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chrisjqb
Tuesday, September 12th, 2017, 08:40 PM
In analogy to mugs made of glas called a Glas (https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trinkglas) a mug made of stone can be called a Stein (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beer_stein). Wikipedia claims that this use of Stein is not a German word but an English neologism. And then there is the Holy Grail which in German is called a Stein while in other literature it is a vessel (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holy_Grail)?

Juthunge
Tuesday, September 12th, 2017, 09:12 PM
Well, yes, calling a drinking vessel merely a "Stein" makes no sense in German as opposed to a "Glas"(I never actually thought about that, tbh).
What is referred to as "Stein" in English, would be a "Steinkrug" in German, a "Bierkrug", simply a "Krug" or a "Humpen". But the latter three are more general and not restricted to being made of stoneware as such.

I've never heard the Holy Grail being referred to as a "Stein" but perhaps as being made of stone, yes. But usually it's called a "Kelch".

chrisjqb
Tuesday, September 12th, 2017, 10:08 PM
I've never heard the Holy Grail being referred to as a "Stein" but perhaps as being made of stone, yes. But usually it's called a "Kelch". I was thinking of Wolfram von Eschenbach, Wikipedia says:Ist der Gral bei Chrétien ein Gefäß, so wird er bei Wolfram als Stein oder Steingefäß bezeichnet, (https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heiliger_Gral)