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Evolved
Tuesday, August 17th, 2004, 12:53 AM
Turner & Hooch (1989) (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0098536/)

Dancer in the Dark (2000) (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0168629/)

bocian
Tuesday, August 17th, 2004, 12:54 AM
Whale rider, 2002. :~(

Frans_Jozef
Tuesday, August 17th, 2004, 01:11 AM
Lassie come home.

Edward Scissorhands.

The Yearling.(http://us.imdb.com/title/tt0039111/).

The Elephant Man.

Tarka the Otter.(http://us.imdb.com/title/tt0079988/combined)

The Kid.(http://us.imdb.com/title/tt0012349/)

Grimr
Tuesday, August 17th, 2004, 02:28 AM
Elephant man
Cannibal Holocaust
Village of the damned

Sigrun Christianson
Tuesday, August 17th, 2004, 02:38 AM
The Elephant Man
Mask
The English patient
Babe
Casablanca

Awar
Tuesday, August 17th, 2004, 02:46 AM
Road Trip

Strengthandhonour
Tuesday, August 17th, 2004, 05:07 AM
Road Trip
I am guessing that is a joke :P
I almost cried when I saw Cast away and wilson dissapeared haha :)

Johannes de León
Tuesday, August 17th, 2004, 09:46 AM
Amadeus (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0086879/). :~(

Also Kung Pow (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0240468/), and all Monty Python (http://www.imdb.com/find?tt=on;nm=on;mx=20;q=monty%20python) 's movies, but for a different reason. :D

Gil
Tuesday, August 17th, 2004, 09:58 AM
American History X. Why??????!!!! :P
No, for real, never really cried during/after seeing movie but I got a little disturbed after watching both The Ring and The Passion of the Christ.

Cheers

Mistress Klaus
Tuesday, August 17th, 2004, 02:13 PM
Alot of animal/nature docu's & movies.

Mac Seafraidh
Tuesday, August 17th, 2004, 03:18 PM
Horrible movie out of the trilogy, but the best part perhaps. Kinda sad when Sofia Coppola dies at the end of The Godfather pt. III.:~(

Esther_Helena
Tuesday, August 17th, 2004, 04:05 PM
The Land Before Time. (I was about 5 or 6, gimme a break)
Gladiator - nothing beats PMS mood swings at 4 in the morning:P

Prussian
Tuesday, August 17th, 2004, 06:19 PM
There was a film I watched when I was around about 13 years old from memory, I cannot remember the name of it but it was a film based on a true story of a young teenage girl in rural america that was gang raped & violated by her male counterparts and the film ended with her jumping from the vehicle of the young men and her dying as a result.

For some reason it had a profound impact on me, it was not a big budget film or anything of the like just a story of a girl that was violated against her will and that really got to me & made me appalled at the behavior of some and how they do not respect an individual women's right to choose, frankly I found the behavior of the men simply disgusting and barbaric.;(

Phlegethon
Tuesday, August 17th, 2004, 06:51 PM
The daily news make me cry regularly. Reality beats fiction anytime.

Alkman
Wednesday, August 18th, 2004, 03:44 AM
"Spartakus" was the one,but i was very young,6-7 years old.
However,last time i cried was 8 years ago,when i was reading Ammianus Marcelinus history,the chapter about Julian's death.
I couldnt find an English translation,so for those who can read Latin: http://www.gmu.edu/departments/fld/CLASSICS/ammianus25.html#3
:~( :~( :~(

She-Wolf
Monday, September 20th, 2004, 10:04 PM
"Wolfen" on seing the real video footage of wolves being air shot :(
"The Fly 2" on the scene where the friendly dog is used as an experiment and becomes a sad mutated creature :(
"Watership Down" made me cry when I was 7 years old.
Lots of films with animal cruelty make me cry.

Siegmund
Tuesday, September 21st, 2004, 05:09 AM
Shining Through, when Gestapo agent Margrete Von Eberstein (Joely Richardson) was shot by the Jew Linda Voss (Melanie Griffith).

Nehaj
Tuesday, September 21st, 2004, 05:38 AM
Čudotvorni mač (Baš Čelik)

King Kong

For some reason, as a kid, I could not bear to see the villains lose.

outcastedshadow
Tuesday, September 21st, 2004, 06:32 AM
American Movie Braveheart. :~(

Milesian
Tuesday, September 21st, 2004, 11:03 AM
Charlotte's Web
E.T.

:D

Mistress Klaus
Tuesday, September 21st, 2004, 12:14 PM
Charlotte's Web
E.T.

:D

:D Yes I have been guilty of shedding a tear for E.T. (when the 'alien' ET was grey & dying). I felt really silly for getting emotional over a rubber prop. :D .It stirred deeper emotions about humanity..its greed & stupidity.

Milesian
Tuesday, September 21st, 2004, 02:35 PM
:D Yes I have been guilty of shedding a tear for E.T. (when the 'alien' ET was grey & dying). I felt really silly for getting emotional over a rubber prop. :D .It stirred deeper emotions about humanity..its greed & stupidity.

Well, I was only 4 y/old at the time ;)

Same goes for Charlotte's web actually. First and last time I cried over a dead spider :lol

Bestio
Tuesday, September 21st, 2004, 02:52 PM
I too dropped tears for ET , I was 5 or 6 , can remember my granma telling my mom to get out because she believed I was frightned by the alien , but I was just crying a bit , :~( , especially when surgeons were operating ET.

Frans_Jozef
Monday, January 31st, 2005, 01:01 AM
Babe.

Hoggett and Babe standing there immersed in a beam of light that could come from the Sun or some outer reaches. The crowd cheering wildly.
Hoggett turns his face beatified by a glowing halo to the pig, a smile at last smoothing his stern lips.
All his love and tenderness gushing in simple lines.
Babe sighing in relief, still awed and exhaust by his own tremendous achievement.


