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Renwein
Sunday, April 1st, 2012, 05:43 PM
Probably many of you (brits) read this BBC article in the week already. ;)


http://news.bbcimg.co.uk/media/images/58959000/jpg/_58959436_thrones.jpg
Game of Thrones and The Lord of the Rings are set in fantasy worlds, so why does everybody speak with a British accent?

A lot of British people will not have heard of Game of Thrones.

This tale of family strife and royal intrigue in a fantasy world called Westeros has been a big hit on HBO in the US. Millions watched the first series, justifying the movie-like budget poured into the production.

The second series of the show, which starts on HBO on Sunday, and Sky Atlantic on Monday, is the subject of much more hype in the US than in the UK.

But while aimed at a US audience and adapted from the books of American author George RR Martin, Game of Thrones is entirely dominated by British accents.

UK accents also dominate in The Lord of the Rings and the forthcoming Hobbit films.

It contradicts the traditional stereotype of British accents cropping up mostly as bad guys and upper crust types in period drama.

"It's such an ingrained part of fantasy and science fiction that I'm a little surprised when those kind of characters don't speak in British accents," says Matt Zoller Seitz, TV critic for New York magazine and Vulture.com.

"In the fantasy realm they could have any kind of accent but British does seem to be the default."
Ian McKellen as Gandalf and Elijah Wood as Frodo in The Lord of the Rings An American-accented Gandalf might not have pleased fans

A British accent is sufficiently exotic to transport the viewer to a different reality, argues Seitz, while still being comprehensible to a global audience.

The neutral Mid-Western accent is still what counts as "normal" in the US dominated entertainment industry. A British accent provides a "splash of otherness", when set alongside it.

American viewers of Game of Thrones also get a coherent range of accents from all of the British Isles.

Those from the north of the fantasy world tend to speak mostly with either northern English or Scottish accents. In the first series, Yorkshiremen Sean Bean and Mark Addy played their parts with their own accents. There are also characters with an Irish tinge.

British audiences are used to seeing imported US shows - like House or The Wire - with British actors doing American accents.

But Game of Thrones, much of which was filmed in Northern Ireland, has only one American actor as a central character, Peter Dinklage. He does his part with a rather posh English accent.

"A New York accent wouldn't work," Dinklage, who was born in New Jersey and plays scheming Tyrion Lannister, recently explained to the Calgary Herald. "It doesn't sound right."

And if you go on the forums you see American fans' expectations have been met.

"I'm not an expert by any means, but what I find interesting is that they sound to my American ears to be not only British accents, but regional British accents," writes Independent George on the Ice and Fire Forum.

http://news.bbcimg.co.uk/media/images/59387000/jpg/_59387685_daenerys2_skyat.jpg
This character is from the south so speaks with a southern English accent

"The North sounds vaguely Scottish to me, Robert sounded like he was from Northern England, I know the DVD commentary track to episode six said that the Vale was cast as predominantly Welsh (though I couldn't identify a Welsh accent if my life depended on it)."

He adds: "Hopefully one of our British readers can set me straight. For natives, it could be as jarring as watching a western where everybody's speaking Italian. Oh, wait... "

Martin, the creator of the Song of Ice And Fire series of books, was inspired a great deal by European Medieval history," says Stephen Tierney, administrator of the Game of Thrones UK fansite.

"As such his characters reflect that and if you read the books and listen to the cadence of the characters voices you will find that they do sound more regionally British than they do American.

"Since it is a mediaeval fantasy saga with more emphasis on the characters than on witches and wizards I do think the regional British accents work very well. The show does place a lot of emphasis on a north/south divide and seeing the northern House Stark going up against the distinctly southern House Lannister provides a great contrast and helps the viewers know which side everyone is on."

It's not just fantasy that has developed a British accent default setting, even for American audiences. For ancient Greece and Rome - as seen in everything from Spartacus to HBO/BBC's Rome series - audiences again expect UK accents. One has only to cast one's mind back to Joaquin Phoenix's accent in Gladiator for a classic example.

http://news.bbcimg.co.uk/media/images/59387000/jpg/_59387686_snow2_skyat.jpg
While this character is from the north and speaks with a more northern English accent

Some have a simple explanation for the British invasion of fantasy land - Kevin Costner.

