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View Full Version : What Is Your Favorite Food Unique to Your Region/Country?



svartabrandr
Tuesday, August 24th, 2004, 01:34 AM
I am personally quite fond of the poutine. I am not entirely certain whether it is unique to Canada at this point but I don’t think its well know in other countries. The poutine is a fairly new food that was created in Quebec by accident about 40 years ago. A poutine is simply fries with cheese curds and gravy (which melts the cheese).



http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v330/svartabrandr/poutine.jpg

Taras Bulba
Tuesday, August 24th, 2004, 01:37 AM
Hmmmn.......well theres pierogies, borsch, meat-dumblings(pliyami I believe), and so on. I'll post them as soon as they come to my mind.

Stríbog
Tuesday, August 24th, 2004, 02:08 AM
Is it pliyami in Ukrainian? It's пельмени (pyelmeni) in Russian.

Triglav
Tuesday, August 24th, 2004, 02:25 AM
Potica. Yum, yum... :)

http://www.kljukec.com/slike/potica1.jpg


http://www.mlinopek.si/izdelki/potice.jpg

http://www.uvi.si/eng/slovenia/photos/ethnology/108/

Anne14
Tuesday, August 24th, 2004, 02:36 AM
I couldn't live without Philly Cheese Steaks and soft pretzels, mmmmmm!

Evolved
Tuesday, August 24th, 2004, 03:35 AM
Vernor's Ginger Ale (http://www.angelfire.com/tn/traderz/vernors.html) & Detroit Coney Dog (hotdog with chili, yellow mustard & onions).

http://www.fortwaynegrocery.com/dbphotos/7143400081CF.GIF & http://www.gilliesconeyisland.com/sitebuildercontent/sitebuilderpictures/Coney.jpg

For your health, consume both in moderation. 'Coney Island (http://www.jankaulins.com/p40.html)' is the generic name for the numerous Greek-owned diners in Michigan, many of which are open 24 hours.

Theudanaz
Tuesday, August 24th, 2004, 03:38 AM
Poutine reminds me of Dutch and Belgian food (frites) with all manner of stoofvlees, kaas, frietzaus, ketjapzaus, curryzaus, etc. etc. Surely unhealthy, thought perhaps tantalizing...

I don't know that Southern California can be said to be the home of anything particularly delightful in the way of food. To be sure, it has witnessed the birth of a variety of mongrelizations (and not only in the alimentary sense...) and corruptions of a finer European inheritance, not to mention plainly stupid and harmful creations. "Mexican" abounds, is cheap and dubious in its nutritive power. Of much greater worth from the chefs of this region I find the so-called "California" cuisine with its preference for grilling rather than frying and its abundance of good, fresh fruits and vegetables a significant improvement and good influence over other cuisines. Still, most of what is good here is probably owing much to the Mediterranean.

I prefer to look to my Danish relatives' recipes for inspiration. Nothing here makes me so pleased as smørrebrød, rød grød med fløde, hakkebøf, etc. Great traditions of great age and time-tested value.

Dr. Solar Wolff
Tuesday, August 24th, 2004, 04:00 AM
Poutine reminds me of Dutch and Belgian food (frites) with all manner of stoofvlees, kaas, frietzaus, ketjapzaus, curryzaus, etc. etc. Surely unhealthy, thought perhaps tantalizing...

I don't know that Southern California can be said to be the home of anything particularly delightful in the way of food. To be sure, it has witnessed the birth of a variety of mongrelizations (and not only in the alimentary sense...) and corruptions of a finer European inheritance, not to mention plainly stupid and harmful creations. "Mexican" abounds, is cheap and dubious in its nutritive power. Of much greater worth from the chefs of this region I find the so-called "California" cuisine with its preference for grilling rather than frying and its abundance of good, fresh fruits and vegetables a significant improvement and good influence over other cuisines. Still, most of what is good here is probably owing much to the Mediterranean.

I prefer to look to my Danish relatives' recipes for inspiration. Nothing here makes me so pleased as smørrebrød, rød grød med fløde, hakkebøf, etc. Great traditions of great age and time-tested value.

Southern California has refined Mexican food. If you have ever been to Southern California, you know we cannot live without Mexican food at least twice a week. Since the money is in California, not Mexico, all the really good cooks have come here and gotten jobs at the top Mexican restaurants. But they didn't stop there. The continued to create new dishes and refine and improve old ones until we have the best Mexican food in the world.