[/url]
[url="http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0001975/"]Narrator (http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0001975/): And though every single human in the stands or in the commentary boxes was at a complete loss for words, the man who in his life had uttered fewer words than any of them knew exactly what to say.
Farmer Hoggett (http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000342/): That'll do, pig. That'll do.

Frans_Jozef
Monday, January 31st, 2005, 01:16 AM
Everyday life does it for me.
Sometimes you get so lonely that it just make sense...the tears dry up, but the pain is still there, trickling its venom undisturbed as in a mute conspiracy deeper in the catacombs of the heart.:|

Anne14
Monday, January 31st, 2005, 07:15 AM
I just cried over a made for TV movie on Lifetime yesterday - Miracle Run.

Oskorei
Monday, January 31st, 2005, 08:12 PM
Babe.
I too "almost" shed tears during Babe. It is a very beautiful little film.

The Last Samurai, the scene where the Samurai are massacred by the soldiers of modernity, filled my eyes with tears as well.

Nordraserei
Monday, January 31st, 2005, 08:50 PM
Aww, it seems Oskorei and Frans_Jozef have soft sides to them. The movie Gone in 60 Seconds made me *almost* cry when that Shelby was destroyed. :P

Huzar
Monday, January 31st, 2005, 10:28 PM
EXCALIBUR (john boorman,1981) . Lancelot and king Arthur death.......

Odin Biggles
Tuesday, February 1st, 2005, 12:42 AM
Another one for Babe.

First time I watched it, didnt really feel anything for it.

It was shown on Christmas Eve here at around 3 or 4pm last year and it was all grey outside and I was all cozy inside in my back room on the sofa with a British Army Arctic Warfare coat on (don't ask) with the log fire roaring and my mother making Christmas dinner in the kitchen, generally just feeling a very "magical" time.

When the scene came on that Frans Jozef described I admit it did make me shed a tear, only film thats ever done that.

All about the location & time when seeing certain films ;).

Siegmund
Tuesday, February 1st, 2005, 01:01 AM
Most recently, Hero. What a code of honor these people shared, only to give their lives in the end. It moves me just to remember their nobility and self-sacrifice.

Another one I saw recently on DVD: Eye of the Beholder, unutterably sad because it portrays how easy it is to get caught in a web of problems from which there is no escape...

Tommy Vercetti
Tuesday, February 1st, 2005, 01:04 AM
Rambo - First blood

All his buddies died and he was ostracized by people... It was so sad

AngryPotato
Tuesday, February 1st, 2005, 03:42 AM
Watership Down - can't keep from tearing up to this day..its the ending

Empire of the Sun

Lidvick
Tuesday, February 1st, 2005, 04:21 AM
Attilla, Braveheart, The Messenger, Equilibrium,:~(

Lidvick
Tuesday, February 1st, 2005, 04:23 AM
Edward Scissors Hands :~( ( saw that on someone else saying that can not forget that one)

Lidvick
Tuesday, February 1st, 2005, 04:30 AM
You would think why I did not get all these movies I am thinking on one response lol yes I know bit annoying oh well.


Last Samurai and Hero also others I have cried and heard from other members.:D

Lena_rus
Tuesday, February 1st, 2005, 05:03 AM
The English Patient
Malena

:~( :~( :~( :D

Theudanaz
Tuesday, February 1st, 2005, 11:27 AM
The Mirror
The Virgin Spring
Winter Light
Russian Ark
Sans Soleil
The Emperor's Nightingale


these are some that made me cry, some for different reasons. but the tears were there. for interesting discussion on why people cry in front of artwork (esp. painting) see James Elkins' "Painting and Tears". the info could be extrapolated to include the other arts, i think.

BfA
Friday, February 11th, 2005, 05:44 AM
Brother Bear:-O

Fraxinus Excelsior
Friday, February 11th, 2005, 06:01 AM
Universal Soldier 2 was sad. :|

But, seriously, I almost cried during Babe (the scene in which Babe is separated from his/her mother).

Blutwölfin
Friday, February 11th, 2005, 11:55 AM
The Land Before Time
The Last Unicorn
Requiem For A Dream
Dead Poets Society
You've Got Mail
Forrest Gump
Mask (not M.A.S.K.!!)
The Green Mile
Steel Magnolias
Dying Young
and quite a lot (and embarassing movies) more. ;)

Theudiskaz
Thursday, March 16th, 2006, 05:09 AM
Braveheart, Forrest Gump, the Last Samurai, a documentary about wolves(can't remeber name) and numerous movies when I was a little kid.

Phlegethon
Thursday, March 16th, 2006, 11:11 AM
As a child:

Vittorio de Sica's "Ladri di biciclette" ("Bicycle Thieves") (Italy, 1948), a milestone of neorealism, based on a story by Luigi Bartolini.


http://images.amazon.com/images/P/6305081034.01.LZZZZZZZ.jpg



In post-World War II Italy poverty is a dire reality for a large portion of the population. Work is scarce and the opportunities for employment are few and far between. "Ladri Di Biciclette" (translated "The Bicycle Thief") is quietly one of the finest films ever produced. It follows one economically distraught man (Lamberto Maggiorani) who is heading down a desperate path fast. Things look up when he gets a job putting posters on walls in town, but he must sell what few meager possessions he and his family have to buy a bicycle to uphold his end of the business bargain. Naturally tragedy strikes immediately as the title character shows up the very first day Maggiorani is on the job. The police are little help, believing the bicycle is not as important as it really is. Thus Maggiorani and young son Enzo Staiola take it upon themselves to look all over town to try and find the bicycle and bring the thief to justice. "The Bicycle Thief" was originally released in 1948 and won an Honorary Academy Award for Best Foreign Language film the following year (the movie was not released in the U.S. until 1949). It is still a production that strikes deep even today. The lengths and desperate measures that some go through is very evident here. Director Vittorio De Sica crafts a film that is much deeper than it appears on the surface. It examines the human condition and questions society, family, law enforcement, alliances and mental anguish perfectly. "The Bicycle Thief" is an excellent production that has aged well and allows the viewer to think about many subjects that go beyond ordinary cinematic depths. 5 stars out of 5.

http://german.imdb.com/title/tt0040522/

Weg
Thursday, March 16th, 2006, 11:55 AM
I don't think I've ever wept like a floorcloth watching a movie. Boys don't cry. ;)

However...

