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Johannes de León
Sunday, July 11th, 2004, 07:35 PM
Please vote. :)

Shaun
Sunday, July 11th, 2004, 07:58 PM
I live in an almost rural (although it's considered suburban) area close to a metropolitan core. I would love to live in a metropolitan mean. I love the fast pace, upcoming technology, many people, and more resources available.

nemo
Monday, July 19th, 2004, 11:15 PM
I live in new york city, it has it's good points and bad points, but I like being around people, being born here you get to know the do's and don'ts, you get to know which areas are safe and which are no..no's.

But it is an exciting city and you can buy most anything here, and their are plenty of woman to pick from :D

New York , New York! it's a wonderful town :)

Strengthandhonour
Monday, July 19th, 2004, 11:54 PM
My ideal place to live, is a small town in the mountains near a big city, with lots of trees, very quiet and calm and relaxing, surrounded by big mountains.

Johannes de León
Tuesday, July 20th, 2004, 01:52 AM
My ideal place to live, is a small town in the mountains near a big city, with lots of trees, very quiet and calm and relaxing, surrounded by big mountains. So you want something like this?? :D

Switzerland - Lake Gruyre

Strengthandhonour
Tuesday, July 20th, 2004, 01:57 AM
So you want something like this?? :D

Switzerland - Lake Gruyre
-packs up his bags and gets his airplane ticket to Switzerland- :D

Awar
Tuesday, July 20th, 2004, 02:23 AM
I'd love to live in Montenegro where a mix of both is possible.
In some relatively small mediterranean town.

It's great, the distances between towns and cities is small. You can spend your days
on the clear adriatic seas, enjoying the sun and then spend your nights in the mountains, where it's cold and the air is clear.

Telperion
Tuesday, July 20th, 2004, 03:02 AM
You can spend your days
on the clear adriatic seas, enjoying the sun and then spend your nights in the mountains, where it's cold and the air is clear.
It sounds rather like southern California (without the urban sprawl, traffic congestion, air pollution, rampant crime and invading hordes of barbarians).

Alkman
Tuesday, July 20th, 2004, 03:12 AM
I live in my ideal place. Athens

Awar
Tuesday, July 20th, 2004, 03:25 AM
Yep, Greece is lovely.

Aristotle
Tuesday, July 20th, 2004, 11:45 AM
EYTYXEITE!

Dear Alkman, be serious! We are living in modern 'Athens'... don't forget it when you mention the term 'ideal'...
Kindest Regards!

Έστωσαν οι Θεοί αρωγοί Υμών!

I live in my ideal place. Athens

Marius
Tuesday, July 20th, 2004, 11:54 AM
It depends on your activity. Each mean has its advantages: if you're into scientifical research, your lab is surely in a metropolitan area, so it would be nicer not to spend too much time for going to work, since you are often there.

The rural envirnoment has also its advantages, the calm, the tranquility, the good air, but you will be forced to pass the big road blocks in the morning in order to get to your work. Of course, if you have a profession which does not request the presence into a metropolitan area, it's ok.

Alkman
Tuesday, July 20th, 2004, 01:47 PM
EYTYXEITE!

Dear Alkman, be serious! We are living in modern 'Athens'... don't forget it when you mention the term 'ideal'...
Kindest Regards!

Έστωσαν οι Θεοί αρωγοί Υμών!You have a point ,if you refer to how modern Athens was structured.But it rains less than 10 days per year,sun is shining the rest of it,your eyes can rest wathcing the sea (i live in Pireus ;) )
The rest can be fixed

Evolved
Tuesday, July 20th, 2004, 02:24 PM
My ideal setting would be in the wilderness, surrounded by pine trees and as far away from 'civilization' as possible. I'd like to live in a yurt or log cabin. I'd like to have a vegetable garden and hunt/fish for my own food, cook it on an open fire, sew my own clothes, a few horses as my transportation. Rejecting the modern world and teaching myself basic ancient human skills. Back-to-barbarian-roots survivalism. Perhaps in a small community or clan of like-minded people. Pretty crazy, huh? :)