If you don't believe me, order Mexican food in Mexico and compare. Mexico does have good food, though. They have fresh vegies and meat without additives. Their seafood is excellent. They have the best coffee I have ever tasted. But their "Mexican food" isn't worth ordering.

Stríbog
Tuesday, August 24th, 2004, 04:55 AM
Since the money is in California, not Mexico, all the really good cooks have come here and gotten jobs at the top Mexican restaurants. But they didn't stop there. The continued to create new dishes and refine and improve old ones until we have the best Mexican food in the world.

I hear this is true of Indian food in London, for precisely the same reasons.

Anyway, my favorite "American" foods would have to be:

- bacon cheeseburgers with strawberry milkshakes
- buttermilk biscuits with molasses and sugar-cured ham
- hush puppies

Vojvoda
Tuesday, August 24th, 2004, 05:09 AM
cvarci (pork cracklings) and beer

Telperion
Tuesday, August 24th, 2004, 05:12 AM
The poutine is a fairly new food that was created in Quebec by accident about 40 years ago. A poutine is simply fries with cheese curds and gravy (which melts the cheese).
Preferably consumed with beer and chasers of Alcool.

Stríbog
Tuesday, August 24th, 2004, 05:19 AM
cvarci (pork cracklings) and beer

LOL you guys eat pork cracklings too? You sho' am monteniggahs! :D

Vojvoda
Tuesday, August 24th, 2004, 05:39 AM
LOL you guys eat pork cracklings too? You sho' am monteniggahs! :D
LOL,not the kind that you buy in a bag at the grocery store.Homemade,y'know what am sayin' ? :D

rusalka
Tuesday, August 24th, 2004, 05:57 AM
Is it pliyami in Ukrainian? It's пельмени (pyelmeni) in Russian.
It's Pelmeni in Ukrainian too. And Serbian, I think.

My favorite "regional" food, since I'm in New York City, would be chocolate egg cream. I believe it's properly New Yorker, even Brooklynite. The cheesecake isn't bad either.

As for ethnic foods, hard to decide, I have so many favorites but feta cheese, Circassian "ravioli" (pretty much the same thing as Kuban style vareniki), pashte (corn bread), adjika (a paste made of walnut, very hot chilli peppers, pepper paste, garlic, ahusha, asipra, arahana and salt), potoplika (not sure of this one's spelling, it's supposed to be Serbian), kumpir and bean soup with dumplings (bablyves?).

Stríbog
Tuesday, August 24th, 2004, 06:03 AM
LOL,not the kind that you buy in a bag at the grocery store.Homemade,y'know what am sayin' ? :D

Those are pork rinds. You're confusing your American ethnic foods. ;)

Stríbog
Tuesday, August 24th, 2004, 06:05 AM
As for ethnic foods, hard to decide, I have so many favorites but feta cheese, Circassian "ravioli" (pretty much the same thing as Kuban style vareniki), pashte (corn bread), adjika (a paste made of walnut, very hot chilli peppers, pepper paste, garlic, ahusha, asipra, arahana and salt), potoplika (not sure of this one's spelling, it's supposed to be Serbian), kumpir and bean soup with dumplings (bablyves?).

I can't find foods like that around here, at least not that I know of. Maybe I should go to the Turkish store and ask the owner if he makes them? :)

Vojvoda
Tuesday, August 24th, 2004, 06:05 AM
Those are pork rinds. You're confusing your American ethnic foods. ;) Ah yes,I wasn't sure how it was called in English.Thank you for correcting me.

Stríbog
Tuesday, August 24th, 2004, 06:19 AM
Yes, American pork consumption has led to a plethora of treats from the swine. In addition to the usual bacon, ham, sausage, chops, ribs and roasts, we have cracklings, chitterlings, sowbelly, fatback, neck, brains, headcheese, knuckles and feet, jowls, and hocks. :)

AngryPotato
Tuesday, August 24th, 2004, 06:43 AM
I wouldn't call it unique any longer...

The hamburger was born here in America and straining hearts ever since:
http://louislunch.com/

Food? Maybe, but the evil Pez corporation also exists here now.
Do they have these things in Europe?!? Little character dispensers that spit sugar tabs into the mouths of fat fingered American children.

http://www.amoju.com/image/pez/f_glowPez.jpg

How about Pizza? Unique no longer, but also created in my city along with hamburgers and the world has never been lean since.

http://www.yaleherald.com/archive/frosh/2000/blue/p51pizza.html

I can't think of any specific foods that are only eaten in abundance locally.