Schindler's List
The Pianist

... and many other testimonies of suffering... :~(

Waarnemer
Thursday, March 16th, 2006, 01:18 PM
http://images.amazon.com/images/P/B0002YLCOM.01.LZZZZZZZ.jpg

;)

No, in the patriot you have a scene at the beach in which his youngest daughter cries; "daddy don't leave, ill say whatever you want" imo one of the most beautiful movie scenes i ever saw.

http://img156.imageshack.us/img156/6426/patriot9uu.th.jpg (http://img156.imageshack.us/my.php?image=patriot9uu.jpg)

Prince Eugen
Thursday, March 16th, 2006, 06:54 PM
Men don't cry:D However in Schidler's List i have tears from endless laughing:D

Weg
Thursday, March 16th, 2006, 07:13 PM
Men don't cry:D However in Schidler's List i have tears from endless laughing:D

I was completely shattered myself... :~(

Gorm the Old
Thursday, March 16th, 2006, 08:02 PM
Few films have ever been real enough to me to move me to tears. One which I found deeply moving enough to, though, is "The Hunchback of Notre Dame" with Lon Chaney, around 1925. It's a silent, of course, but as Gloria Swanson said, "We had faces, then." Ah, didn't they, though ? Another tear-jerker of the same period is "Greed" with Zasu Pitts, Gibson Gowland, and Jean Hersholt, 1923.

Perceval
Friday, March 17th, 2006, 04:16 AM
Gladiator
http://img220.imageshack.us/img220/5001/gladiator5kt.jpg (http://imageshack.us)

Kohistani
Friday, March 17th, 2006, 11:50 AM
I have never taken movies seriously. Instead what has once made me cry was a reading of the Book by Khalid Hosseini-The Kite Runner. The protagonist, though whom Hosseini narrates the story, left his land, where he had several obligations and a past-basically his roots. He lost them, that to me was the greatest sorrow for a man, because once out of one's roots, there isn't any life, a plant sticks to its roots in its lifetime, elsewhere it is firewood.

Thusnelda
Friday, March 17th, 2006, 02:19 PM
Titanic
The last unicorn
Watership down
Some kind of wonderful

Weg
Friday, March 17th, 2006, 03:12 PM
Titanic made me fall asleep... zzzzz :yawn

nordicdusk
Wednesday, May 3rd, 2006, 11:49 PM
What movies make the members of BuB cry and if there is any why is this.

Sigurd
Wednesday, May 3rd, 2006, 11:51 PM
Hmmm...there hardly is any movie can make me cry (there are more songs that can :P), but I think the last time I cried in a movie was in Return of the King, where Sam says "I can't carry the ring for you, but I can carry you", it's was just such a damn moving line...:D

nordicdusk
Wednesday, May 3rd, 2006, 11:54 PM
The film My Left Foot and Awakenings always get me

Gagnraad
Wednesday, May 3rd, 2006, 11:57 PM
I think it was when I was a little kiddo, when I saw the first Halloween movie, when Mikael Myers fall from the window... I thought he died :(
I don't know why, but I have always liked Mikael Myers. He is such a fascinating character.
Hmm, I have never cried because of a movie before(except of that)... But I have felt the famous "itching" in your troath(If only I knew what that's called in English!) because of several romantic/touching/sad scenes or movies. :)

I have started to cry several times when listening to music... Especially to one band... ;)

nordicdusk
Thursday, May 4th, 2006, 12:03 AM
Well music is the most powerful form of expression for me so i get very very emotional about music certain songs rip me apart.

Ælfhere
Thursday, May 4th, 2006, 05:23 AM
Kingdom of Heaven: After Baldwin IV died and his sister lifted his mask.

Sigrid
Thursday, May 4th, 2006, 08:40 AM
The Lion King when Mafusa dies defending his folk. And especially later when he appears as a star-like ancestor and tells Simba to inherit his destiny.

(Gag, that English phrase you are looking for is "a lump in your throat" :~( )

Nordblut
Thursday, May 4th, 2006, 02:03 PM
Lord of the Ring was a movie with a few moments where I was about to cry... I really had a lump in my throat in the movie 'Der Untergang', when a twelve-year old girl and her little brother were defending Berlin against overwhelming masses of russian soldiers. The little girl was shot and the movie showed her laying on a hill of corpses with her blond hair beeing soaked with blood and her tiny brother crying over her body. This was really... well you know...:~(

Alkman
Friday, May 5th, 2006, 12:54 PM
Not exactly crying but there's always something with Tim Burton's movies that makes me a bit emotional. "Spartacus" also, no matter the number of times i've watched it.

The last time i saw someone crying while watching a movie was a friend of mine last winter. We were watching the "Chronicles of Narnia", the part of Aslan's sacrifice.