But in real life it is either Northern Michigan (http://forums.skadi.net/showthread.php?t=14503) or rural Southern Hungary (http://forums.skadi.net/showpost.php?p=101112&postcount=3) for me. :)

Marius
Tuesday, July 20th, 2004, 03:06 PM
He...he... Békéscsaba is near Arad and near Romania. You should also spend some time in Romania and you will perhaps have other views. :)

nemo
Tuesday, July 20th, 2004, 03:50 PM
My ideal setting would be in the wilderness, surrounded by pine trees and as far away from 'civilization' as possible. I'd like to live in a yurt or log cabin. I'd like to have a vegetable garden and hunt/fish for my own food, cook it on an open fire, sew my own clothes, a few horses as my transportation. Rejecting the modern world and teaching myself basic ancient human skills. Back-to-barbarian-roots survivalism. Perhaps in a small community or clan of like-minded people. Pretty crazy, huh? :)

But in real life it is either Northern Michigan (http://forums.skadi.net/showthread.php?t=14503) or rural Southern Hungary (http://forums.skadi.net/showpost.php?p=101112&postcount=3) for me. :)

It's good to have a dream! but you have to know where to seperate the dream from reality, if you live in your dream to much it can cause you problems in the real world, it begins to distort your thinking, and cause problems for you in your real life.

Nordgau
Tuesday, July 20th, 2004, 05:59 PM
Kurt Tucholsky characterized the ideal place to live as: vorne Kufürstendamm, hinten Ostsee.

Brought into an American context: At the frontdoor the Fifth Avenue, at the backdoor Yellowstone National Park.

Allenson
Tuesday, July 20th, 2004, 06:45 PM
My ideal setting would be in the wilderness, surrounded by pine trees and as far away from 'civilization' as possible. I'd like to live in a yurt or log cabin. I'd like to have a vegetable garden and hunt/fish for my own food, cook it on an open fire, sew my own clothes, a few horses as my transportation. Rejecting the modern world and teaching myself basic ancient human skills. Back-to-barbarian-roots survivalism. Perhaps in a small community or clan of like-minded people. Pretty crazy, huh? :)


Not at all LG--don't listen to nemo--he's just trying to burst your bubble. Locked in the vile pit that is NYC, I'm not surprised at his remarks...


Anyway--rural fellow all the way here. I wouldn't "trade it for the world"... ;)

Here's a picture of the 'downtown' near me. I live about 2 miles above this village in the hills...

http://www.naturereflection.com/images/Landscapes/Scenic/SL207Lg.jpg

nemo
Tuesday, July 20th, 2004, 07:00 PM
Not at all LG--don't listen to nemo--he's just trying to burst your bubble. Locked in the vile pit that is NYC, I'm not surprised at his remarks...


Anyway--rural fellow all the way here. I wouldn't "trade it for the world"... ;)

Here's a picture of the 'downtown' near me. I live about 2 miles above this village in the hills...

http://www.naturereflection.com/images/Landscapes/Scenic/SL207Lg.jpg

New York is only a vile pit to the weak hearted, their are many good places in NYC, and you can do more in NYC in one day then you could do in a life time up in the hills with the birds and bees :)

BTW! remember all bubbles have to eventually burst! and when they do you wind up all wet.

Remember! people who live to much in a dream, it is because they cannot cope with reality, and dreaming is an escape from the present.

My post to Lg was not intended to put her down, but only an opinion on what she said.
It appeared to me that she wanted to know what others thought of her dream.

Phlegethon
Tuesday, July 20th, 2004, 08:19 PM
I'd want to live in a place where I could find a halfway decent job. Apparently this rules out both rural and metropolitan for me. So I guess I'd want to live where I could live on welfare.

Aristotle
Tuesday, July 20th, 2004, 10:31 PM
EYTYXEITE!