Freya78
Tuesday, August 24th, 2004, 07:05 AM
http://www.mack-online.de/images/Grusskarten/G_Spargelgericht.gif

Mmmmmhhhh .... ;-)

Taht`s my favorite Food .


Do they have these things in Europe?!? Little character dispensers that spit sugar tabs into the mouths of fat fingered American children.Yes , in Germany the Kids like PEZ .
http://www.snopes.com/history/graphics/pez.jpg

Stríbog
Tuesday, August 24th, 2004, 07:17 AM
I can't think of any specific foods that are only eaten in abundance locally.

Quahog clams? :)

Esther_Helena
Tuesday, August 24th, 2004, 08:43 AM
Hmm... favorit foods... Well, these aren't my favorite, but I do like them a lot.
I don't know if these are 100% unique to my location, but they're close enough to it. :P
Grits (w/ salt and pepper, and butter, and maybe cheese)
Fried Okra
Collard/Turnip greens (w/ apple cider vinegar)
Pork Rinds - salt and vinegar only. (Hard as hell to find)
Sweet Iced Tea
Pepsi - maybe not unique to my state, but it originated there.
Cornbread
(I'll add more)

Willowsprout
Tuesday, August 24th, 2004, 09:04 AM
It's from Iceland I grew up (in America) eating it on special occasions: hardfiskur (dried fish) and panakukur (like a crepe). I think all of Scandinavia has similar foods.

Gesta Bellica
Tuesday, August 24th, 2004, 10:34 AM
]

How about Pizza? Unique no longer, but also created in my city along with hamburgers and the world has never been lean since.

http://www.yaleherald.com/archive/frosh/2000/blue/p51pizza.html


You are talking about American Pizza, i assume :)

Here in my county we have some special food..expecially homemade cheese that cannot be found elsewhere in Italy (and i guess in the world)
We have also our local variants of Pasta and porch derivates (hmm, i don't know how do u call Ham and stuff like this)

European_angel
Tuesday, August 24th, 2004, 11:53 AM
Not unique to my part of the world, but I live in a fishing community and we are famous for the best seafood around. I like the battered haddock and chips (fries). Another thing my grandparents grew up on, which I am not sure if they are made elsewhere, but this is the only place I've heard of them at, are doughboys and blueberry grunt--both delicious!

marina
Tuesday, August 24th, 2004, 01:55 PM
in my opinion the best food in spain is "jamon de jabugo".... yeaaaaaa, it's sort of unbaked ham, from the pig....

bocian
Tuesday, August 24th, 2004, 02:23 PM
cvarci (pork cracklings) and beer

Ah yes, Skwarki and Piwo, the best is chleb ze smalcem i skwarkami - Polish rye bread with lard and pork cracklings (greaves?) .

Goes so well with beer. :)

Here are some of my favorite Polish dishes:

bigos - hunters stew
flaki - tripe soup
golabki - cabbage rolls
golonka - pork hocks
pierogi either with cheese and potato (Ruskie) or with cabbage and mushrooms.

Soups:
zupa szczawiowa - sorrel soup
Barszcz - beet soup
zurek - sour rye soup

Kohler
Tuesday, August 24th, 2004, 02:40 PM
"La paella", without a doubt.

http://www.infocostablanca.com/1images/paella.jpg

Looks good, eh? ;)

Drei_Liter
Tuesday, August 24th, 2004, 02:47 PM
My absoloute favourite:

http://tennis.blau-weiss-hand.de/db_Haxe1.jpg

marina
Tuesday, August 24th, 2004, 03:01 PM
http://www.mack-online.de/images/Grusskarten/G_Spargelgericht.gif

Mmmmmhhhh .... ;-)

Taht`s my favorite Food .

Yes , in Germany the Kids like PEZ .
http://www.snopes.com/history/graphics/pez.jpg
in my opinion, i love paella, and tortilla de patatas( spanish food )

Lord Wind
Tuesday, August 24th, 2004, 04:33 PM
My favorite food from switzerland is called "Röschti". :) That is gratered, fried potatoes, and usually eaten with meat and sauce.

Mac Seafraidh
Tuesday, August 24th, 2004, 05:29 PM
My favorite desert is probably "Cannoli."

http://www.northendboston.com/bovabakery/art/cannoli.jpg


"Leave the gun. Take the cannoli." Clemenza to Rocco



I used to love German food, but when I became Pisco-Vegetarian, that pretty much defeats it. So my favorite food is Sicilian and Greek.