Sigrid
Friday, May 5th, 2006, 01:05 PM
I have a friend who gets all choked up whenever he hears the Viking prayer before battle from The 13th Warrior. Read it and if you are Heathen you may find yourself infused with strange music too:

Lo, there do I see my father

Lo, there do I see my mother and my sisters and my brothers

Lo, there do I see the line of my people back to the beginning

Lo, they do call to me

They bid me take my place among them in the Halls of Valhalla

Where the brave may live forever...

Source (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_13th_Warrior)

Gagnraad
Friday, May 5th, 2006, 01:26 PM
@Sigrid: I always feel the lump in my throat when the chieftain in The 13th Warrior is dying and stand infront of the barricades to protect his village:~( That scene is always sad :(Beutifull hair do he have as well :P
And this is the best film, because they speak Norwegian in the first scenes :P

Sigrid
Friday, May 5th, 2006, 01:42 PM
Oh yes, Gag, the hair is what always makes me feel like I have been stabbed with a lance. This is the ultimate folk emblem. They say the warriors who lived above Birka carried combs on their belts so important was their hair.
:odinsleip

Ewergrin
Friday, May 5th, 2006, 02:22 PM
Lots of movies have made me cry, though I cannot name any at this moment (it's early and I have not had my coffee yet). Usually movies that make me cry involve touching or sad scenes between a father and son.

nordicdusk
Friday, May 5th, 2006, 09:59 PM
Lots of movies have made me cry, though I cannot name any at this moment (it's early and I have not had my coffee yet). Usually movies that make me cry involve touching or sad scenes between a father and son.
I agree with that like the end of Big Fish that hit me hard.

Ewergrin
Saturday, May 6th, 2006, 03:38 PM
I agree with that like the end of Big Fish that hit me hard.
Funny you should mention that. Big Fish is definitely one of the movies I was thinking of.

nordicdusk
Saturday, May 6th, 2006, 03:57 PM
Yes i dont have the relationship i would like with my father so that hit me hard.

Alice
Saturday, May 6th, 2006, 07:55 PM
I'm strongly affected when animals, especially dogs and horses, die in movies.:(

Alizon Device
Saturday, May 6th, 2006, 10:05 PM
Awakenings always get me

Yes, Awakenings, when de Niro realises he is relapsing in the hospital canteen.
I first saw it with my then girlfriend, and realised, in horror, that tears were welling up!
It was almost physically painful to hold it all in. (I'm no macho man, but we hadn't been seeing each other long, and she didn't seem moved very much!)

Also, the end of Brazil always gets me.
And the asteroid film where the woman and her estranged dad stand on the beach, looking at the tidal wave coming to kill them. Is it Deep Impact or Sudden Impact?

Gagnraad
Sunday, May 7th, 2006, 09:43 PM
And the asteroid film where the woman and her estranged dad stand on the beach, looking at the tidal wave coming to kill them. Is it Deep Impact or Sudden Impact?
I think it's Sudden Impact, but I know what movie you mean. I really like that movie(And that scene ofcourse, is almost overwhelming...)

Pellonpekko
Sunday, May 7th, 2006, 10:03 PM
I really had a lump in my throat in the movie 'Der Untergang

Same here. Very sad feeling in the end. But any other movies? Hmm, cant really remember atm.. Titanic back then gave me the lump too :D, but dont know if i would now feel any sorrow for Leonardo... I should watch it one day again.

Pellonpekko
Monday, May 8th, 2006, 12:53 PM
The Lion King when Mafusa dies defending his folk. And especially later when he appears as a star-like ancestor and tells Simba to inherit his destiny.

(Gag, that English phrase you are looking for is "a lump in your throat" :~( )


I´m sorry but i just have to:

http://img160.imageshack.us/img160/7588/2a9498faf20885900546136543b09c.jpg


And yes, Lion King is great movie :)

Sigrid
Monday, May 8th, 2006, 01:44 PM
:D :D :D That made my day, of course, PP. Thanks. :D :D

Nordblut
Monday, May 8th, 2006, 02:12 PM
:D

Lion King was the first movie I´ve ever seen. I´ts actually a great movie, such a versatile story, really emotional. Lots of friendship, love and happiness, but also feelings of loss and tragedy... I watched it when I was about six and this movie was the first time in my life I experienced such feelings...

Sigrid
Monday, May 8th, 2006, 02:57 PM
And there's not a single human in it. That is what makes it so unusual. As I live in Africa I can assure you that the artists have the creatures perfectly characterised and the spirit of the circle of life with the rain and drought as rewards and punishment for honour or cowardice, the lioness mother who is humiliated by the false lion king - all very authentic of these animals. My favourite of the secondary characters is the warthog. They are very courageous and defensive in reality. The whole film is just a small masterpiece of the meaning of what goes around comes around. It's the film every adolescent should see because it is about the sacred burden of coming of age and the true meaning of kingship as well as kinship.

Ice Age is another favourite of mine. Tragic in the human context when the man loses his wife and child and utterly devastating when the mammoth finds his lost family depicted in paintings on a cave wall.

Ælfhere
Monday, May 8th, 2006, 04:05 PM
@Sigrid: I always feel the lump in my throat when the chieftain in The 13th Warrior is dying and stand infront of the barricades to protect his village:~( That scene is always sad :(Beutifull hair do he have as well :P
And this is the best film, because they speak Norwegian in the first scenes :P

OK stupid question: What part of Scandinavia does the 13th Warrior take place? For some reason I've always thought Sweden but was it Norway instead? Earlier in the film they were on a Russian river so I guess I thought they were Swedes because of this.