Although not strictly part of the genre, his US/British accent in Robin Hood Prince of Thieves was so jarring, and out of historical context, that it stood as a warning to all future directors. Or so the theory goes.

Martin has said English accents work best for fantasy, as the genre is rooted in the Middle Ages.

"It's full of castles and lords and swords and knights and all the other trappings that we associate with England in this country. It seems natural. It would be hard to do with a group of actors who had thick Southern accents," he has commented.

"You would think why not just film it in the states with famous American actors, especially since George RR Martin, who wrote the books originally, has been called the American Tolkien? You would think this is an American thing," says Dan Wright, producer of UK-based Game of Thrones fan show Thronecast.

"But originally the books were sourced and based around at least a working knowledge of British history, the War of the Roses and things like that, and that certainly comes out in the way the royal family is structured and that sort of thing."

But Game of Thrones is on a premium cable channel. There is still a long way to go before British actors are allowed to use their own accents on network television in mainstream roles.

Lisa De Moraes, TV critic of the Washington Post, believes the big US networks are reluctant to have characters speak with a foreign accent.

"They will make an exception with fantasy drama, or costume drama, but the need to pull in big audiences - and to have lead characters with broad appeal - means they will not allow British actors to use their natural accents."

original (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-17554816)


If fantasy is kind of about escapism, it's obvious: to go to a better place, you go where everyone is really British. :D

I haven't watched any of that series but will probably track it down sooner than later now...

raedwald
Sunday, April 1st, 2012, 06:31 PM
You said why do they all speak British, (English) well it could be thay we are the best!!!!

Sefo
Sunday, April 1st, 2012, 06:58 PM
I have often wondered this myself, being an American and all. For some reason, Americans think it would be weird to hear a guy with a Boston or NY accent in a Middle aged Germanic setting for a movie. :D

Forest_Dweller
Sunday, April 1st, 2012, 07:11 PM
Probably many of you (brits) read this BBC article in the week already. ;)



If fantasy is kind of about escapism, it's obvious: to go to a better place, you go where everyone is really British. :D

I haven't watched any of that series but will probably track it down sooner than later now...

I couldn't watch this, the relationship between Daenerys Targaryen and half breed Khal Drogo made me physically sick.

To bad Britain is no longer that place, soon the national dialect will be something like Dappy from Ndubs:thumbdown

The English accent has always been associated with prestige and nobility and as such fits well with films depicting ancient Kings and Queens. Also some of the most famous and well known fantasy stories especially in more recent years have come from England, Tolkien for example. You can also blame hollywood who have always depicted Brits as being more refined and sophisticated. Not to mention Shakespeare being one of the most influential play rights in modern times, many of his plays were set in medieval England aswell.

Autosomal Viking
Sunday, April 1st, 2012, 07:12 PM
British accents sound exotic, Old World, and pleasant to American ears, and if the movie is taking place before the late 1700's, we wouldn't exactly expect the characters to have American accents. That being said, it doesn't mean we would want to abandon our accents.

Elessar
Sunday, April 1st, 2012, 07:20 PM
When I watch fantasy, read fantasy, I always prefer the British over American accent. It's just natural, British is proper English, Britain is home to our (anglophone) most beloved fantasy stories. Any other accent just sounds out of place.
Take for instance in the game Skyrim. Their accents are horrible, a pathetic attempt at some kind of germano-scandinavian cliche motif, it simply doesn't work.

There's something subconscious about the use of accent & fantasty. We really want to return to the days of Lord and Land, King and Queen, the days of chivalry and knighthood, but we're too damn proud to admit it

Odins Hammer
Sunday, April 1st, 2012, 07:27 PM
@Autosomal Viking: I learnt that the American accent is the way the British talked in the 18th century. The British accent developed further, they dropped some vowels and the "r", but the American English is more "original" today if you want to say so.

Plantagenet
Sunday, April 1st, 2012, 07:33 PM
It is a strange that we prefer the British English accents in fantasy settings. Some may say that it is because the British English accent is the older, or original accent.