Phlegethon
Wednesday, August 25th, 2004, 12:04 AM
Potica. Yum, yum... :)
Sieht aus wie stinknormaler Baumkuchen. ;)

Phlegethon
Wednesday, August 25th, 2004, 12:12 AM
Well, where I live it is


http://www.wummesworld.mynetcologne.de/Currywurst.JPG

and

http://www.koenig-brauerei.com/i/_glas.jpg

Currywurst and Köpi - the ambrosia of the working class. ;)

Phlegethon
Wednesday, August 25th, 2004, 12:20 AM
OK, here is something healthier. Apart from asparagus in all variations (which Freya78 already mentioned) Westphalians still have their


Grünkohl mit Pinkel

http://www.standort-dortmund.de/dortmunder-kochbuch/gruenkohl_mit_pinkel.jpg

Too bad that this pic does not show the original combination, but you'll get an idea.

rusalka
Wednesday, August 25th, 2004, 12:33 AM
It's always those horrible sausages you eat baby. It'll be the death of you if I don't get to you first. ;)

Phlegethon
Wednesday, August 25th, 2004, 12:38 AM
It's a man's world, full of phallic symbols. ;)

rusalka
Wednesday, August 25th, 2004, 12:40 AM
It's a man's world, full of phallic symbols. ;)
I thought they were for us to use, not you. Did you get a little too Hellenophile? ;)

ogenoct
Wednesday, August 25th, 2004, 12:45 AM
in Louisiana:

http://members.cox.net/slewfoot/jamtitle.jpg

Phlegethon
Wednesday, August 25th, 2004, 12:50 AM
It's a display of wisdom and power. Women wouldn't understand. ;)

Stríbog
Wednesday, August 25th, 2004, 12:53 AM
OK, here is something healthier. Apart from asparagus in all variations (which Freya78 already mentioned) Westphalians still have their


Grünkohl mit Pinkel



Doesn't pinkeln mean to urinate?

Phlegethon
Wednesday, August 25th, 2004, 01:00 AM
Yes, and pinkeln is low German for "to drip". The sausage probably has its name because it was hung from the ceiling and left to drip.

http://www.lexikon-definition.de/Pinkelwurst.html

rusalka
Wednesday, August 25th, 2004, 01:57 AM
I can't find foods like that around here, at least not that I know of. Maybe I should go to the Turkish store and ask the owner if he makes them? :) Ah, I had missed this post because of all those sausages Phleg loves to post! :P

Stribog, except for the feta cheese it's hardly unlikely that you could find any of those in a Turkish store. Western Turkish cuisine is almost identical to Greek cuisine, feta cheese, dolmades, tzatziki, spinach pie and all sorts of olive oil dishes etc. But Adjika for example, is a Circassian food (well for me it is, I see now that it's popular in Russia all around). It's not even a seperate dish, it's something that is put into almost every dish but it's also eaten at breakfast as a spread. I don't know where you live but here I actually found it in Russian groceries at Brighton Beach. Circassian lands are officially in Russia of course, so I guess you might get it from a Russian store. In fact, I just checked it and here it is:

http://www.russianfoods.com/showroom/product012F3/vendor003E7/default.asp

and:

http://www.russianfoods.com/showroom/product012EA/pimages/110A001.jpg

Other than that, pashte and the "ravioli" I mentioned are also Circassian dishes and not Turkish. You can't find the vareniki (ravioli) in a store, of course and pashte is basically corn bread.

Potoplika is, as far as I know, a Serbian dish since my grandmother makes it. It's a sort of a pie made with thin dough and potatoes for me (cause I don't eat meat) and usually with chicken or minced meat. Kumpir is also a Balkan dish, it's baked potatoes.

Nordhammer
Wednesday, August 25th, 2004, 02:42 AM
I hear this is true of Indian food in London, for precisely the same reasons.

Anyway, my favorite "American" foods would have to be:

- bacon cheeseburgers with strawberry milkshakes
- buttermilk biscuits with molasses and sugar-cured ham
- hush puppies

I know a Southerner when I see one. ;)

Nordhammer
Wednesday, August 25th, 2004, 02:44 AM
LOL,not the kind that you buy in a bag at the grocery store.Homemade,y'know what am sayin' ? :D

Do you guys eat pickled pig's feet too? :D

Nordhammer
Wednesday, August 25th, 2004, 02:48 AM
Hmm... favorit foods... Well, these aren't my favorite, but I do like them a lot.
I don't know if these are 100% unique to my location, but they're close enough to it. :P
Grits (w/ salt and pepper, and butter, and maybe cheese)
Fried Okra
Collard/Turnip greens (w/ apple cider vinegar)
Pork Rinds - salt and vinegar only. (Hard as hell to find)
Sweet Iced Tea
Pepsi - maybe not unique to my state, but it originated there.
Cornbread
(I'll add more)

Another Southerner without a doubt. ;)

Krampus
Wednesday, August 25th, 2004, 03:11 AM
This is difficult, but a few of my favorite Midwest US treats are:

Headcheese, yes I know it's scrambled pig's brains cooked and chilled, but it taste pretty good with cut sweet onions on top.