Sigrid
Monday, May 8th, 2006, 04:50 PM
I have reservations about the movie in parts. It portrays the Vikings as slobs, a common problem. It glorifies the intellect and religion of the Arab 13th warrior as superior. The Vikings come across as somewhat terrified when confronted with the serpentine apparition and it is the Muslim who goes off to investigate. He also sleeps with the Viking woman who acts like a tart. These things annoyed me at the time, but as it was at least a film about the subject that at least had most of it worth watching I let these irritations alone, but I did notice and they did stick in my craw.

Gagnraad
Tuesday, May 9th, 2006, 02:39 AM
OK stupid question: What part of Scandinavia does the 13th Warrior take place?
I have absolutely no idea. :)
And it is some years since I saw it now, but I imagine they speak on Norwegian. Because that made me so damn proud! :D First time Hollywood make a film where people actually speak my language! :D

Ewergrin
Tuesday, May 9th, 2006, 04:54 AM
Is this the movie with Antonio Benderas (sp?)

I saw the trailers for it but it immediately turned away when I saw that it was him. How on earth could it not be a load of hogwash?

Sigrid
Tuesday, May 9th, 2006, 06:07 AM
Yes, EG, Antonio was the Ayrab, lol. He made quite a good one too, but was very cultivated in comparison with the portrayal of our folk, all illiterate and primitive with promiscuous women who leapt into the bearskins with passing strangers. The usual unmitigated trashing, a little less obvious then but much bolder and more overtly offensive now as they are getting braver by the day.

The film had a profound effect on young Heathens though as they often speak to me of that prayer and so I think some of the producer's intentions backfired, as is always the case with wyrd, a factor they know nothing about and do not believe in and forgot to insert into their movie. But wyrd has been created so there's no stopping it now. ;)

Vanir
Tuesday, May 9th, 2006, 06:33 AM
Yes, EG, Antonio was the Ayrab, lol. He made quite a good one too, but was very cultivated in comparison with the portrayal of our folk, all illiterate and primitive with promiscuous women who leapt into the bearskins with passing strangers. The usual unmitigated trashing, a little less obvious then but much bolder and more overtly offensive now as they are getting braver by the day.

The film had a profound effect on young Heathens though as they often speak to me of that prayer and so I think some of the producer's intentions backfired, as is always the case with wyrd, a factor they know nothing about and do not believe in and forgot to insert into their movie. But wyrd has been created so there's no stopping it now. ;)

Yes, some good little bits slipped through the net in that film. I like the way Buliwyf is the archetypical Germanic hero, straight out of a Saga or Epic. With one glance he memorized arabic writing, just to put the gloating, sallow pederast Banderas in his place. Even his death is straight out of the the golden age of Heroism. If I had a sword and shield, I'd have clashed them to salute that death.

As for films that made me cry, well I have to admit none ever in the way this thread intends, though I did cry with laughter at American Psycho when he washes his hands with his gloves still on, dizzy and nauseous with shock and repulsion.

Nordblut
Thursday, May 11th, 2006, 01:22 PM
There are so much German and Northern histories that could be filmed, why does nobody make such movies? Is money the only thing that counts when a director makes a new movie? I think not! If I were a director, I would use this platform to tell the people something, otherwise it would be a pure amusement movie, and this kind of movies is already widespread. I like the movies from which I experience something, which give me an impression that stays for the rest of my life...

Sigrid
Thursday, May 11th, 2006, 02:26 PM
We need a whole film industry and publishing industry of our own so we can have the things we used to like. I find less and less to watch and read these days, so I just watch and read older stuff. :(

Nordblut
Monday, May 15th, 2006, 08:09 AM
Me too...:( Don´t we have any divinely gifted writers or directors among us? There are really masses of historical material worth beeing written or filmed. Perhaps I should become writer...:rolleyes:

Sigrid
Monday, May 15th, 2006, 10:02 AM
I am already a writer. They won't publish us. You literally cannot get in the door. I have resorted to self-publishing. It is not the way to go as the bookshop mafia keeps you away, off the shelves and sequestrated from the public and from the reviewers who are the servants of the bookshop mafia and the publishing elite.

We need a whole parallel system from the ground up to be rebuilt by us. It will be another activist enterprise that I hope can be begun soon. To a large extent, the Lord of the Rings movies began the process.

As far as any of us getting a toe in the door, forget it. All the doors are closed and the circle is already complete. Even the literary agents are hamstrung. The writers and actors and filmmakers and anyone else in the "parallel" universe are well and truly shut out.

Unless ....

Nordblut
Monday, May 15th, 2006, 01:31 PM
At least the underground music industry leaves us our freedom and publishes many serious Pagan Folk and Metal bands. I think Pagan music is the best for newbies, because the lyrics can often tell stories more easy than a scientific text which requires a lot of understanding and time.

Anyway, you´re right with Lord of the Rings. This has been a positive step into the future, allthough it was a fantasy movie, it included so much northern cultural material (Gandalf, the Elves and Dwarves). And who made this book, the template of the movie? Not some writer who invented the story like the directors and scriptwriters do it today, but a Germanist and linguistic skillful man named J.R.R. Tolkien. This, I think, is real art, to create a story either exactly from the original lore, or even more to make an own story which includes elements from these sagas, like Lord of the Ring does...

Sigurd
Monday, May 15th, 2006, 02:35 PM
or even more to make an own story which includes elements from these sagas, like Lord of the Ring does...

"Talent borrows, genius steals." ;)

nordicdusk
Monday, May 15th, 2006, 08:02 PM
The film industry gets worse and worse with every realise.Dose anyone here have an independant cimema in or cross to their town.

