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Ælfrun
Wednesday, October 26th, 2011, 05:14 PM
I was looking for ways to coat my drinking horn, and I came across this really great article about horn carving and coating.


Period Drinking Horns : Being a synopsis on how drinking horns were made and carved with period tools and how similarily can be done in modern times
“Prompt in his office, the man who held the horn of bright mead poured out its sweetness.” From the story of Beowulf 5th to 6th century
Possessing a drinking horn is more than just having a container for your drink, it is a important accessory in defining yourself. This article will provide you with some useful information on what drinking horns are, how they were made and how they can be made now.

Here is the full PDF article (http://www.ardchreag.org/documents/A&S/HornCarving.pdf)

GeistFaust
Wednesday, October 26th, 2011, 05:21 PM
A Drinking Horn sounds awesome I want one for Christmas. The other cool thing about it is if there is ever a fight I can pick it up and crack someone over the head with it. I am sure the original users of the Drinking Horn utilized it for such a purpose many a time.

Ælfrun
Wednesday, October 26th, 2011, 05:24 PM
A Drinking Horn sounds awesome I want one for Christmas. The other cool thing about it is if there is ever a fight I can pick it up and crack someone over the head with it. I am sure the original users of the Drinking Horn utilized it for such a purpose many a time.

I do not know if they were used as weapons but they are really easy to come by. I bought mine in a metaphysical store, as I do not have the resources to make one from scratch. I just coated mine with bees wax, and it now smells like honey which will go nice with the mead ;)

Weitgereister
Wednesday, October 26th, 2011, 09:16 PM
There's a cool mead brewery/cafe near me (http://starrlightmead.com) that sells drinking horns for a reasonable amount - I may just have to pick one up! (along with a case or two of mead :thumbup)

I'd love to attempt to carve my own, as I'm sure it would be quite a spiritual experience. However, I'm not the most artistic man - someone has to appreciate the art, right?

What runes (if any) would you adorn your horn with?

Ælfrun
Wednesday, October 26th, 2011, 09:41 PM
What runes (if any) would you adorn your horn with?

I would have to say Ansuz, Sowulo, Isa, Dagaz, Othila

Ocko
Thursday, October 27th, 2011, 02:31 PM
How does one carve them as they are pretty thin, at least the one's I saw in a Texas cowboy shop. (they were for decoration and from longhorns).

I think the idea of drinking mead from a horn is to get a connection to the horned God and mead (spiced up with psychedelic herbs like Bilsenkraut) will catapult one immidiately into the sphere of the Gods. Though not to get drunk like people get today but in a religious meaning to get catapult into a state where you easily can communicate with the gods whithout getting regularly drunk. (comparable to the tobacco smoking of our indian friends when they hold council and do important deliberations)

It is known that before people held Thing there was a horn making the round. The council mead was loaded with different herbs in the mead which the participants, full grown men and head of clans and families, used to elevate themselves into the sphere of the Gods to get useful intuitions so the advice and Rat which was found was in line with the Gods. For that of course, no orderly drunkeness was permitted. The free and strong people kept a sort of control while being in a higher state and then had different insights.

If one is using a horn to drink ordinary alcohol that is neo-paganism and not what our ancestors did.

Might be enjoyable though.

Hersir
Thursday, October 27th, 2011, 05:08 PM
How does one carve them as they are pretty thin, at least the one's I saw in a Texas cowboy shop. (they were for decoration and from longhorns).

You just hand pick one which is thicker. I have a big blowing horn I am gonna decorate.

Scario
Thursday, October 27th, 2011, 09:08 PM
There are different ways to coat, or not to coat a horn for use. The one I use, fill with bleach and let sit overnight, drain, rinse. If need be, repeat. Fill with mead or a beer and let sit overnight, drain, rinse. If need be, repeat. No wax or other substance is needed to line the horn. Some people use chemicals or shellacs, bad idea. Also, wax sometimes degrades or chips off or even bubbles up. Then you have to deal with the way the horn is anyways or recoat.

Scario
Thursday, October 27th, 2011, 09:10 PM
On thickness of horns, they may seem thin, but are not. I have ground down a buffalo horn for use as a cup and took off lots of layers and still had some, same with a cow horn I had. And still carved into them.