According to this article, it is actually the American accents that are closer to the "older" or "original" British accent and the ones in Britain have gone more drastic change:

http://www.nicholasjohnpatrick.com/post/767354896/did-americans-in-1776-have-british-accents

With that said, if we are trying to create the atmosphere of an older world, wouldn't American English be more appropriate in light of this information? This is of course ignoring the complexity of regional accents, both in America and Britain, but speaking in a generalized sense, it seems to be true.

I still prefer the British English accents for my fantasy.

Sefo
Sunday, April 1st, 2012, 07:36 PM
^^ Wow I did not know that. :|

That is awesome. So all this time Americans are given crap about not "speaking proper English" by the Brits and in actuality we ARE the ones speaking proper English?

I swear the irony is going to kill me. :D

Odins Hammer
Sunday, April 1st, 2012, 07:40 PM
When Hollywood made movies about ancient Roman history in the 50s and 60s, actors spoke with British accent as well. Shouldn't they have rather talked with an Italian accent?

Forest_Dweller
Sunday, April 1st, 2012, 07:49 PM
^^ Wow I did not know that. :|

That is awesome. So all this time Americans are given crap about not "speaking proper English" by the Brits and in actuality we ARE the ones speaking proper English?

I swear the irony is going to kill me. :D

Don't believe everything you read on the internet;) So let me get this straight the original English accent was more similar to how modern Americans sound today? Sounds a bit far fetched to me. If that was the case modern Americans wouldn't have such different ways of pronouncing and spelling words.

Plantagenet
Sunday, April 1st, 2012, 07:53 PM
Don't believe everything you read on the internet;) So let me get this straight the original English accent was more similar to how modern Americans sound today? Sounds a bit far fetched to me. If that was the case modern Americans wouldn't have such different ways of pronouncing and spelling words.

The source of the information is The Cambridge History of the English Language so in all likelihood it is true. This doesn't take into consideration spelling or regional accents of course.

renownedwolf
Sunday, April 1st, 2012, 08:01 PM
zfaEGU45lKA

Forest_Dweller
Sunday, April 1st, 2012, 08:08 PM
The source of the information is The Cambridge History of the English Language so in all likelihood it is true. This doesn't take into consideration spelling or regional accents of course.

Well maybe, but it just seems strange to me that the English language and grammer has stayed the same in England since the middle ages, while the American-English accent has changed quite a lot over time. Usually languages change and diversify when a populations moves away from original homeland and not the other way around.

RoyBatty
Sunday, April 1st, 2012, 08:15 PM
If fantasy is kind of about escapism, it's obvious: to go to a better place, you go where everyone is really British. :D


They use Brit accents in the US because, as is stated in the article, it is sufficiently furrin to impress the native Media Consumers. :D

However there be a dark side because British accents are also favoured for use wiv:

- Hollywood Nazis
- Hollywood Russian Gangsters (Steven Berkoff's practically made a career out of this) :P
- Hollywood Furrin Criminals and Megalomaniacs

:-O

Sefo
Sunday, April 1st, 2012, 08:16 PM
Well maybe, but it just seems strange to me that the English language and grammer has stayed the same in England since the middle ages, while the American-English accent has changed quite a lot over time. Usually languages change and diversify when a populations moves away from original homeland and not the other way around.

Well according to that source the English language has not stayed the same at all. Apparently you guys are one that have changed in the past couple hundred years.

So basically, you Brits need to go back to speaking English again. :D

:thumbsup

Forest_Dweller
Sunday, April 1st, 2012, 08:29 PM
Well according to that source the English language has not stayed the same at all. Apparently you guys are one that have changed in the past couple hundred years.

So basically, you Brits need to go back to speaking English again. :D

:thumbsup

Granted English has adopted many foreign words over time, however the grammer and spelling (as far as I know) has always remained more or less the same while American English has not. I'm talking about modern English though, not the transition from Anglo-Saxon English to modern English.