Dear Alkman,living in Pireus, you are very lucky, indeed!
Kindest Regards!

Έστωσαν οι Θεοί αρωγοί Υμών!
You have a point ,if you refer to how modern Athens was structured.But it rains less than 10 days per year,sun is shining the rest of it,your eyes can rest wathcing the sea (i live in Pireus ;) )
The rest can be fixed

George
Wednesday, July 21st, 2004, 12:31 AM
I live in the countryside in the hills. I'd like to live in Alaska - I like cold weather, high latitudes, rugged terrain, sparse population and wilderness. :) The north coast of Scotland is great too though; I'm attached to Britain's, old, dingy, despondent style.

nemo
Wednesday, July 21st, 2004, 01:10 AM
It appears to me, that many of you people here are very introverted :shrug

George
Wednesday, July 21st, 2004, 01:48 AM
All of the normal people are susceptible to brainwashing. Only the freaks are left ha ha ha. :D Or the elite if you want to look at it that way.

I feel like one of the last humans, on 'Invasion of the Bodysnatchers', surrounded by things the shape of people, which seem on the surface to be normal, talk normally, act normally, but there's just something not quite right about them which one can't put one's finger on - and then one can understand that they aren't human actually any more than a doll is human, they're just pretending. They're like a computer program and when I look into their face I see a blank screen with nothing behind it.

So it is natural for me and people like me, which I think most people here are although I may be an extreme case, to be alienated from the herd. One can have a conversation with normal people as one can have a conversation with a small child if one is in the mood, but it grows tiresome after a short while.

nemo
Wednesday, July 21st, 2004, 02:07 AM
All of the normal people are susceptible to brainwashing. Only the freaks are left ha ha ha. :D Or the elite if you want to look at it that way.

I feel like one of the last humans, on 'Invasion of the Bodysnatchers', surrounded by things the shape of people, which seem on the surface to be normal, talk normally, act normally, but there's just something not quite right about them which one can't put one's finger on - and then one can understand that they aren't human actually any more than a doll is human, they're just pretending. They're like a computer program and when I look into their face I see a blank screen with nothing behind it.

So it is natural for me and people like me, which I think most people here are although I may be an extreme case, to be alienated from the herd. One can have a conversation with normal people as one can have a conversation with a small child if one is in the mood, but it grows tiresome after a short while.


I would say that maybe 50% of the people you mention that I meet are that way, but the others could be very interesting.

When picking friends it is like picking out apples, the rotton ones you don't take, just the good apples you keep.

Ewergrin
Wednesday, July 21st, 2004, 02:38 AM
I would say that maybe 50% of the people you mention that I meet are that way, but the others could be very interesting.

When picking friends it is like picking out apples, the rotton ones you don't take, just the good apples you keep.


When life gives you lemons, make lemonade... or hurl them at someone selling lemonade.

Allenson
Wednesday, July 21st, 2004, 06:49 PM
New York is only a vile pit to the weak hearted, their are many good places in NYC, and you can do more in NYC in one day then you could do in a life time up in the hills with the birds and bees :)



Sure Nemo, sure. There is more to do and see in NYC than in the countryside only for those blinded by urbanism and immune to subtlties of the country year.

I'll glady take birds and bees over filth and soot. :-O

Do me a favor, please--tell your NYC ilk that Vermont totally sucks and that they should stop moving here! :D (:o

Johannes de León
Wednesday, July 21st, 2004, 06:53 PM
Sure Nemo, sure. There is more to do and see in NYC than in the countryside only for those blinded by urbanism and immune to subtlties of the country year.

I'll glady take birds and bees over filth and soot. :-O
The same goes for me... I have some kind of cityphobia. :D

nemo
Wednesday, July 21st, 2004, 07:30 PM
Sure Nemo, sure. There is more to do and see in NYC than in the countryside only for those blinded by urbanism and immune to subtlties of the country year.