Fried Smelt from Lake Michigan! Catch them off the shore, take them home and fry them up. Most restaurants here have them as well, often they are fished commercially from the Great Lakes anyway.

Fried Walleye, a Perch with sharp teeth, best tasting fish in my opinion.

bocian
Wednesday, August 25th, 2004, 03:18 AM
This is difficult, but a few of my favorite Midwest US treats are:

Headcheese, yes I know it's scrambled pig's brains cooked and chilled, but it taste pretty good with cut sweet onions on top.

Fried Smelt from Lake Michigan! Catch them off the shore, take them home and fry them up. Most restaurants here have them as well, often they are fished commercially from the Great Lakes anyway.

Fried Walleye, a Perch with sharp teeth, best tasting fish in my opinion.

I have never eaten pig brain but I've heard it's quite yummy. Lamb brains are delicious.

Walleye and Perch are both from the same family of fish and I agree they are the tastiest freshwater fish to eat.

Theudanaz
Wednesday, August 25th, 2004, 03:21 AM
Southern California has refined Mexican food. If you have ever been to Southern California, you know we cannot live without Mexican food at least twice a week. Since the money is in California, not Mexico, all the really good cooks have come here and gotten jobs at the top Mexican restaurants. But they didn't stop there. The continued to create new dishes and refine and improve old ones until we have the best Mexican food in the world.

If you don't believe me, order Mexican food in Mexico and compare. Mexico does have good food, though. They have fresh vegies and meat without additives. Their seafood is excellent. They have the best coffee I have ever tasted. But their "Mexican food" isn't worth ordering.

You're probably right, Dr. Wolff. Though I find the products of the amateur cooks at the taquerias (taco stands) more savory than the large, overpriced "bars & grills" such as Acapulco's, El Torito, etc.

However I am now studying in San Fran"sick"o, which has many fine qualities such as the weather, the vistas, music venues, etc.; and I would comment on one local favorite that I thoroughly enjoy here: white clam chowder in a breadbowl, washed down with an Anchor steam beer. Go to the right soup counter on the Wharf, where the clams are caught and soup made fresh from them. I've had fresh it in New England too, but I think it's better here—it's certainly a different recipe. With a little tabasco sauce it's sublime. Also, there is a certain delicate cake made here in North Beach (the old Italian quarter), I've heard it's not known anywhere else — a sort of cake made with zabaglione cream, and you can only get it at Stella Pastry.

Ewergrin
Wednesday, August 25th, 2004, 03:45 AM
Those are pork rinds. You're confusing your American ethnic foods. ;)

Here, both pork rinds and cracklings come sold in a bag in most convienant stores. Cracklings, however, are much better when fresh.

Stríbog
Wednesday, August 25th, 2004, 05:25 AM
This is difficult, but a few of my favorite Midwest US treats are:

Headcheese, yes I know it's scrambled pig's brains cooked and chilled, but it taste pretty good with cut sweet onions on top.

Fried Smelt from Lake Michigan! Catch them off the shore, take them home and fry them up. Most restaurants here have them as well, often they are fished commercially from the Great Lakes anyway.

Fried Walleye, a Perch with sharp teeth, best tasting fish in my opinion.

Pork brains are also good when scrambled with eggs.

I very rarely eat fish out of the Great Lakes because of the pollution. Walleye can be better or worse than perch depending on diet, IMO. The ones from the far North that eat "natural" baitfish like ciscos probably taste better than the ones in stocked lakes further south that subsist on shad, for example. Walleye that primarily feed on perch probably taste better, too.
I didn't like the Great Lakes salmon that I had that much because most of them eat more alewives than smelt; the alewives bulk them up quickly but the meat lacks color and flavor. Salmon that live primarily on smelt taste better.

Lake trout is the best freshwater fish anyway. ;)

Nordhammer
Wednesday, August 25th, 2004, 01:36 PM
Pork brains are also good when scrambled with eggs.

