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Gardisten
Tuesday, October 11th, 2011, 09:05 PM
Another example of the state's interference in the internal matters of the Amish--and the willingness of the leftist mainstream media to pounce on the story and sensationalize it...


BERGHOLZ, Ohio (AP) In an unusually public display of trouble among the traditionally guarded Amish, a breakaway group is accused of attacking mainstream members by cutting off their beards and hair, which carry spiritual significance in the faith.

The leader of the breakaway group told The Associated Press in a rare interview this week that one recent attack was a religious issue stemming from long-standing resentment of his group's treatment.

The goal was to send a message to Amish in Holmes County that they should be ashamed of themselves for their treatment of the community, which has been called a cult, said Sam Mullet, 66.

"We'd like to get up in the morning, be left alone, live like normal people," Mullet said Monday, speaking at his farm outside Bergholz, a village of about 700 residents where he established his community in 1995. "They won't leave us be."

Authorities in Jefferson County on Saturday arrested two of Mullet's sons, 38-year-old Johnny Mullet and 26-year-old Lester Mullet, and another man from the community, 53-year-old Levi Miller, on burglary and kidnapping warrants out of nearby Holmes County, home to the world's largest Amish community.

The three men had a hearing Tuesday and were to be moved to Holmes County from the jail in Steubenville, about two hours away. Similar attacks against several people, some of them women, have occurred in recent weeks in the area, and authorities have said two more arrests are expected this week.

In one attack, men are accused of entering a home and saying, "Sam Mullet sent us here, and we're here on religious business," Jefferson County Sheriff Fred Abdalla said. Scissors and battery-powered clippers were used in the attack.

Amish men typically grow beards as adults and stop trimming them when they marry, and the beards are held in high esteem.

The Amish are known for careful selectivity of technology, their peaceful ideals and close guarding of their privacy. Such divisions are rare, and it's even rarer still for legal authorities to get involved.

http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5hDWFgtUUnTECBGp5osn334tgHsGg?docId =ec43550585194c44a580b0b84a6dbff7

Lew Skannon
Tuesday, October 11th, 2011, 09:47 PM
Amish is a problem for them. Its too old to be slandered as a cult, too pacifist to be classified as terrorist, too introvert to be classified as subversive, too self aware to destroy through decadence andconsumerism and too closed to infiltrate and destroy from the inside.

The enemy must truly hate the Amish with a passion!

Vindefense
Wednesday, October 12th, 2011, 01:58 AM
Religious leanings do not exempt one from the law.

The Amish are some of the most backwards people I have ever met. They defy the course of time and resist change and progress, fear is their god. From what I read in this article, the attacks were the product of zealots, breakaways that are resisting the advances occurring in larger sects. They are learning that a greater force exists, who's power is not arbitrary and who's law is not based on mere opinions.

Frostbite
Wednesday, October 12th, 2011, 02:03 AM
I followed this story. The cops were called by the Amish themselves, they didnt know what else to do. Even the police were surprised.


Amish or not you can't break into other peoples houses and assault them.

SpearBrave
Wednesday, October 12th, 2011, 02:20 AM
The Amish are Germanic people, they retain their language, they seek to harm no one, and they don't go looking for converts. Most importantly they are self relient as much as possible.

It is wrong that these men did this to prove a point. From what I know about the old order Amish ( I know some of them very well ) if they don't like the community they are in they move and set up a new settlement elsewhere. This is all by free choice if they leave or stay in a community.

Schneider
Wednesday, October 12th, 2011, 04:04 AM
One thing that people seem to forget when they talk about the Amish is that the Amish are human. They have the same issues we all have.

Yet while they are faced with the same challenges that we all are in life they have managed to maintain much of their traditions and culture. The Amish are a successful and growing group of communities, and they are not backwards at all. They are constantly innovating and improving every thing they are involved in.

Is self imposed reliance on renewable energy backwards?

Is a strong commitment to maintaining your culture and beliefs backwards?

Is separating your community from the influence of todays multicultural society backwards thinking?

Sigyn
Wednesday, October 12th, 2011, 04:16 AM
Am I the only one who finds it funny that the hair-cutters are called "Mullet"? :D


The Amish are some of the most backwards people I have ever met.
Well, it really varies from community to community. Most of the Amish, from what I've heard, are pacifistic people who just want to maintain their culture and traditions in peace.