Sefo
Sunday, April 1st, 2012, 08:45 PM
I understand what your saying, but I'm speaking simply about accents and pronunciations. :thumbup

Linden
Sunday, April 1st, 2012, 08:51 PM
I am sorry to disappoint those to whom this may concern, but there are very few accents spoken within the present borders of the United States which even faintly resemble the accents spoken by the original English settlers. You must bear in mind that although the first settlers set sail from only a small number of English ports, they descended from towns spread all across our nation. The first settlements would have been filled with men and women speaking in thick Berkshire, Cambridgeshire, Norfolk and Yorkshire accents. After time these accents amalgamated to form an accent which has been likened to that spoken by the people of Cornwall in the south west of England.

The impact of both mass German and Irish immigration is quite apparent to me when I hear any one of the American accents. Nonetheless, there are a great number of American accents which are pleasing to the ear (the Georgian accent being my favourite).

Granraude
Sunday, April 1st, 2012, 08:52 PM
Go tell a Scouser or a Geordie that they are not speaking proper English. Would have been fun to watch that discussion.

Sefo
Sunday, April 1st, 2012, 09:04 PM
I'm not the one saying it. Apparently a pretty respected source from your own country is saying it. ;)

Linden
Sunday, April 1st, 2012, 09:07 PM
Go tell a Scouser or a Geordie that they are not speaking proper English. Would have been fun to watch that discussion.

It’s funny you’ve mentioned the ‘Geordies’ (:D). The ‘Geordie’/Newcastle accent is supposedly the least altered accent in England. It’s the same today as it was long before the Americas were even discovered.

But yes, if somebody were to tell a ‘Geordie’ that he doesn’t speak proper English you’d hear two loud bangs. The first being the sound of his fist making contact with their face, the second being the sound of them falling to the ground. :| :D

Huginn ok Muninn
Sunday, April 1st, 2012, 09:17 PM
The idea that Americans speak with an "older" accent is without proof. And which Americans? Those in the backwoods of Vermont or West Virginia might be isolated and homogeneously English/Scottish enough to make the argument plausible, but the speech of New York/New Jersey? That accent in itself is proof to me that large scale immigration wipes out the local culture. Listening to the Dago/Jew accent, as I see that being, is extremely grating and annoying to me. Sure, maybe there are older elements there, but the whole thing just reminds me of mobsters, and certainly not the olden times of northern Europe pre-1500 or so.

That's really the point, then.. where does the accent take the listener? Does it take them to the world of The Godfather? John Wayne's West? The Leave-it-to-Beaver 50s? Almost any American accent would would put you in a place that did not exist before 1607 at the very earliest. Game of Thrones, Lord of the Rings, and indeed most fantasy literature seems to place itself between 800 and 1400 or so, and in an environment that is definitely Northern European. American accents, whatever anyone might say, just dissociate listeners completely from that environment. For the same reason, you can also forget using the Aussie/New Zealand accent. Those places were not European in that era either.

Authentic English from the era of Chaucer and before would be mostly unintelligible to the masses, but of course the use of the classical English accent is just a device, and does not pretend to be authentic. It does perhaps have its origins in some of the earliest popular films which depict that era, such as The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938), which employed mainly English or Irish actors, in a definitely English setting. What's interesting though, is that many of the Merry Men were played by Americans, such as Alan Hale as Little John (listen to his less-than-English accent while perched in the tree at 1:46):

LrwaBzIbR_U

But of course, at court, everyone is very English indeed:

Evof-iVDOwQ

It may be that the more common Merry Men sounding more "American" is meant to mimic the class struggle, or to cause Americans to identify with Robin and his band. This might also be the genesis of the idea that the baddies usually sound like upper-crusty Brits. ;)

Germaid
Sunday, April 1st, 2012, 09:34 PM
When Hollywood made movies about ancient Roman history in the 50s and 60s, actors spoke with British accent as well. Shouldn't they have rather talked with an Italian accent?

Also a few years ago when they did the HBO series Rome. If I remember correctly, almost all actors had a British accent (I cannot distinguish between the different GB accents).

MidgardPatriot
Sunday, April 1st, 2012, 09:36 PM
English sounds more ancient, less modernized.

Huginn ok Muninn
Sunday, April 1st, 2012, 09:54 PM
Even if one only goes back to 1400 or so, this is what one would hear in England:

QE0MtENfOMU

Of course, the accent as spoken at the time is anyone's guess, but I find it interesting that both in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle excerpt posted above by renownedwolf and in this one, the accent seems at times to sound almost Scandinavian. I wonder then, if Scandinavian languages, being set in an area of Europe more protected from invasions and foreign influences, might reflect speech patterns more closely resembling those of our more ancient ancestors.