I'll glady take birds and bees over filth and soot. :-O

Do me a favor, please--tell your NYC ilk that Vermont totally sucks and that they should stop moving here! :D (:o

well actually Vermont is a beautiful state, and a very pleasant place to go on vacation.
But being born in a large city like NYC, as much as attractive Vermont is, I don't beleive I could live their all year round, because I am accustomed to a city life, and might find living in Vermont becoming a little boring for me.

You were born their so you are accustomed to it.

You know the old saying!" some people like apple pie, and some people like lemmon pie", in other words to each his own
;)

One mans medicine, is another mans poison ! who the hell said that? :D

Gesta Bellica
Wednesday, July 21st, 2004, 07:55 PM
that's my hometown, the picture sucks but just to give ya an hint about where do i live..
i like it, it's not far from Milan then i can have the best of both worlds ;)

Strengthandhonour
Wednesday, July 21st, 2004, 09:19 PM
See, that's what I like. Live in a small and quiet place(very peaceful) but have a nice big city near you for those times when you are bored.

Saoirse
Wednesday, July 21st, 2004, 09:50 PM
In the mountains of Ireland is where I'll be moving to.

Allenson
Wednesday, July 21st, 2004, 11:22 PM
well actually Vermont is a beautiful state, and a very pleasant place to go on vacation.
But being born in a large city like NYC, as much as attractive Vermont is, I don't beleive I could live their all year round, because I am accustomed to a city life, and might find living in Vermont becoming a little boring for me.

You were born their so you are accustomed to it.

You know the old saying!" some people like apple pie, and some people like lemmon pie", in other words to each his own
;)

One mans medicine, is another mans poison ! who the hell said that? :D


OK--I agree that "to each his own". I just sent you some rep points. ;)

Taras Bulba
Wednesday, July 21st, 2004, 11:23 PM
Ironically I leave in between both rural and urban areas. So very often I experience both. So I dont have particular bias towards city or country. I love elements of both really. Although by urban I mean white urban areas. Minority filled urbanism is sickness.

VNN had a good article explaining this in reference to Detroit, which is the area I live around.

Pedro
Wednesday, July 21st, 2004, 11:32 PM
Since I have seen the russian-japan film Dersu Uzala of Akira Kurosawa link (http://images-jp.amazon.com/images/P/B00004Y7HL.01.LZZZZZZZ.jpg)
Is Eastsibiria my ideal place. It was 10 years ago, i have always the same ideal.

Angelcynn Beorn
Thursday, July 22nd, 2004, 12:09 AM
I was born and bred in the city and i love the choice and opportunites it gives people willing to use them. I also love the abundance of people, how you can meet new people every day and also how you can meet new girls without having to worry about veryone knowing your business or getting to nosey.

On the other hand i also love the countryside, its far more beautiful and majestic than anything mans hands can ever immitate. But its so damn quiet and remote that i dont think i could live there indefinitely.

Even with all a citys bad points (violence, dirt, crime, etc) id have to take it in preferance to the country.

I was born a city boy and i guess ill die one. :D

Taras Bulba
Thursday, July 22nd, 2004, 12:22 AM
I was born and bred in the city and i love the choice and opportunites it gives people willing to use them. I also love the abundance of people, how you can meet new people every day and also how you can meet new girls without having to worry about veryone knowing your business or getting to nosey.

On the other hand i also love the countryside, its far more beautiful and majestic than anything mans hands can ever immitate. But its so damn quiet and remote that i dont think i could live there indefinitely.

Even with all a citys bad points (violence, dirt, crime, etc) id have to take it in preferance to the country.

I was born a city boy and i guess ill die one. :D

I've always argued for a balance between urbanism and ruralism; both provide something for a true folkish culture. The urban often provided the intellectual and high cultural achievements of the folk, while the rural often preserved the noble ideals and traditional folk culture(as opposed to the high culture of the urban).

