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View Full Version : Blaukraut ( Spiced Red Cabbage )



SpearBrave
Monday, August 8th, 2011, 12:42 AM
Blaukraut

Since there was interest in the other cooking/canning threads I decided to make another one.:)

Blaukraut is a spiced red cabbage side dish served with almost any meat, I like it with pork roast, beef on top of spaetzle, and my favorite is with Roulades, anyway here is the recipe.

Start with some nice red cabbage.
( pay attention to the upper right hand corner of the picture, I have a onlooker :D)
http://i906.photobucket.com/albums/ac267/sidthekid999/bluakraut004.jpg

One head of red cabbage and one tart apple. I prefer Granny Smith apples.
http://i906.photobucket.com/albums/ac267/sidthekid999/bluakraut001.jpg

Cut the Cabbage in quarters and remove the core.
http://i906.photobucket.com/albums/ac267/sidthekid999/bluakraut002.jpg

Shred the cabbage and add 1 1/2 cups water and 1 1/2 cups cider vinegar and 1 cup of sugar. Keep in mind cabbage 'cooks' down to about 25% of it being raw.
http://i906.photobucket.com/albums/ac267/sidthekid999/bluakraut006.jpg

While cabbage begins to cook down prepare a spice bag with whole cloves, whole Allspice and whatever else you like. She adds different things at different times just make sure to add the cloves and allspice.
http://i906.photobucket.com/albums/ac267/sidthekid999/bluakraut007.jpg

Next peel the apple and slice it very thin and add it to the cooking down cabbage.
http://i906.photobucket.com/albums/ac267/sidthekid999/bluakraut009.jpg

Now that the cabbage is cooked hot pack it in jars. Look up how to hot water bath can. At this stage you can eat it if you want or can it for the winter.
http://i906.photobucket.com/albums/ac267/sidthekid999/bluakraut010.jpg

Place the hot packed jars in a boiling water bath canner make sure the jars are covered by water. Boil for 15 mins for pints and 20 mins. for quarts.
http://i906.photobucket.com/albums/ac267/sidthekid999/bluakraut011.jpg

Here it is ready to be stored in the cellar for this winter...
http://i906.photobucket.com/albums/ac267/sidthekid999/blaukraut20001.jpg

or ready and waiting for nice piece of roast pork or other meat.
http://i906.photobucket.com/albums/ac267/sidthekid999/bluakraut012.jpg

I hope you enjoyed this and thank you for viewing, if you have any questions or comments please feel free to post them.

(note: we are cooking much more than one head of cabbage so the pictures are off ;)).

Hesse
Monday, August 8th, 2011, 01:24 AM
Looks like a nice vegetable dish. I've tried other recipies for rotkraut and it's good. Especially with a prepared German main dish. :thumbup

I really wish I would have taken a shot at growing it in the garden.
Guess I'll just have to buy it at the market.... Will try it to grow it next year hopefully.



While cabbage begins to cook down prepare a spice with whole cloves, whole Allspice and whatever else you like. She adds different things at different times just make sure to add the cloves and allspice.
http://i906.photobucket.com/albums/ac267/sidthekid999/bluakraut007.jpg


So allspice and cloves, I see you got some cinnammon in the prepared spice blend and what else? What are those green leaves?

I'm not brave enough to go ahead and can food, (they don't call you SpearBrave for nothing :P) , so is this recipe good eaten off the stove and without tinning or canning?


Blaukraut is a spiced red cabbage side dish served with almost any meat, I like it with pork roast, beef on top of spaetzle, and my favorite is with Roulades, anyway here is the recipe.

One last, shouldn't it be called "Rotkraut" since it's red and not Blaukraut? I mean, why is red cabbage called blue cabbage (Blaukraut)? I really have no idea why they decided to call it blue cabbage when it's actually red.


Start with some nice red cabbage.
( pay attention to the upper right hand picture, I have a onlooker :D)
http://i906.photobucket.com/albums/ac267/sidthekid999/bluakraut004.jpg


I'm finally seeing it. I took me awhile. :P

SpearBrave
Monday, August 8th, 2011, 01:33 AM
The Redhead puts other spices in than what she tells me. She is not very good at sharing cooking secrets.She only said those two spices were the most important. I think juniper berries might be one of the other ones, since she had me collecting them for her a few days ago.;)

My family calls it blaukraut, it might just be dialect issue. I have heard other call it "Rotkraut". Although it is more of purple before it is cooked.