Powmia
Sunday, April 1st, 2012, 10:18 PM
I also wondered this.

After thinking about it though, "fantasy" originated with fairy tales and the like. When we think of fantasy we think of knights and dragons which we associate with England. Maybe because their Monarchy lasted the longest?

Our imagination is just a potential of our capabilities.

So I think it is just a lack of creativity or imagination on the producers part.

On a different note; What did the Franks speak and what did it sound like?

Devils__Advocate
Sunday, April 1st, 2012, 10:21 PM
Americans speak original English compared to the English themselves? Such an absurdity that one hopes it is only an April Fools joke.

To hear original English in the south, you need only go to Somerset or Norfolk.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gPlpphT7n9s

RoyBatty
Sunday, April 1st, 2012, 10:29 PM
Go tell a Scouser


that they are not speaking proper English. Would have been fun to watch that discussion.

Not much to see, it's debatable how English they are.

Sefo
Sunday, April 1st, 2012, 10:33 PM
Americans speak original English compared to the English themselves? Such an absurdity that one hopes it is only an April Fools joke.

To hear original English in the south, you need only go to Somerset or Norfolk.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gPlpphT7n9s


Perhaps Cambridge was simply playing a cruel joke on you then...

They dont exactly seem like the joking type. ;)

gormsgast
Sunday, April 1st, 2012, 11:22 PM
Going off on a tangent, for many years I was annoyed at Americans using different words for describing the same things, for example, we say "Autumn", they say "Fall". However we in England always used the word Fall and for some unknown reason adopted the the Latin version "Autumn" sometime in the 18th century if memory serves me well. Therefore many words used by Americans are true English, it's us who have changed, and not always for the better.

Linden
Sunday, April 1st, 2012, 11:43 PM
Perhaps Cambridge was simply playing a cruel joke on you then...

They dont exactly seem like the joking type. ;)

You must surely realise that this is but one argument which is defying the consensus that the accents in the most rural regions of England have been virtually untouched since any westerner knew that the continent on which you reside existed. Although one professor at the university of Cambridge theorised that the American accent has remained quintessentially English (despite astronomical non-English immigration), many others also working at Cambridge disagree with him.

I’ve read a great deal about the ‘British divergence’ theory. The information used to reinforce this approach is dated and full of inconsistencies to say the least, and only gained acceptance in the public eye following its ‘endorsement’ by Joseph P. Kennedy during a visit to England during the 1930s.

The tone you employ throughout almost all of your posts is quite acrimonious, especially considering you know very little of this topic. It’s best not to hang upon the words of one man when you’re in this situation.

Perhaps I'll add a ;) or :thumbup to take the edge off this comment.

Why do Americans enjoy the sound of an English voice? Is it not obvious? There’s a certain antique like quality to a number of our accents, which may allow the listener to a hark back to the times in which the world was in a state of far less ruin. In many ways it’s like sucking on a Werther’s caramel.

Sefo
Sunday, April 1st, 2012, 11:50 PM
Thanks for adding that. :thumbup ... sure got your point across....


And I'm not "acrimonious" (i can use big words too) just because you disagree with what is being said. Take it up with the man who wrote the article.

Thusnelda
Monday, April 2nd, 2012, 03:11 AM
Iīd love to watch some fantasy epos in British language (to hear their accents) but all fantasy series and -movies Iīve ever seen were dubbed in German language. :D But anyway, German isnīt the worst choice for fantasy movies because proper German has that hard and harsh vibe which fits to the often unforgiving atmosphere and scenarios of fantasy movies. :thumbup


I couldn't watch this, the relationship between Daenerys Targaryen and half breed Khal Drogo made me physically sick.