Gardisten
Wednesday, October 12th, 2011, 04:57 AM
Looks like the original article has been revised so I will post the new one in its entirety...


Haircut assaults put glare on Ohio Amish community
By ANDREW WELSH-HUGGINS, Associated Press

BERGHOLZ, Ohio (AP) In an unusual public display of trouble among the traditionally guarded Amish, a breakaway group is accused of attacking mainstream members by cutting off their beards and hair, which carry spiritual significance in the faith.

At the center of the dispute is the group's 66-year-old old leader, Sam Mullet, who said he brought his followers from a community dozens of miles away 15 years ago so they could live by a stricter doctrine without interference.

Instead, he has gained a reputation for being authoritarian and vindictive, been accused of running a cult, and become embroiled in a feud with the sheriff after a custody dispute years ago.

"I wanted something better for my children and my grandchildren and the younger ones," he told The Associated Press in a rare interview this week. "I just wanted to drop out of sight and just take life easy."

Hair-cutting attacks against several people, some of them women, have occurred in recent weeks in the area. Amish men typically grow beards as adults and stop trimming them when they marry, and the beards and women's long hair are held in high esteem.

Mullet denies ordering beard-cuttings but says he wouldn't stop them. They're in response to incessant criticism he has received from other Amish religious leaders about his leadership practices, including excommunicating people in his own group, he said.

The goal was to send a message to Amish in Holmes County that they should be ashamed of themselves for their treatment of the community, which has been called a cult, Mullet said.

"We'd like to get up in the morning, be left alone, live like normal people," Mullet said Monday, speaking at his farm outside Bergholz, a village of about 700 residents where he established his community in 1995. "They won't leave us be."

Authorities in Jefferson County on Saturday arrested two of Mullet's sons, 38-year-old Johnny Mullet and 26-year-old Lester Mullet, and another man from the community, 53-year-old Levi Miller, on burglary and kidnapping warrants out of nearby Holmes County, home to the world's largest Amish community.

The three men had a hearing Tuesday and were being moved to Holmes County from the jail in Steubenville, about two hours away.

In one attack, men are accused of entering a home Oct. 3 and telling 74-year-old Raymond Hershberger, a bishop in a Holmes County Amish community, they were there to talk about religious matters, Holmes County Sheriff Timothy Zimmerly said Tuesday.

After a few minutes of small talk about the weather, the men suddenly announced, "We're here for Sam Mullet to get revenge," Zimmerly said.

Hershberger and his son were held down while the men used scissors and a battery-powered clipper to cut their beards, the sheriff said.

The men, who had hired a driver, common among the Amish, were then taken to Carroll County, where a similar attack happened, Zimmerly said. The driver, who apparently was unaware of what was happening, has not been charged.

Authorities have said two more arrests are expected this week.

Ohio has an estimated Amish population of just under 61,000 second only to Pennsylvania with most living in rural counties south and east of Cleveland.

The Amish, known for their simple, modest lifestyle, are a deeply religious group. Their simple clothing and tradition of traveling by horse and buggy distance themselves from the outside world and symbolize a yielding to a collective order.

"This kind of Amish-on-Amish violence is extremely rare," said David McConnell, an anthropology professor at Wooster College in Amish country and author of "An Amish Paradox."

The Holmes County sheriff said the community is known as peace-loving, but in this case the Amish leaders felt the only way to stop the attacks was to pursue charges.

A group of Amish bishops has previously criticized Mullet for his shunning of members of his community a few years ago.

"It was clear that he was on the outs with the majority often, for a number of reasons, but the sense I got was that he was too strict in their view," said Bryan Felmet, a lawyer who represented Mullet in the past as he took his daughter's side in a custody dispute with her husband and their children.

Mullet has been described by other Amish as very authoritarian, said Stephen Scott, researcher with Elizabethtown College's Young Center.

Some members of the community have broken with Mullet, including some of his own children, Felmet said. Mullet has at least 17 children, he said.

Mullet has a contentious history with local law enforcement: He sued Jefferson County Sheriff Fred Abdalla in 2008 in federal court over the county's seizure of two of Mullet's granddaughters from their mother in the custody dispute the year before. The two settled out of court.

The sheriff's use of armed SWAT officers "induced fear and panic" among Amish schoolchildren present at the school where the children were taken, the lawsuit said.

