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Alkman
Saturday, August 14th, 2004, 02:13 PM
Anglo-Saxon 'princess' shows face


Clues from the skull give clues to reconstruction of the face
http://forums.skadi.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=17356&stc=1
State-of-the-art forensic techniques have been used to reconstruct the face of an Anglo-Saxon woman who had similar status to a modern princess.
The woman, nicknamed "Mrs Getty" after the oil mogulfor the 500 precious objects buried with her, was one of 219 bodies unearthed in Gloucestershire.

Mrs Getty, who died in the 6th Century, was surrounded by gilt bronze brooches, amber beads, silver and ivory rings.

Anthropologist Caroline Wilkinson made the painstaking facial reconstruction.

Dr Wilkinson, of Manchester University, is an anthropologist who has worked with the police and is a familiar face on the BBC's Ancestors programme.

Grave goods

A reconstruction of the woman in her coffin, complete with clothes, grave goods and hair, will appear at a permanent gallery at the Corinium Museum in Cirencester.

Mrs Getty's grave was discovered at an archaeological dig in 1985 at Butler's Field in Lechlade, Gloucestershire. The site is thought to have been used continuously during the Anglo-Saxon period.

Judy Mills of Corinium Museum told The Daily Telegraph newspaper:


Mrs Getty's brooch marks her out as a high-status burial
http://forums.skadi.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=17357&stc=1
"We know that she was between 25 and 30, but we don't know what she died of. She had by far the richest grave with almost 500 precious objects buried with her.

"She also had a wooden coffin with stones packed around it. This meant she held very high status. The big square-headed brooch on her shoulder is a very rare find. It tells us she was important."

Facial reconstruction work is used by forensic scientists to trace missing persons and in surgical reconstruction.

Forensic artists reconstruct the face in clay using clues from the shape of the skull. They are also guided by standard tissue depths around the head which have been calculated from measurements on historic humans.

Some features, such as the shape of the eyes, ears and lips are based on a certain amount of educated guesswork.

Agrippa
Saturday, August 14th, 2004, 04:15 PM
Thats probably one of the worst and most unrealistic reconstructions I ever saw.
I dont speak just about the skin tone or that she is depicted here without hair, but especially if you look at the eye and nose region, you can see that every scholar of arts could have done it much better...maybe every amateur.

Prussian
Saturday, August 14th, 2004, 04:24 PM
Thats probably one of the worst and most unrealistic reconstructions I ever saw.
I dont speak just about the skin tone or that she is depicted here without hair, but especially if you look at the eye and nose region, you can see that every scholar of arts could have done it much better...maybe every amateur.Yes my thoughts exactly, generally speaking reconstructions are mostly guess work not an exacting science, though the skull can give hints as into the general appearance a reconstruction can never by exact in any sense.

Though I admit the reconstruction of King Philip the father of Alexander was a rather goodone but also the fact remains that the scholars had art works to go by so this would have influenced the outcome greatly.

Phill
Saturday, August 14th, 2004, 04:52 PM
Thats probably one of the worst and most unrealistic reconstructions I ever saw.
I dont speak just about the skin tone or that she is depicted here without hair, but especially if you look at the eye and nose region, you can see that every scholar of arts could have done it much better...maybe every amateur.

Having taken some art classes, I would say it's more than very safe to say almost every amateur.

I've seen people, far from a small minority, who have made better looking clay head on only their second or third tries.

Grimr
Sunday, August 15th, 2004, 12:07 AM
Nobody who looked like that could belong to a people that made something as complex as "Mrs Getty's brooch".

Dr. Solar Wolff
Sunday, August 15th, 2004, 04:06 AM
Thats probably one of the worst and most unrealistic reconstructions I ever saw.
I dont speak just about the skin tone or that she is depicted here without hair, but especially if you look at the eye and nose region, you can see that every scholar of arts could have done it much better...maybe every amateur.

Either that or Mrs. Getty was one hell of an ugly woman.

Esther_Helena
Sunday, August 15th, 2004, 06:46 AM
Ms.Getty looks like the child of Human-Fiona and Ogre-Shrek. Fugly!:-O

Prussian
Sunday, August 15th, 2004, 01:36 PM
Ms.Getty looks like the child of Human-Fiona and Ogre-Shrek. Fugly!:-OThat is a likely scenario you have made from your observation.:)

Prussian_Mystic
Wednesday, August 18th, 2004, 09:50 AM
That is a likely scenario you have made from your observation I knew it all along,The ogre`s did exist! and now we have the Proof! :D

Allenson
Wednesday, August 18th, 2004, 08:42 PM
Are there any links to this article and/or who did the reconstruction? They need to receive an email from me proclaiming their ridiculousness.

That hideous thing is supposed to be an Anglo-Saxon "princess"? Looks more like an Uruk-hai to me. :-O

SudVolk
Wednesday, August 18th, 2004, 08:46 PM
Are there any links to this article and/or who did the reconstruction? They need to receive an email from me proclaiming their ridiculousness.

That hideous thing is supposed to be an Anglo-Saxon "princess"? Looks more like an Uruk-hai to me. :-OMore "Afro-Saxon" than "Anglo-Saxon"

Grimr
Wednesday, August 18th, 2004, 08:48 PM
Is it possible they picked up the wrong skull? Like some Negro prostitute dies of a drug overdose in 1978 near where they find the brooch and then later on they dig up the whole thing and think the two are related?

Allenson
Wednesday, August 18th, 2004, 08:49 PM
More "Afro-Saxon" than "Anglo-Saxon"


LOL--Or, how about "Angola-Saxon". :P

SudVolk
Wednesday, August 18th, 2004, 08:51 PM
LOL--Or, how about "Angola-Saxon". :PV. good :P

Allenson
Wednesday, August 18th, 2004, 08:58 PM
Anthropologist Caroline Wilkinson made the painstaking facial reconstruction.

Dr Wilkinson, of Manchester University, is an anthropologist who has worked with the police and is a familiar face on the BBC's Ancestors programme.



Perhaps I shall direct my complaints here. ;)


Edit: Found her here:

http://www.biomed2.man.ac.uk/biology/artinmed/homepage.html

Northern Paladin
Monday, May 23rd, 2011, 07:46 PM
http://www.show.me.uk/dbimages/chunked_image/2006_3637.JPG

Yikes!

http://www.show.me.uk/dbimages/chunked_image/2006_3659.jpg

Looks like an Fionna Ogre's twin.

http://www.alicia-logic.com/capsimages/sk_048Fiona.jpg

Propaganda, anyone?

wittwer
Tuesday, May 24th, 2011, 04:26 AM
Certainly not one of the "Beautiful" people. But then, who of us are? And that sandy blonde hair and blue grey eyes, Artistic license perhaps?

Hilderinc
Tuesday, May 24th, 2011, 06:14 AM
Thats probably one of the worst and most unrealistic reconstructions I ever saw.
I dont speak just about the skin tone or that she is depicted here without hair, but especially if you look at the eye and nose region, you can see that every scholar of arts could have done it much better...maybe every amateur.



Anthropologist Caroline Wilkinson made the painstaking facial reconstruction.

Dr Wilkinson, of Manchester University, is an anthropologist who has worked with the police and is a familiar face on the BBC's Ancestors programme.


Wilkinson made the brown Bach, as well.

http://static.howstuffworks.com/gif/body-farm-3.jpg

Ocko
Tuesday, May 24th, 2011, 02:17 PM
I would say, she herself needs a face-modeling and a new haircut.