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AuroraNordalis
Monday, July 11th, 2011, 06:32 PM
I have Scotts Irish Ancestry and I was reading about the Ulster Scotts.
My ancestors surname was Hicks. I read Hicks has it's origins amongst Anglo Saxons in England.

So I am trying to figure out if I am actually English or Scottish.
I read most Ulster Scotts are not even ethnic Irish. So anyone know about the
likely hood of my ancestry?

This has been kind of bothering me for a while.

Thanks.

Hersir
Monday, July 11th, 2011, 07:24 PM
Ulster people are of norse ancestry, it was common for my ancestors to take Irish women, but I dont know if this was the case there.

Eliite
Monday, July 11th, 2011, 07:45 PM
Ulster Scots or Scots Irish are of Lowland Scottish and English origin, so the English name wouldn't be a surprise.

GeistFaust
Monday, July 11th, 2011, 07:57 PM
The Ulster Scots come from a variety of areas some of them are lowland Scots some are from the midland area or the are of the Hebrides Islands. Alot of them did marry with Irish women when they came over or with English lowlanders. There were some considerable Norse influences in the area though so alot of Ulster Scots have Norwegian and Danish ancestry.

The Horned God
Monday, July 11th, 2011, 08:02 PM
Your Ulster-Scots side is probably mixed English and Lowland Scots with a lesser amount of Highland Scots ancestry as well.

Hersir
Monday, July 11th, 2011, 08:45 PM
http://www.loughcuan.com/Pages/history-vikings.htm

Eliite
Monday, July 11th, 2011, 08:58 PM
http://www.loughcuan.com/Pages/history-vikings.htm

There were Vikings all over Ireland, what does this have to do anything? particularly the Ulster Scots who were from later Protestant Scottish and English ancestry?

Naglfari
Monday, July 11th, 2011, 09:04 PM
You should also look into the Border Reiver culture. If you want to read up on it, which you really should, the best book is The Scotch Irish: A Social History by James Leyburn.

For the Europeans Scotch-Irish is what we call Ulster Scots.

Eliite
Monday, July 11th, 2011, 09:06 PM
For the Europeans Scotch-Irish is what we call Ulster Scots.

Nobody in the UK uses the term Scotch-Irish, that is a highly American phrase, Scots-Irish is used alright, along with (and mainly) Uslter Scots.

Naglfari
Monday, July 11th, 2011, 09:09 PM
Nobody in the UK uses the term Scotch-Irish, that is a highly American phrase, Scots-Irish is used alright, along with (and mainly) Uslter Scots.

I am an American. :)

Gall Óglach
Monday, July 11th, 2011, 09:14 PM
English settlers tended to be members of the church of Ireland (Anglicans) and Scottish settlers tended to be presbyterians.

There were also quite a few French Huguenots that settled in Linen weaving areas.

Its hard to guage intermarriage between different denominations and the levels of conversion.

Anglicans tended to be the most affluent, I reckon most emmigrants to America would be presbytarians, which may explain the religiousity of the US south.

Hersir
Monday, July 11th, 2011, 09:16 PM
There were Vikings all over Ireland, what does this have to do anything? particularly the Ulster Scots who were from later Protestant Scottish and English ancestry?

Because they settled there, and therefore Ulster people will have partially norse ancestry, no?

Naglfari
Monday, July 11th, 2011, 09:28 PM
English settlers tended to be members of the church of Ireland (Anglicans) and Scottish settlers tended to be presbyterians.

There were also quite a few French Huguenots that settled in Linen weaving areas.

Its hard to guage intermarriage between different denominations and the levels of conversion.

Anglicans tended to be the most affluent, I reckon most emmigrants to America would be presbytarians, which may explain the religiousity of the US south.

Yes it was largely the Presbyterians as they also had laws restricting their religious practices like not having marriages recognized if done by Presbyterian ministers.

When they came to the colonies they streamed in to Philadelphia and went west until they hit the Appalachians and turned south.

GeistFaust
Monday, July 11th, 2011, 09:30 PM
I have some Ulster Scot ancestry in my family they refer to themselves as Scotch Irish or even just as plain Irish at times.

AuroraNordalis
Monday, July 11th, 2011, 10:14 PM
Wow thanks :thumbsup

I did not expect so many answers so fast you people rock. So more than likely than not, I have some English ancestry. Looks like I will have to add another flag to my collection in honor of my heritage.

Angus
Monday, July 11th, 2011, 10:22 PM
I have some Ulster Scot ancestry in my family they refer to themselves as Scotch Irish or even just as plain Irish at times.

Well be sure to tell them they're wrong. We aren't an alcoholic drink.

Eppillus
Monday, July 18th, 2011, 11:48 PM
Scotch Irish is an American term, Ulster Scot is much better, and much more likely to be used by an Ulster Scot. I too, have Ulster Scot ancestry