The sad thing is that the urban has become too commercialized and city planning encourages much that destroys the true potential of a city. I support the neo-traditionalist or sometimes called "New urbanism" intitiative which wishes to bring back more traditional forms of city planning that help produce a healthier and more communitarian city life. David Myatt had some good ideas about this as well.


I agree with the Third Position stance:

The Third Position believes that in a sane social order there is a vital balance to be struck between Ruralism and Urbanism. In and of itself, Ruralism is by far the healthier, for it possesses all that is essential to life, but this does not detract from the fact that a complementary urbanism - made up of hamlets, villages, market towns, centres of non-polluting technological advance, light industry and research institutes - can add much of use and benefit to human existence. This balance between Ruralism and Urbanism is held to be central to the worldview of the Third Position, for it determines, directly or indirectly, so much else of the programme of the Third Position.

nemo
Thursday, July 22nd, 2004, 02:03 PM
OK--I agree that "to each his own". I just sent you some rep points. ;)

Cool!
:cool

Northern Paladin
Sunday, July 10th, 2005, 05:14 PM
I live in the Suburbs. Though I've had the experience of all three.

Ewergrin
Sunday, July 10th, 2005, 05:23 PM
I've lived in all three. Currently I live in a somewhat rural area on the outskirts of a huge suburb, roughly 15 minutes from where I grew up, which is basically in the middle of a huge evergreen forest. :thumbup
I would never go back to living in the heart of a major city.

Todesritter
Sunday, July 10th, 2005, 05:40 PM
I live in a huge Urban area, but my home is a rural area.:~(

Some day I will go back.:)

Northern Paladin
Sunday, July 10th, 2005, 05:45 PM
If demographics is anything to go by. The future of America will tend toward polarizaion and vast regional differences in "diversity".

Even now most of the diveristy in concentrated on the East and West Coasts and the SouthWest.

Nordgau
Sunday, July 10th, 2005, 05:56 PM
I myself live in an urban area, but my parents' home, which still is my "second home", is located in a rural area (but again close to the side of a bigger town).

Fenris
Sunday, July 10th, 2005, 06:51 PM
I grew up in a combination of urban areas and army bases, my dad was in the military for a long time. We settled finally in an urban area of Manchester, England near where both my parents grew up. I'm now living in a rural area in the USA, north-western Illinois to be more precise.

Nordgau
Sunday, July 10th, 2005, 07:16 PM
Stuff:

http://www.bbr.bund.de/infosite/grafik/abb17.jpg

Translation:

Part of the population

Red: in the largest city.
Light red: in the second to sixth largest cities.
Pink: in all other cities.
Green: outside of cities.


http://www.bbr.bund.de/infosite/grafik/stadttypen.jpg

Not much space left here. :|

Northern Paladin
Sunday, July 10th, 2005, 09:00 PM
Stuff:

http://www.bbr.bund.de/infosite/grafik/abb17.jpg

Translation:

Part of the population

Red: in the largest city.
Light red: in the second to sixth largest cities.
Pink: in all other cities.
Green: outside of cities.


http://www.bbr.bund.de/infosite/grafik/stadttypen.jpg

Not much space left here. :|

Perhaps it's time Germany expands her borders. But not before doing a little internal house keeping. :D

User
Sunday, July 10th, 2005, 10:36 PM
I live in the town because I have to to make a life for myself. I spend my weekends in the countryside however. There is a surprisingly large difference between the two, that is, between the people in the two and I think that most of the final resistance of the White Race to its death will come from the rural people. They are almost 100% White still and are a much healthier lot than the townies and what with the fuel protests and the Countryside Alliance and Scottish nationalism amongst other things they are getting going.

Thusnelda
Monday, July 11th, 2005, 12:27 AM
I live in a rural area direct in a middle mountain range. My community has 5000 inhabitants, The next town is 30km away. ;) I LOVE it sooo much - the people, the silence, the nature. I´ll never move into a city! We have here all what we want. Even DSL. *g* And if I really like to go to the city, I´m in 30 min there by car.