I had that when I was a kid. I tried it again when I was older but I didn't care for it.

Taras Bulba
Wednesday, August 25th, 2004, 05:17 PM
Is it pliyami in Ukrainian? It's пельмени (pyelmeni) in Russian.

My mistake. This is one reason why I hate speaking in Russian in non-Cyrillic letters.

Telperion
Wednesday, August 25th, 2004, 11:19 PM
A favourite food which may not be much known outside of Canada is Strawberry-Rhubarb pie. The Rhubarb plant has a very large green leaf growing from a red stalk. The leaf is poisonous, but the stalk, when boiled, is extremely sweet and flavourful, and complements the taste of strawberries very well.

Your trivia for the day is that this flavour combination is sufficiently popular that McDonald's serves Strawberry-Rhubarb pie in Canada in place of the Strawberry-Rasperry-Blackberry pie they serve in their US outlets.

Phlegethon
Wednesday, August 25th, 2004, 11:26 PM
Everyone knows Rhubarb. But one does not have to boil the stalk. It is healthier to eat it fresh.

We still have Rhubarb in my grandmother's garden. Normally it's more than we can eat.

Telperion
Thursday, August 26th, 2004, 12:00 AM
Hmm, I didn't know it could be eaten fresh. I'll go uproot a stalk and see what I think of its flavour.

WarMaiden
Thursday, August 26th, 2004, 06:12 PM
Foods i can't live without are...

Sheperds (I make a kickass SP)

http://www.foodireland.com/recipes/meat/SHEPHARDSPIE.gif

Trifle...

http://www.nestle.co.uk/recipes/desserts/images/raspberry_image.jpg

I could go on and on....

WarMaiden
Thursday, August 26th, 2004, 06:13 PM
Everyone knows Rhubarb. But one does not have to boil the stalk. It is healthier to eat it fresh.

We still have Rhubarb in my grandmother's garden. Normally it's more than we can eat.
Yummy my nan used to make a kickass Rhubarb Pie!!!

Gesta Bellica
Thursday, August 26th, 2004, 06:18 PM
, there is a certain delicate cake made here in North Beach (the old Italian quarter), I've heard it's not known anywhere else — a sort of cake made with zabaglione cream, and you can only get it at Stella Pastry.

Interesting.. i might go and check if i can find it, when i'll be there on vacation :)

Jehan
Thursday, February 3rd, 2005, 04:17 AM
I can't believe all you canadian/quebecer people thought of was poutine. This is a shame, really. Well, at least in Québec, traditional food is so much better than this! There's the cipate(or cipaille, or tourtière, they're all a variation of the same thing, depending on the region) which is a kind of enormous paté with beef, pork, veal, deer, moose, and potatoes, with a kind of crust on top. Delightful. And there's also all the maple stuff! How can you forget about maple syrup?? There's also the "ragout de pattes de cochon" or if you prefer, the Pork leg stew ?(I'm not sure about this...)

The beer is also really good.

Appalachian
Thursday, February 3rd, 2005, 04:45 AM
Another Southerner without a doubt. ;)

What if I told you I occasionally like to crack into an RC Cola and a MoonPie?

http://www.varian.net/dreamweavn/dreamfeast/rc/rc-moonpie.gif

Oskorei
Thursday, February 3rd, 2005, 01:58 PM
Swedish meatballs, with mashed potatoes and lots of vegetables.

Odin Biggles
Thursday, February 3rd, 2005, 02:17 PM
Nice thread.

Here its now Curry, but it used to be Fish & Chips or a Sunday Roast (yorkshire puddings, veg, mash potato, beef usually & gravy).

I still have them.

Theobald
Sunday, March 20th, 2005, 11:18 PM
The Great Alsatian food :D :

The Kougelhoft

http://www.recettesdalsace.com/images/RE00057P.gif

The "choucroute" :

http://www.recettesdalsace.com/images/RE00032P.gif

The Baeckeoffe :


http://www.recettesdalsace.com/images/RE00027P.gif

Our wines (Sylvaner, Pinot Blanc, Riesling, Muscat, Tokay d'Alsace, Gewurtztraminer, Riesling, Klevener et Pinot Noir) :

http://nsrv.com/vins-d-alsace-herr/bouteilles.jpg

Our beer (the best ever seen :P) :

http://www.brasseries-kronenbourg.com/_corporate/marques/media/kronenbourg/b_kronenbourg.jpg