I have to agree with you to 100%, it was a hard pill to swallow while I watched "Game of Thrones". :thumbdown Khal Drogo and his tribe, the Dothraki, were depicted as clones of the Arabs. Even their language in the series smells like Arab. I presume that it was no coincidence that Daenerys Targayen is depicted as a light-blonde, blue eyed Nordid women who falls in love with the desert Arab-like people. :thumbdown There must be some underlying race-mixing agenda behind "Game of Thrones". :( It ruined a great part of the series for me because the rest was really good and enjoyable (Joe Snow! ;)).

http://24.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_ljre0nPzTn1qimagwo1_500.jpg

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-QGsVRRIDUzE/TeWq36uPJtI/AAAAAAAADpc/YgJN1cCF7m8/s1600/Dany-Drogo.jpg

http://26.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_lkoioc1Lv81qjyvkzo1_500.jpg

:throwup

Ilva
Monday, April 2nd, 2012, 08:10 AM
Probably many of you (brits) read this BBC article in the week already. ;)

I don't see why the writer of the BBC article finds it surprising that actors in LOTR and "The Hobbit" should have English regional accents: the books were written by an Englishman and according to some interpretations depict a fantasy English land:thumbup

Wulfhere
Monday, April 2nd, 2012, 09:43 AM
@Autosomal Viking: I learnt that the American accent is the way the British talked in the 18th century. The British accent developed further, they dropped some vowels and the "r", but the American English is more "original" today if you want to say so.

That isn't true. The American accent is derived from the West Country accent, which retains rhotic "r" to this day.

It's Americans who dropped vowels, not the English.

RoyBatty
Monday, April 2nd, 2012, 11:21 AM
I don't see why the writer of the BBC article finds it surprising that actors in LOTR and "The Hobbit" should have English regional accents: the books were written by an Englishman and according to some interpretations depict a fantasy English land:thumbup

To us it wouldn't seem surprising but to THE BBC it may seem surprising :D

Keep in mind that the BBC is a center of Cultural-Marxism and Cultural and Historical revisionism.

In other words, they are Politically Correct and re-imagining and re-interpreting history to "include" a Multicultural Utopia and Society is their game.

Germaid
Monday, April 2nd, 2012, 05:57 PM
I presume that it was no coincidence that Daenerys Targayen is depicted as a light-blonde, blue eyed Nordid women who falls in love with the desert Arab-like people. :thumbdown

Yes, I also noticed. :( That was the only bad point about the series, otherwise it was great. I can't say anything about the English accents, as I only watched the German-dubbed version.


** SPOILER **

Thusnelda, I hope seeing her suffocate him with a pillow alleviated your misery a little, didn't it? ;)

Sybren
Monday, April 2nd, 2012, 06:27 PM
I presume that it was no coincidence that Daenerys Targayen is depicted as a light-blonde, blue eyed Nordid women who falls in love with the desert Arab-like people.
She looks strange to me with blonde hair, she certainly is no Nordid type.

Not that it matters for the general public. It is indeed yet again propaganda for the multiculture.

Thusnelda
Monday, April 2nd, 2012, 09:33 PM
** SPOILER **

Thusnelda, I hope seeing her suffocate him with a pillow alleviated your misery a little, didn't it? ;)
:D Well yes, but I initially knew that this gypsy healer witch with her promise of "eternal life" is going to do a bad job...:P The only one I hated more than the Dothraki is that arrogant teen snob of a king, Geoffrey, who decided to kill Ned Stark. Geoffrey resembles historic figures like Caligula or Nero. I hope he dies in the second season...the hard way! :P

Sybren: Yes, thatīs true. The actress who played Daeneris doesnīt seem like a natural blonde to me. But the masses who are unaware of ethnic issues (in contrast to us) will take her as a blonde "Nordic-like" woman who falls in love with savage Arab-like people. :thumbdown

Granraude
Monday, April 2nd, 2012, 09:41 PM
Sybren: Yes, thatīs true. The actress who played Daeneris doesnīt seem like a natural blonde to me. But the masses who are unaware of ethnic issues (in contrast to us) will take her as a blonde "Nordic-like" woman who falls in love with savage Arab-like people. :thumbdown

Emilia Clarke:

http://www.filmweb.no/bilder/multimedia/archive/00217/Emilia_Clarke_fra_T_217006n.jpg

Looks as lot better natural. The white-blonde hair looks off on most people.

They are obviously trying to portray the good old "power through wedlock", in a little multiculti version.

