PDA

View Full Version : Freyja’s Cats: Perspectives on Recent Viking Age Finds in Žegjandadalur North Iceland



celticviking
Wednesday, August 17th, 2011, 07:08 PM
Abstract: In Iceland, cats are not a common find in any archaeological contexts. Therefore, when a partial cat skeleton was found with human skull fragments in a pit in the midst of the Norse Pagan grave field of Ingirķšarstašir, Iceland, during Summer 2010, curiosities were ignited. This find may hold tantalizing clues to the importance of the cat in the Norse worldview. Cats were more significant in the Norse world than generally assumed, for they are found in art, myths, burials, magic, and in some cases sacrificial activity. With evidence from the Oseberg ship burial, other sites and historical accounts, the Ingirķšarstašir cat potentially holds clues to an elite fertility cult of Freyja in Iceland.



http://www.odinistpressservice.com/

Hersir
Wednesday, August 17th, 2011, 08:57 PM
The longhaired Norwegian forest cat is one of the oldest breeds in the world!:)

Ocko
Wednesday, August 17th, 2011, 09:17 PM
The swedes mostly honored Freya. I assume you find cat related things over there.

Iceland seem to have been an Odin land, so Freya and her cats might have played there a lesser role.

Freya is earth-shamanism, working with the feminine, creation, love, relationsships etc.

Odin is war-shamanism like shapeshifting, sacred/magic weapons. he has a warrior horse, journeying to foreign lands and so on.

Even today it is more the women who keep cats. (I do not say men don't but statistically I assume they tend more to women).

Hersir
Thursday, August 18th, 2011, 05:54 AM
http://www.odinistpressservice.com/ (http://forums.skadi.net/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.odin istpressservice.com%2F)


The swedes mostly honored Freya. I assume you find cat related things over there.

Iceland seem to have been an Odin land, so Freya and her cats might have played there a lesser role.

Freya is earth-shamanism, working with the feminine, creation, love, relationsships etc.

Odin is war-shamanism like shapeshifting, sacred/magic weapons. he has a warrior horse, journeying to foreign lands and so on.

Even today it is more the women who keep cats. (I do not say men don't but statistically I assume they tend more to women).

From what I've read Iceland was Tor land. People fled from the oppression of the ruling class, and Odin was a god for nobility. Thor was the most popular god with common people. The sagas show that Odin is clearly egoistic.

All of Frųya's cats were male.

Ocko
Thursday, August 18th, 2011, 06:59 PM
The question about the settling of Iceland is a bit off topic but there is a theory that during the killings by Charlemagne a lot of noble saxon went up north to instigate the fights of the vikings against christian places. when christianity encroached on to Skandinavia the descendants of those saxon moved over to Iceland. Hence you find over there typical german sagas about Siegfried/Sigurd and others.

Freya was mostly connected to farming, lesser to animal husbandry.

I am not sure on what early Icelanders survived, whether they have been more farmers or 'herders'. My guess is that they chose Thor (or Odin as the Edda is to a great part about Odin) rather than Freya for their 'usefulness'.

Ancient saxons have been mostly Thor's people too.

The three classes of the Asa are shaman/priest/king/law-speaker, the second class are the warriors, Thor, Heimdallr etc, and the third-class the producers, creators of wealth etc., Freya (Earth), Frey and Njoerd (water)

Though Thor is also connected to the weather (Thunderstorm=Thor's storm), that might have been a minor thing for him. The farmers in olden Germany even kept a corner of their field for Odin's horse, so it could feed on it, the grain was not harvested.

So Odin, Thor and Freya belonged each to a different class but there seems to be shared functionalities with specialties.

Schopenhauer
Friday, August 19th, 2011, 04:06 AM
The sagas show that Odin is clearly egoistic

Odin is the god of magic and inspiration. He is not the god of the common people.

Hersir
Friday, August 19th, 2011, 08:39 AM
Odin is the god of magic and inspiration. He is not the god of the common people.

He's the god of more than that. He is a war god and death god.
In the saga's we have stories about him turning the battle so that the best vikings die, because he needs them as einherjers.

Goomer
Friday, August 19th, 2011, 08:48 AM
The swedes mostly honored Freya. I assume you find cat related things over there.

Iceland seem to have been an Odin land, so Freya and her cats might have played there a lesser role.

Freya is earth-shamanism, working with the feminine, creation, love, relationsships etc.

Odin is war-shamanism like shapeshifting, sacred/magic weapons. he has a warrior horse, journeying to foreign lands and so on.

Even today it is more the women who keep cats. (I do not say men don't but statistically I assume they tend more to women).

My observations as well.

Hersir
Friday, August 19th, 2011, 02:39 PM
It's not correct. Many families fled to Iceland to escape Norwegian kings and chieftains, and Odin was a god of aristocracy.

Schopenhauer
Friday, August 19th, 2011, 03:09 PM
He's the god of more than that. He is a war god and death god.
In the saga's we have stories about him turning the battle so that the best vikings die, because he needs them as einherjers.

Literal interpretations of the Eddas only lead to a small and often inaccurate understanding.

Odin, like the Runes he sacrificed himself to himself for knowledge of, is a continuously unfolding mystery.

Ragnar Lodbrok
Sunday, August 21st, 2011, 11:41 PM
Odin is the god of magic and inspiration. He is not the god of the common people.

Nobody could be a disciple of Odin who was destined to be a slave. Including those who become slaves to their own ego's.

Schopenhauer
Monday, August 22nd, 2011, 01:37 AM
Nobody could be a disciple of Odin who was destined to be a slave. Including those who become slaves to their own ego's.

Odin is not a god with "mass appeal." He is the god of sorcery and self-deification. The Eddas are very clear on this point.

Ocko
Monday, August 22nd, 2011, 02:13 AM
The list of mammals in Iceland is pretty limited (mostly whales etc). The only rodent which could have been prey for cats is the wood mouse. About the extent and number of that little creature I do not know much but as the name says it dwells most likely in woods and grasslands.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/bd/Apodemus_sylvaticus_bosmuis.jpg
It seems the Icelanders did not really need cats, which means they were kept as pets or for religious reasons, but both seemed to have been rare.

Schopenhauer
Monday, August 22nd, 2011, 02:31 AM
The list of mammals in Iceland is pretty limited (mostly whales etc). The only rodent which could have been prey for cats is the wood mouse. About the extent and number of that little creature I do not know much but as the name says it dwells most likely in woods and grasslands.

It seems the Icelanders did not really need cats, which means they were kept as pets or for religious reasons, but both seemed to have been rare.

Or maybe, like us, they just enjoyed their wonderful furry company.