Thusnelda
Monday, July 11th, 2005, 12:28 AM
I live in a rural area direct in a middle mountain range. My community has around 5000 inhabitants. The next town is 30 kilometres away. I LOVE my village sooo much - the people, the silence, the nature! No crime, no HipHop, no degeneration, no torment of the mind.
I´ll never move into a city! We have here all what we want...Even DSL. *g* And if I really like to go to the city, I´m in 30 min there - by car.

Dr. Solar Wolff
Monday, July 11th, 2005, 07:34 AM
I live in the mountains along with about 22 other full-time residents. About 40 miles away there is a town of about 1000 people. If we go "down" for the winter, our other residence has about 10,000 people scattered around a lake. Until about 1989 we lived in a city, a suburb of Los Angeles. I will never go back there.

Sentinel
Monday, July 11th, 2005, 09:38 AM
I'm an urban dweller. :(

Odin Biggles
Monday, July 11th, 2005, 11:16 AM
I live in the mountains along with about 22 other full-time residents. About 40 miles away there is a town of about 1000 people. If we go "down" for the winter, our other residence has about 10,000 people scattered around a lake. Until about 1989 we lived in a city, a suburb of Los Angeles. I will never go back there. That sounds amazing..

I live in a slightly urban area, its not too big but not that small.

Southern Jarl
Wednesday, July 13th, 2005, 03:56 AM
I live in a Suburban area, always have, and I don't love it, though I'd kill myself if I had to live in an urban area. I always dream about living in a place such as Valkyrie's or Dr. Wolff's (I envy you people!!), but folks always tell me that I would have such a dull life. Don't worry, I don't take this seriously, I think that's just stupid generalization, totally subjective. Similar to when people say that life in Scandinavia is as boring. Funny, none who has told me that has ever lived over there, and none of them but for my grandma has ever been there. And even if they had, it's just plain generalization. Ah..those arguments piss me off!

Appalachian
Friday, July 15th, 2005, 05:55 AM
Rural here.

"When we get piled upon one another in large cities, as in Europe, we shall become corrupt as in Europe, and go to eating one another as they do there."

--Thomas Jefferson

Gefjon
Saturday, November 10th, 2007, 11:52 AM
Thought it would be interesting to see what percentage of Skadi Forum members come from the urban/rural area. Myself, I'm a decadent urban girl. :D

Istigkeit
Saturday, November 10th, 2007, 11:57 AM
I come from a big city in Kentucky. Oxymoron?

Blood_Axis
Saturday, November 10th, 2007, 12:09 PM
Decadent urban girl also... :p

Boche
Saturday, November 10th, 2007, 12:12 PM
From an rural area of course, what's better than nature, silence, and big places you and/or your family own.

I only go to urban areas if i want to go shopping for a whole day, or if there's a special place, like a concert, a cinema or something like this.

In Cities i'm annoyed by the mass of people, tons of different ethnicities. And the disgusting smell which are typical in cities.




Gruß,
Boche

Æmeric
Saturday, November 10th, 2007, 03:33 PM
I can't answer. I was born in a large midwest city, lived in 3 of the ten largest metro areas in the US, but I've also lived in rural areas. I lived in rural areas surrounded by dairy farms & alfalfa fields that became shopping centers & subdivisions :rolleyes:. I currently live in a township that has approximately 1250 inhabitants spread out over 48 square miles.

I feel mostly at home in the outer suburbs or the exburbs - a place with the feel of smalltown life but close to the amenities of the big city.

I am the first generation in my family to be an urbanite - everyone before me in all my ancetoral lines lived in rural areas, in some case in the wilderness. Most of my cousins use to think me & my sisters were just stuckup or weird because of our city ways. We thought they were hillbillies.:D

The Lawspeaker
Saturday, November 10th, 2007, 03:36 PM
I was born in a city and grew up on the countryside, I came to dislike cities and hate having to live in a city (I am now living in one). But I have been invited by friends to move in with them as they are building a house on the Limburg countryside: off course I took the offer


From an rural area of course, what's better than nature, silence, and big places you and/or your family own.