Nordblut
Tuesday, May 16th, 2006, 07:48 AM
That´s the problem! A TV channel for our kind would be enough, but broadcasting a new channel would be quite expensive. Perhaps we need to propagate our beliefs in the society rather than founding a new society for our own... Is there any media that would propagate old Germanic cultural values? I don´t think so, except from internet and music... It´s a pity for all those of us whose will is to change our world...:(

Sigrid
Tuesday, May 16th, 2006, 10:05 AM
I agree it's probably one of the best ways to do it, Nordblut. Often this "trend" inside a group can grow and become the group or become large enough to be a group on its own. All trends do is replace other trends, after all. :)

Vanir
Tuesday, May 16th, 2006, 10:23 AM
I am already a writer. They won't publish us. You literally cannot get in the door. I have resorted to self-publishing. It is not the way to go as the bookshop mafia keeps you away, off the shelves and sequestrated from the public and from the reviewers who are the servants of the bookshop mafia and the publishing elite.

We need a whole parallel system from the ground up to be rebuilt by us. It will be another activist enterprise that I hope can be begun soon. To a large extent, the Lord of the Rings movies began the process.

As far as any of us getting a toe in the door, forget it. All the doors are closed and the circle is already complete. Even the literary agents are hamstrung. The writers and actors and filmmakers and anyone else in the "parallel" universe are well and truly shut out.

Unless ....
that Kaavya Viswanathan debacle sums it all up, plagiarizing openly the works of others, yet slipped through the net as she was essentially a Jew Publisher's (Katherine Cohen) new "marketable product", a "package" as I read it referred to as. :ugh. The simple notion that one submits a manuscript which is then accepted or rejected purely on its merits is clearly so far from the reality of the process that it might as well be from a fairytale.

If I won the Lottery, running my own Publishing company would be one of the ventures I would undertake (along with funding a new Folkwandering to Siberia, or somewhere similary uninhabited)

Nordblut
Wednesday, May 17th, 2006, 10:20 AM
I think, it´s the best idea to win more people for our sake by telling potential members in the internet and in our personal environment. The day will come when there are so much of us that the call for independence becomes loud enough to enable us better platforms. :~( Until that day... we have to increase the numbers of our brethren and erect the foundation of our freedom. As you said, Sigrid, one trend will replace another, and the day will come when the warming sun raises over a renewed Germanic north...

:odinsleip

Sigrid
Thursday, May 18th, 2006, 08:24 AM
Agree Nordblut.

Vanir, I had a publishing company but gave it up as without heaps of cash you can forget it. Harry Potter is a mishmash of mediocre fiction and because it is laden with politically correct indoctrination and written by an arch lefty the writer is now obscenely wealthy with respect to her creative capability.

Perhaps the tide will turn but I think this will only happen if there is a base from which to launch our exploratory ventures. I am considering such a thing. I have made another of my "not going back" decisions and soon may be able to act on it. First you need to get the lie of the land and to have a very strong conscience from which you will not deviate even if they light a fire under your ass. When you think you can take what may be coming then you should step into the karmic wind. It's necessary in order to pull the birthing gyre of a new age into our ken.

Sigurd
Thursday, May 18th, 2006, 02:04 PM
Harry Potter is a mishmash of mediocre fiction and because it is laden with politically correct indoctrination and written by an arch lefty the writer is now obscenely wealthy with respect to her creative capability.


And the movies, especially the fourth one, are even worse. Let me explain here: When I read the books, I cared little for people's names. So Harry Potter fancied Cho Chang, who by name is obviously Chinese, but I cared little for what people's names were - as it was only a book, and the storylines themselves were what were interesting to an 11 year old. So as stupid as it sounds, my vision of the book - regardless of what peoples names were - were an entirely white bunch of people - for such is the background I grew up in, and so why would I imagine books any differently thus.
Then came the movies. I tried to look away at black Lee Jordan, that was so totally not what I had had in mind. Maybe I did not read the passage well enough the times I read it, but I don't think it ever said. This was then the major infraction until film four:
Suddenly the amount of non-white pupils at Hogwarts was at least 3 times the amount than before. And what annoyed me most was that both other schools looked astonishingly homogenous - but no, the British one has to be a conglomerate of thousands and thousands. And remember Angelina Johnson - the girl who played for Gryffindor in the book? Aye - in film one she was still a white Brit, in film four she was black as the night.

The movie itself was well-made, as a movie - but from the brainwash it is intended to give, I could do little other than puke out all the popcorn I had eaten during its duration. I tried to ignore all the politically correct stuff that was additionally added by the movies - but it was simply impossible. I mean, we have to accept that the books were set up in storylines in 1992 by a lefty -> but the fourth film was filmed in 2005 by a even more lefty director! :runaway
-------------
Anyway - regarding the publishing.
The point is to write a novel, and have your ideas underlining it. Like make your character loveable and then have him defy a multi-kult state under the assumption that his culture's been pushed away.
Or teach them about Lore - like Tolkien did.
The final other thing is to clear up misconceptions of bygone history. As such, I have started already to write (in German) a book of historical fiction about the conquests of Charlemagne -> from the viewpoint of a Germanic farmer. ;)


or somewhere similary uninhabited)
Southern Argentina would do it.
Uninhabited, so you can't push a way a culture there. Full of good nature with mountains and glades and lakes...well, just the Spanish Buenos-Aireans that one'd have to overthrow :P

Sigrid
Thursday, May 18th, 2006, 07:48 PM
And the movies, especially the fourth one, are even worse. Let me explain here: When I read the books, I cared little for people's names. So Harry Potter fancied Cho Chang, who by name is obviously Chinese, but I cared little for what people's names were - as it was only a book, and the storylines themselves were what were interesting to an 11 year old. So as stupid as it sounds, my vision of the book - regardless of what peoples names were - were an entirely white bunch of people - for such is the background I grew up in, and so why would I imagine books any differently thus.
Then came the movies. I tried to look away at black Lee Jordan, that was so totally not what I had had in mind. Maybe I did not read the passage well enough the times I read it, but I don't think it ever said. This was then the major infraction until film four:
Suddenly the amount of non-white pupils at Hogwarts was at least 3 times the amount than before. And what annoyed me most was that both other schools looked astonishingly homogenous - but no, the British one has to be a conglomerate of thousands and thousands. And remember Angelina Johnson - the girl who played for Gryffindor in the book? Aye - in film one she was still a white Brit, in film four she was black as the night.