Æmeric
Monday, April 2nd, 2012, 09:44 PM
Well if the film is made primarily for American audiences you wouldn't want an American accent but the British accent would still be English (language wise) & understandable. Also, from the pov of an American male, English/British accents make women seem more sexier & I suppose American females might feel the same way about males with English accents. ;)

celticviking
Tuesday, April 3rd, 2012, 08:51 AM
Lord of the Rings used American, Australian and New Zealand actors too.
Same as the Hobbit, Hercules, Xena, Narnia and Legend of the Seeker.

Game of Thrones was not what I thought it would be.

I asked for some classifying here.


Daenerys "Dany" Targaryen (Emilia Clarke): Atlantid + Reduced Cro-Magnon(Paleo-Atlantid).
http://forums.skadi.net/showthread.php?t=145783


Nikolaj Coster-Waldau and Viggo Mortensen are Dannish.
Mikael Persbrandt is Swedish.

Nebelwerfer
Thursday, April 5th, 2012, 11:31 AM
My guess is that its Shakespeare and Charles Dickens related. Historical hollywood films seem to utilize British accents too.


Yes, thatīs true. The actress who played Daeneris doesnīt seem like a natural blonde to me. But the masses who are unaware of ethnic issues (in contrast to us) will take her as a blonde "Nordic-like" woman who falls in love with savage Arab-like people.

This will only interest the people who get their morals from watching films. If you even watch television at all you are probably already subverted. The stuff they broadcast now appears solely for the benefit of making immigrants think they are equal or superior. Just as well we invented the internet as well as everything else.

Ilva
Friday, April 6th, 2012, 08:55 AM
My guess is that its Shakespeare and Charles Dickens related. Historical hollywood films seem to utilize British accents too.



This will only interest the people who get their morals from watching films. If you even watch television at all you are probably already subverted. The stuff they broadcast now appears solely for the benefit of making immigrants think they are equal or superior. Just as well we invented the internet as well as everything else.

I agree. I gave up watching tv ages ago, I found it was giving me dyspepsia.
The incredible rubbish that is disseminated via the tv for the uninformed and unfortunately never- to- be- enlightened if they keep watching it.
Yes my stomach is doing better!:P

Ilva
Friday, April 6th, 2012, 01:48 PM
The idea that Americans speak with an "older" accent is without proof. And which Americans? Those in the backwoods of Vermont or West Virginia might be isolated and homogeneously English/Scottish enough to make the argument plausible, but the speech of New York/New Jersey? That accent in itself is proof to me that large scale immigration wipes out the local culture. Listening to the Dago/Jew accent, as I see that being, is extremely grating and annoying to me. Sure, maybe there are older elements there, but the whole thing just reminds me of mobsters, and certainly not the olden times of northern Europe pre-1500 or so.

That's really the point, then.. where does the accent take the listener? Does it take them to the world of The Godfather? John Wayne's West? The Leave-it-to-Beaver 50s? Almost any American accent would would put you in a place that did not exist before 1607 at the very earliest. Game of Thrones, Lord of the Rings, and indeed most fantasy literature seems to place itself between 800 and 1400 or so, and in an environment that is definitely Northern European. American accents, whatever anyone might say, just dissociate listeners completely from that environment. For the same reason, you can also forget using the Aussie/New Zealand accent.

That might be a little bit of a sweeping generalisation about the Antipodean accent. I assume you've heard Sam Neal speak, there are extremes of accent in NZ and in Australia. Not everyone sounds like Crocodile Dundee or Bryan Brown or even Russell Crowe. In Australia that accent was called an 'ocher' accent
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But of course, at court, everyone is very English indeed:

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It may be that the more common Merry Men sounding more "American" is meant to mimic the class struggle, or to cause Americans to identify with Robin and his band. This might also be the genesis of the idea that the baddies usually sound like upper-crusty Brits. ;)

gormsgast
Friday, April 6th, 2012, 02:00 PM
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violent Race, aren't we? Good job, otherwise we would have been overrun more times than we could imagine.

