail i was hoping somebody here would be able to help me out

my surname is Poltermann

thank you anyone for your help

Andrew man
Friday, November 5th, 2010, 01:41 PM
My family was from the Nord-Rhein-Westphalia. I won't say exactly where but their name was "Dilberger". Very uncommon. I can't even find a meaning. Can someone help me? :)