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Catterick
Thursday, June 16th, 2016, 11:23 PM
Changing images of the wild woman.

https://www.academia.edu/20559306/From_Page_to_Print_the_transformation_of _the_wild_woman_in_early_modern_Northern _engravings


The savage ‘wild woman’ emerged in European medieval folk legend and literary sources with the descriptive identity of aterrifying monster. Wild men and women were quasi-human-looking creatureswith hair-covered bodies, believed to lurk in the darkest corners of unexplored forests. Wild folk, both men andwomen, were known for unpredictable, violent behavior that matched their animal appearance. Known in folk and writtentraditions primarily for her profound ugliness, her promiscuity,and for stealing and eating human children, the wild woman experienced, in nature and appearance, a contradictory shiftmost apparent in the early fifteenth century as the topos wasabsorbed from folk legend and texts into the visual medium of small engravings. At this time Northern European visual representations of the wild woman were dislocated from theharsh characterizations of her textual foundations, and the wildwoman was reinvented in printed imagery as a beautiful, if hair-covered, youthful woman, and the anchor of a newly domesticated wild family unit. This appealing type of wild woman with flowing hair and dainty gestures was pictured inearly engravings such as Wild Woman with a Unicorn, c .1440–1467(figure 1) by the anonymous German printmaker known as Master ES. Engravings of the wild woman proliferated in the fifteenth century but give no hint of the fierceness that marked her presence in medieval text and lore.

Shadow
Friday, June 17th, 2016, 01:45 AM
Changing images of the wild woman.

https://www.academia.edu/20559306/From_Page_to_Print_the_transformation_of _the_wild_woman_in_early_modern_Northern _engravings

Zana