Hesse
Monday, August 8th, 2011, 02:03 AM
The Redhead puts other spices in than what she tells me. She is not very good at sharing cooking secrets.She only said those two spices were the most important. I think juniper berries might be one of the other ones, since she had me collecting them for her a few days ago.;)


I'm guessing that the green leaves are bayleafs.


My family calls it blaukraut, it might just be dialect issue. I have heard other call it "Rotkraut". Although it is more of purple before it is cooked.

Rotkraut makes better sense IMO.

But to most English speakers, it sounds like "Road kraut" when pronounced. In other words less than appetizing to the palate. :P

SpearBrave
Monday, August 8th, 2011, 02:11 AM
Hehe when speaking around the house I would say Rotkraut Rot-Kohl kinda like root kool if spelled phonetically. I can speak good proper English when I try, I just don't try too often.

Gardisten
Monday, August 8th, 2011, 02:16 AM
According to wikipedia, these are the general geographic ranges of the various names:

* Rotkohl: Norddeutschland (Schleswig-Holstein, Niedersachsen, nördliches Sachsen-Anhalt, Berlin, Brandenburg, Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Nordrhein-Westfalen), Schweiz
* Rotkraut: Mittel- und Südwestdeutschland (Sachsen, Thüringen, Hessen, Baden, Pfalz), Ostösterreich (Niederösterreich, Wien, Burgenland, Oststeiermark), Schweiz
* Blaukraut: Süddeutschland (Württemberg, Franken, Bayern), Österreich (oben nicht genannte Länder), Schweiz
* (Rot-/Blau-)Kappes: Nordrhein-Westfalen, Rheinland

Apparently the colour of the cabbage depends to a certain extent on the type of soil, alkaline soils causing the colour to appear more "blue".

Hesse
Monday, August 8th, 2011, 06:01 PM
Apparently the colour of the cabbage depends to a certain extent on the type of soil, alkaline soils causing the colour to appear more "blue".


One would infer that apparently the soil in Bavaria and the German south must be more alkaline than northerly parts of the country .



According to wikipedia, these are the general geographic ranges of the various names:

* Rotkohl: Norddeutschland (Schleswig-Holstein, Niedersachsen, nördliches Sachsen-Anhalt, Berlin, Brandenburg, Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Nordrhein-Westfalen), Schweiz
* Rotkraut: Mittel- und Südwestdeutschland (Sachsen, Thüringen, Hessen, Baden, Pfalz), Ostösterreich (Niederösterreich, Wien, Burgenland, Oststeiermark), Schweiz
* Blaukraut: Süddeutschland (Württemberg, Franken, Bayern), Österreich (oben nicht genannte Länder), Schweiz
* (Rot-/Blau-)Kappes: Nordrhein-Westfalen, Rheinland


Rotkraut remains Rotkraut in the North, ja?


Aber im suden wissen wir immer, Sie wissen was Sie sagen:

Blaukraut bleibt Blaukraut und Brautkleid bleibt Brautkleid

Now say that one as fast as you can ;).

TXRog
Monday, August 8th, 2011, 06:22 PM
My German grandmother (rest her soul) used to make all kinds of variations on red cabbage.

I LOVE this stuff!!:D

Thanks for sharing the recipe, wallflower. :thumbup

Hesse
Monday, August 8th, 2011, 06:30 PM
Thanks for sharing the recipe, wallflower. :thumbup

It wasn't me, but it was SpearBrave who introduced us to this recipe and shared with us how he prepared it. He's the primary first and foremost source of this fine Germanic dish ;)

TXRog
Monday, August 8th, 2011, 06:34 PM
It wasn't me, but it was SpearBrave who introduced us to this recipe and shared with us how he prepared it. ;)

My sincere apologies to my brother SpearBrave for this gross oversight. Must be more attentive to details of "topic posters" here on SF.

Still love red cabbage!!:D

Naglfari
Monday, August 8th, 2011, 11:18 PM
Thanks for the recipe SpearBrave. I do make my own sauerkraut but it is just the standard kind now I have something different.


I'm not brave enough to go ahead and can food, (they don't call you SpearBrave for nothing :P) , so is this recipe good eaten off the stove and without tinning or canning?

Don't be afraid of canning. Canning is your friend. :)

This dish uses vinegar which is anti-bacterial and anti-fungal so would be a good first project in canning. If you're still worried you can just keep them in the fridge after canning.

http://www.freshpreserving.com/guides/IntroToCanning.pdf