The movie itself was well-made, as a movie - but from the brainwash it is intended to give, I could do little other than puke out all the popcorn I had eaten during its duration. I tried to ignore all the politically correct stuff that was additionally added by the movies - but it was simply impossible. I mean, we have to accept that the books were set up in storylines in 1992 by a lefty -> but the fourth film was filmed in 2005 by a even more lefty director! :runaway


Yes, the special effects are good and I especially like quidditch and I especially like that English boy who often does so well at it, I can't remember his name but he would be my dream boy if I were the age of the characters in book one where I first saw him in the film of this. He was playing quidditch. I thought he was really a superb piece of work, but as you say things have gone from bad to worse and now it is something of a farce.

Good luck with your writing. It all sounds very interesting!

Sigurd
Friday, May 19th, 2006, 12:05 AM
Good luck with your writing. It all sounds very interesting!

Why, thanks! :curtsy

I also have one project running with a bunch of friends, which is kind of Dark Fantasy; but never worry, "my" character is an outright heathen. :D

Ahnenerbe e.V.
Friday, May 19th, 2006, 10:53 AM
Documentaries about WWII. I never watch until the end.

Eisenmann
Friday, May 19th, 2006, 11:05 AM
heheheh, why is that? Aren't you proud of what you see? Or do you cry because all the beauty was destroyed?

nordicdusk
Sunday, May 21st, 2006, 09:49 PM
Just watched King Kong as i had taught it was crap but it had a touching ending i felt that it shows that love has no limits.I know its a strange message to get but i had to make scence of it movie some how.

Gorm the Old
Wednesday, May 24th, 2006, 03:18 PM
At least since early childhood, no movie has ever made me cry. They have inspired various emotions such as outrage, but none has ever moved me to tears.

Nordblut
Thursday, June 1st, 2006, 12:14 PM
I generally can´t understand why many people are ashamed to cry in public. I don´t think it is bad to cry, that is a normal human emotion, and I pity those who disown or oppress their natural feelings...

Vanir
Friday, December 8th, 2006, 01:34 AM
I know, I know (http://redwing.hutman.net/%7Emreed/warriorshtm/necromancer.htm) but only just read this...


If I won the Lottery, running my own Publishing company would be one of the ventures I would undertake (along with funding a new Folkwandering to Siberia, or somewhere similary uninhabited) 05-16-2006 09:05 PM

Southern Argentina would do it.
Uninhabited, so you can't push a way a culture there. Full of good nature with mountains and glades and lakes...well, just the Spanish Buenos-Aireans that one'd have to overthrow :P
The Welsh already tried in Argentina in Patagonia. Once they'd cleared, settled the area on their own, and were an established, stable colony, the Argentinian Government reneged on their promise to leave them alone and moved in

from BBC website

Patagonia: The little Wales 8,000 miles away
By the turn of the 20th century, with the Welsh having established a European presence in Patagonia, the Argentine government stepped in, said "muchos gracias", took over direct control and extinguished the Welsh people's governmental and educational autonomy. Ironically, this happened just as the Welsh language was being grudgingly allowed into the education system back in Wales where, now, a quarter of all children attend Welsh-medium schools.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/legacies/immig_emig/wales/w_nw/img/n_w_wales_article03_body_01.jpg
© BBC In Patagonia, direct rule meant the end of Welsh in local government and in the schools, and the beginning of a flood of Spanish and other European immigration which quickly made the Welsh a minority in the colony that they had founded.

I don't know what the Welsh were thinking actually trusting Argentinians to keep their word and leave them to be autonomous.

You'd have to literally "buy" a swathe of remote land completely from some cash-desperate tinpot country to create a new nation on.

Taking control of Tasmania, or the South Island of New Zealand, then seceding and starting a racialist colony, is a pleasant day dream. Islands are hard to get at and easy to defend. Immediate establishment of a Nuclear Deterrent comes to mind also (following Israel's example), though "damned if you do, damned if you don't"

Even surviving just a few generations might be enough to start a fire. Just long enough to put roots down, and break the cycle of control that the Liberal West exercises on thought, spirit and body.

There'd definitely be no popular culture in my country.

NatRev
Friday, December 8th, 2006, 07:38 PM
Never seen the full version of Watership Down. :(

Seen clips but it upsets me.

There's another film too about a couple of dogs that escape from a laboratory. Only seen a clip of that, maybe Richard Briers voice again, but even so, I think that'd upset me more than anything.

Felt a bit gutted at the end of the Last Samurai too.

Most disturbing film I've ever seen, 8mm. :O

ladybright
Wednesday, December 20th, 2006, 04:26 AM
I get all emotional about the music and landscapes as well as the plot and character interaction.
I saw The Last Unicorn in the theater and was terrified of the red bull for weeks(I was five years old). I felt so sorry for the unicorn having learned sorrow.

The Dark Crystal. It got me so hard as a child that I stil tear up at times.

Watership Down. It is not sutable for very young children. Good adult themes.

The Crow. "Someday all things will be fair and there will be wonderful surprises. I truely do belive this."J O'Bar-The Crow(My favorite fantasy for grownups.)

Lord of the Rings. The cinamatoggraphy and score are moving on their own.