Ælfrun
Thursday, October 27th, 2011, 10:33 PM
Mine is extremely thin, but I bought it already hollowed out, so I just coated it. I am hoping that the beeswax stays on it, because it was a challenge to spread it out evenly inside the horn.

bloodmoon
Friday, October 28th, 2011, 12:51 AM
This is very helpful, as I have been meaning to carve a horn for Wotan. Thank you very much for posting! Hail Wotan!

Hersir
Friday, October 28th, 2011, 08:15 PM
I have a jig saw, so I cut some antler. Not all turned out great, I guess I need a finer blade, or just use a hacksaw.

Was thinking about trying to make some small knives, or pendants. Need to take out the core if I want to put a blade inside, but I read somewhere on the net you could boil the antler to make the innards soft, and press the knife blade in and the core will harden again. Maybe you could also apply some epoxy?

And here is my blowing horn, want to decorate it a bit. The weapons are a seax and the axe from the mammen find (Paul Chen). Sorry for the lousy images just, it was taken on my cellphone.

109589

109590

Ælfrun
Friday, October 28th, 2011, 08:20 PM
Nice horns, the colours are very rich. what is that axe head made from? I really like the artwork on it also.

Hersir
Friday, October 28th, 2011, 08:26 PM
Nice Horns, the colours are very rich. what is that axe blade made from?

Copy of the Mammen axe. Original axe in the Copenhagen National Museum, Denmark circa 970-971. They also found a sword in the grave, but I only have a picture of it in a book, not aware of anyone making a replica of it. The axe head is a Petersen Type G. It's made from some grade of steel, not sure exactly what grade. It's a pretty cheap axe. The handle isn't great, I should change it.

http://www.myarmoury.com/images/reviews/casi_mammen_b.jpg
http://www.myarmoury.com/images/reviews/casi_mammen_c.jpg

The head reminds me of this one from Aarhus
http://i.imgur.com/rbZCh.jpg

Neophyte
Friday, October 28th, 2011, 08:27 PM
Was thinking about trying to make some small knives, or pendants. Need to take out the core if I want to put a blade inside, but I read somewhere on the net you could boil the antler to make the innards soft, and press the knife blade in and the core will harden again. Maybe you could also apply some epoxy?

If you want to keep things natural you can make a glue from pine resin and charcoal.

http://www.survivaltopics.com/survival/making-pitch-glue

Ælfrun
Friday, October 28th, 2011, 08:28 PM
Copy of the Mammen axe. Original axe in the Copenhagen National Museum, Denmark circa 970-971. They also found a sword in the grave, but I only have a picture of it in a book, not aware of anyone making a replica of it. The axe head is a Petersen Type G. It's made from some grade of steel, not sure exactly what grade. It's a pretty cheap axe. The handle isn't great, I should change it.

http://www.myarmoury.com/images/reviews/casi_mammen_b.jpg
http://www.myarmoury.com/images/reviews/casi_mammen_c.jpg

I am absolutely blown away by the artwork!

Ocko
Friday, October 28th, 2011, 08:35 PM
Traditionally the glue would not be epoxy but the hoofs of the deer. You boil them until there is only a paste left and then apply it and let it cool out.

It is supposedly a very good glue.

Hersir
Friday, October 28th, 2011, 08:36 PM
Check out http://www.google.no/search?rlz=1C1SKPL_enNO454NO454&gcx=w&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8&q=mammen+style

Ælfrun
Friday, October 28th, 2011, 08:38 PM
Check out http://www.google.no/search?rlz=1C1SKPL_enNO454NO454&gcx=w&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8&q=mammen+style

Would make amazing tattoos!

Neophyte
Friday, October 28th, 2011, 08:43 PM
Traditionally the glue would not be epoxy but the hoofs of the deer. You boil them until there is only a paste left and then apply it and let it cool out.

It is supposedly a very good glue.

Around here I believe that glue was traditionally made from the collagen in fish skin. They boiled the skins in water and then strained away the solids and cooked the broth until it reduced to a paste. Same principle I guess, except from hoofs consisting mostly of keratin.

But I do not think that those glues hold up very well against water.

SpearBrave
Friday, October 28th, 2011, 09:08 PM
Most Germanic knives from the Viking era were not glued instead the tang was forged long and peened over at the pomel. This would be much stronger than glue and would not come out.;)

raedwald
Monday, October 31st, 2011, 07:30 PM
We have two drinking horns, one bought in Glastonbury and one in Germany, we shall be using one tonight, and again on 11-11-11 for our ancestors...

Wassail

Raedwald..