Forest_Dweller
Sunday, April 8th, 2012, 12:13 AM
Iīd love to watch some fantasy epos in British language (to hear their accents) but all fantasy series and -movies Iīve ever seen were dubbed in German language. :D But anyway, German isnīt the worst choice for fantasy movies because proper German has that hard and harsh vibe which fits to the often unforgiving atmosphere and scenarios of fantasy movies. :thumbup


I have to agree with you to 100%, it was a hard pill to swallow while I watched "Game of Thrones". :thumbdown Khal Drogo and his tribe, the Dothraki, were depicted as clones of the Arabs. Even their language in the series smells like Arab. I presume that it was no coincidence that Daenerys Targayen is depicted as a light-blonde, blue eyed Nordid women who falls in love with the desert Arab-like people. :thumbdown There must be some underlying race-mixing agenda behind "Game of Thrones". :( It ruined a great part of the series for me because the rest was really good and enjoyable (Joe Snow! ;)).


It did look good, it's just ashame that even our European fantasy films and historical dramas are being infected with this propaganda. I started watching Camelot aswell and after about five episodes I couldn't watch it anymore, even though it started off quite well. To have negro knights in a film set in the 6th century was just laughable and I just couldn't take it seriously anymore. It was strange how it seemed to be absent of any other minority other than blacks aswell. The reason they do it though is because these films remind us of our identity, they remind us that we have a rich and diminishing heritage and so they try to pervert even our history itself hoping the masses will stupidly accept it.

It's true that English and German has a certain harsh quality to it, which is good for dramatic acting.

ChaosLord
Sunday, April 8th, 2012, 03:59 AM
I think it's because the fantasy movies represent the "old world" in the Western Culture's psyche and it's more aesthetically pleasing to the ears to hear an English accent as opposed to a New York, Chicago, or Southern accent.

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_eYzGKbVz3qk/TT1L6EwROXI/AAAAAAAAACc/7NFI4JZsDB8/s1600/Ultramarines_movie.jpg

The Warhammer 40K material, although produced in Britain, also emphasizes English accents. Even though it's set in a far futuristic setting, it's still aesthetically pleasing.

leRoux
Sunday, April 8th, 2012, 04:02 AM
Because that accent that the High Elves in Skyrim have is purely awesome, it's almost the same as the one Imperial officers have in Star Wars.

Hearing that accent makes me want to go back in time and join the Redcoats, or the Dragoons.

KingOvGermania
Sunday, April 8th, 2012, 04:28 AM
I think, in addition to the other reasons mentioned above, it's because modern fantasy fiction has its roots fundamentally in Anglo-Saxon culture, mythology and archetypes, going all the way back to Tolkien and CS Lewis (No offense to non-Anglo-Saxons at all, I am not AS whatsoever, just speaking my mind)

gormsgast
Tuesday, April 10th, 2012, 01:00 PM
It did look good, it's just ashame that even our European fantasy films and historical dramas are being infected with this propaganda. I started watching Camelot aswell and after about five episodes I couldn't watch it anymore, even though it started off quite well. To have negro knights in a film set in the 6th century was just laughable and I just couldn't take it seriously anymore. It was strange how it seemed to be absent of any other minority other than blacks aswell. The reason they do it though is because these films remind us of our identity, they remind us that we have a rich and diminishing heritage and so they try to pervert even our history itself hoping the masses will stupidly accept it.


Despite my age, I enjoy these films/TV series depicting times of old even if the storyline is pure fiction, and like you I stopped watching Camelot after seeing Guinevere was a half chat plus of course the Black Knights. Totally ruined it, and haven't watched any more episodes. Another classic was Robin Hood starring Kevin Costner having a Moorish [Morgan Freeman] trusted sidekick. These production Companies definitely seem to have an agenda of subtly putting into the younger generations mind that these third worlders have always been an integral part of English/European History.
There were obviously some dark skinned People that either visited or came pillaging some Northern shores during those times, but were certainly not part of the indigenous Culture in any way especially a ruling class.
Hollywood and the BBC have a lot to answer for in trying to change the way things were, all covered up in the name of "entertainment".

KingBritannia
Tuesday, April 10th, 2012, 08:01 PM
If I put on a fantasy movie and the characters had American accents it would just seem too cheap and tacky and I'd turn it off. There's something that just fits with British accents and the fantasy world.