Blade Runner. The Origami unicorn at the end. Chicken(animal) Man Unicorn. The tragedy of mortality. The ascencien of a person. People can be more than what they come from.

Beowulf and Grendel. I was never that sympathetic to both Beowulf and Grendel at the same time.

Awakenings. I can not add anything that has not been said.

The unbearable lightness of being. How they managed to make a life if such a turbulent time.

Suburbia. The punk movie from 1984 not the comedy. When the girl is returned to her b****** of a father always gets me.

Henry & June when Anis Nin and Henry Miller realize that June is realy gone.

Serenity. 'I dont need to beat you I just want to go my way'
Also the Firefly DVD Go browncoats!!

Rob Roy. Most of it. It felt more intamite than Braveheart and was more poiniant because of it.I forget the exact line but when he says 'raise him as my son'.

Braveheart. Ummm. All of it.

Dances with Wolves. Kevin Costner as the good white man. His relationship with the wolf was particularly touching.

Last of the Mochicans. I liked the movie so much that the soundtrack was playing when my daughter was born. The visuals make me tear up. My family is from upstate NY and even though it was filmed in the carolinas it looks like upstate.

Mirrormask. A teenage girl goes on a heroes quest to save her mother. I remember how I felt when I was a teenager and had family health emergincies.

The Last Samurai was good. The whole last of its kind movie pulls my heartstrings. Ie last unicorn, last of the mochicans, dances w/ wolves, LOTR elves and 'high' men etc.

Platoon. One of my dads favorite movies. The kind that would have him sing 'paint it black' afterwards.

When we were Soldiers. One of the best vietnam war movies ever made.

Codetalkers. Honor, valor, sioux what more could you ask of a WWII movie.

The biography of Lenard Peltier. America has P.O.W.s too.

I liked the visuals and the viking prayer in 13th warrior but was pissed at alot of it.

nickymuench
Wednesday, December 20th, 2006, 08:22 AM
Romeo + Juliet (1996)

Shakespeare's famous play is updated to the hip modern suburb of Verona still retaining its original dialogue. The gun-toting members of the families wage a vicious war on the streets as the star-crossed lovers, their tragic destiny.

Summary written by Alexander Lum

Classic story of Romeo and Juliet, set in a modern-day city of Verona Beach. The Montagues and Capulets are two feuding families, whose children meet and fall in love. They have to hide their love from the world because they know that their parents will not allow them to be together. There are obstacles on the way, like Juliet's cousin, Tybalt, and Romeo's friend Mercutio, and many fights. But although it is set in modern times, it is still the same timeless story of the "star crossed lovers".

Summary written by Anonymous

In Verona Beach there lives two families. The Montagues and the Capulets. Among these two families are two teenagers, Juliet Capulet and Romeo Montague. One night, Flugencio Capulet decides to have a party. Romeo, being in love with Capulet's niece Rosaline, goes along dressed as the boy King Arthur. That's where he sees Juliet Capulet as an angel ("Did my heart love till now:forswear it sight, for I ne'er saw true beauty till this night.") they fall in love instantly only to find out that they are enemies. Tybalt has seen Romeo at the party and vows to pay him back. That night, Romeo decides to see Juliet again. He sneaks into the Capulet yard. By the pool. Juliet sees him. They 'Met, they wooed and exchange of vow'. The next day Romeo tells the nurse, the only one that knows of their secret love, that Juliet shall be married at the hour of 9. Meanwhile Tybalt has found Mercutio they start to until Romeo drives up. Tybalt kicks him viciously. Then Mercutio, not being able to stand it comes over. Romeos sees Mercutio almost kill Tybalt. He goes between them. Tybalt tries to stab Romeo with a shard of glass but gets Mercutio. Mercutio dies, and Romeo wreaks revenge.

Trailer (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0117509/trailers-screenplay-E13568-10-2) <--click

I look this film by 25 or 30, and always i cry, always!!! :(

Blood_Axis
Wednesday, December 20th, 2006, 12:20 PM
I recently cried hard with The Wind that Shakes the Barley (http://www.thewindthatshakesthebarley.co.uk/) :(


Ireland, 1920. Damien and Teddy are brothers. But while the latter is already the leader of a guerrilla squad fighting for the independence of his motherland, Damien, a medical student at University College, would rather finish his training at the London hospital where he has found a place. However, shortly before his departure, he happens to witness atrocities committed by the ferocious Black and Tans and finally decides to join the resistance group led by Teddy. The two brothers fight side by side until a truce is signed. Bur peace is short-lived and when England imposes a treaty regarded unfair by a part of the population war resumes, this time pitting Irishmen against Irishmen, brothers against brothers, Teddy against Damien...

I have also cried a river with

In the Name of the Father (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0107207/)


A small time theif from Belfast, Gerry Conlon, is falsely implicated in the IRA bombing of a pub that kills several people while he is in London. Bullied by the British police, he and four of his friends are coerced into confessing their guilt. Gerry's father and other relatives in London are also implicated in the crime. He spends 14 years in prison with his father trying to prove his innocence with the help of a British attorney, Gareth Peirce. Based on a true story.

Based on the true story of Gerry Conlon, a Belfast youth who - along with family members and friends - was wrongly convicted of bombing two pubs outside of London. A story about the relationship between a father and his son who fought for justice to clear his father's name.


I remember I was young when I saw it in the movies, my father could not stop me from crying & sobbing uncontrollably for hours.. :(

I also can't stop the flow with:

Nuovo cinema Paradiso (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0095765/)

Der Himmel über Berlin (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0093191/)

The Red Violin (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0120802/)

The Seventh Seal (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0050976/)

The Last Emperor (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0093389/)

and many more I can't remember right now. I cry easily. ;)