Abdalla said he's convinced Mullet is behind the beard and hair cutting. But the three men charged refused to confirm that, Abdalla said.

Mullet said he should be allowed to punish people who break the laws of the church, just as police are allowed to punish people who break the laws of the state.

"You have your laws on the road and the town if somebody doesn't obey them, you punish them. But I'm not allowed to punish the church people?" Mullet said. "I just let them run over me? If every family would just do as they pleased, what kind of church would we have?"

In 2008, one of Mullet's sons, Crist Mullet, was convicted of three counts of unlawful sexual conduct with a minor and sentenced to six months in jail, according to court records. Sam Mullet says his had son confessed his sins, stopped the behavior and shouldn't have been charged.

Another son, Eli Mullet, pleaded guilty the same year to threatening Sheriff Abdalla and was sentenced to probation.

Amish interaction with the criminal justice system is rare but not unprecedented.

Earlier this year, an Amish man who last year pleaded guilty to sex crimes in Missouri pleaded no contest to similar charges in Wisconsin. And young Amish occasionally end up in courts for antics during rumspringa, a period of adolescence when they're given free rein before they must choose baptism or leave the community.

Gardisten
Wednesday, October 12th, 2011, 05:03 AM
I would think that many of the people who have been drawn to this forum have some sort of longing to live the way of our ancestors and are opposed to the modern notion of "progress". The way of the modern world after all is what has been slowly destroying Germanic cultures. So whether you agree with the religious beliefs of the Amish, they have managed to preserve their form of Germanic culture relatively successfully. We should appreciate and support them for accomplishing this.


The Amish are some of the most backwards people I have ever met. They defy the course of time and resist change and progress, fear is their god. From what I read in this article, the attacks were the product of zealots, breakaways that are resisting the advances occurring in larger sects. They are learning that a greater force exists, who's power is not arbitrary and who's law is not based on mere opinions.

Lew Skannon
Wednesday, October 12th, 2011, 02:30 PM
I would think that many of the people who have been drawn to this forum have some sort of longing to live the way of our ancestors and are opposed to the modern notion of "progress". The way of the modern world after all is what has been slowly destroying Germanic cultures. So whether you agree with the religious beliefs of the Amish, they have managed to preserve their form of Germanic culture relatively successfully. We should appreciate and support them for accomplishing this.

I would go so far as to classify the Amish as an autonomous people or at least a tribe, like the Boer in South Africa. They are germanic, but have through time developed their own culture, customs, language, religion and history.

But of course that depends on wich criteria one applies to define a people.

Vindefense
Thursday, October 13th, 2011, 01:35 AM
Is self imposed reliance on renewable energy backwards?

It is not that, it is the restrictions they place upon themselves that make them backward and untenable. Yet don't be fooled, the Amish are just as dependent on modern technology as anyone else (the combustion engine) but unlike me and you they are limited to their alternatives. I am not, I can use technology as a tool, I can choose freely between electric or gasoline, solar, wind or muscle, I am not limited.


Is a strong commitment to maintaining your culture and beliefs backwards?

It is if it is comes by way of indoctrination or dogma of if knowledge must be suppressed and a state of ignorance promoted over one of understanding.


Is separating your community from the influence of todays multicultural society backwards thinking?

Yes, healthy cultures and communities do not need to rely upon separation and isolation to keep themselves whole, they do not fear differences.




I would think that many of the people who have been drawn to this forum have some sort of longing to live the way of our ancestors and are opposed to the modern notion of "progress".

I suppose they harbor romantic conceptions about the past being better than the present and I don't know how others perceive these ancestors, as for me I see men and women who fearlessly broke the chains of dogmatic religion and divine rule. Their way was ahead to improvement not backward.


The way of the modern world after all is what has been slowly destroying Germanic cultures.

People destroy themselves by resisting the change imposed upon them by nature, it is a mistake to be too rigid and it is a general fact that those species that do not adapt face extinction.


So whether you agree with the religious beliefs of the Amish, they have managed to preserve their form of Germanic culture relatively successfully. We should appreciate and support them for accomplishing this.


I do not really see any evidence of high culture among the Amish. Sorry, but their homes are bland, they frown upon ornament and artistic expression through music. The Amish are an example of what happens to a people when they choose existence over living.