I only go to urban areas if i want to go shopping for a whole day, or if there's a special place, like a concert, a cinema or something like this.

In Cities i'm annoyed by the mass of people, tons of different ethnicities. And the disgusting smell which are typical in cities.


Couldn't agree more. I will end up in a similar situation like you again: I'll study in Maastricht and live outside a small village some 6 miles away from it. Close enough for the shops, and far away enough to avoid the smell.



Met vriendelijke groet,
Lögsögumaður

ladybright
Saturday, November 10th, 2007, 04:05 PM
I was orignially from a rural/small town but have spent of of my life in Urban areas.:( I visted my Grandparents farm in a very rural area all summer from when I was 7 until I was 17. Between that, being a bookworm and my parents keeping a close eye on who I was friends with I semed to avoid much of the big city decadence and indoorness

I am currently on the edge of a city so I can take my daughter to preschool on the city bus but am only 2 miles from orchards and farm stands. I do not like driving so being able to walk to a grocery store and drug store is important. (Walking is my main exersize.)

Elysium
Saturday, November 10th, 2007, 06:29 PM
I was born in a more urbanised area than I am now. I am currently living in between city and country... big houses, lots of trees, not much noise. :)

Chakravartin
Saturday, November 10th, 2007, 06:39 PM
I was born in a most urban centrum of evil and modernization. (http://theeyeofsauron.ytmnd.com/)

I thought it was what one prefers though, so I accidently voted rural instead. :p

sophia
Saturday, November 10th, 2007, 07:03 PM
I was born in London but my parents were (or should I say ARE) hippies (which is how they ended up in London oddly enough, being part of some "scene" lol how disgustingly bourgeois :p) and moved to a small town when I was four years old.
I remember as a child feeling more affinity with the "energy" of cities but now I feel much much more at home in the country. I find cities horribly dehumanising.

Soldier of Wodann
Saturday, November 10th, 2007, 08:05 PM
Born and raised in a small town in Saarland. :D Now I live in a growing city with little/no nature around, sadly.

Cuchulain
Saturday, November 10th, 2007, 08:37 PM
I grew up in a huge city, went to college in the country, and now live back in the city. Can't wait to at least own a small place in the country if not live there full time.

Thusnelda
Saturday, November 10th, 2007, 09:50 PM
I´m a all rural girl, raised up in the low mountain range of the famous Bavarian forest and its lakes and rivers.

http://www.fairkehr.de/fair_0403/reise/bayerwald.jpg

I went to school in a city anyway, and I´m in the city (~30 kilometres away) around 5 times a week. But I´m living in the rural landscape and was raised up there.

Well, I totally prefer the rural enviroment: I love the nature, the air, the monoethnical and conservative composition of the people and the living standard. :) Not even five devils can force me to move into a city!

GreenHeart
Saturday, November 10th, 2007, 11:03 PM
I was born in a city with about 150,000 people at the time, but my parents promptly moved us to a small village, where I spent most of my childhood roaming and exploring the forests, streams, lakes and swamps. I've always felt especially close to the land.

Oswiu
Saturday, November 10th, 2007, 11:57 PM
Hard to answer, really. I grew up in one particular small town that forms part of the Greater Manchester conurbation, but still retains its own different feel, and in which I was only ever ten minutes' or so's ride from countryside with woods and fields. The Hills were only a halfhour's bus ride away too. In fact, the whole area was rather more 'post-urban' than urban, as all the old mills had closed and many were knocked down leaving large expanses of weed grown rubble that we called 'crofts'. I imagined it was like living in the ruins of Rome after the fall of the Empire, as I played in the ruins of what had been a major heartland of the Industrial Revolution. Nowadays, the 'crofts' are gone, having given way for shiny new warehouses and shopping centres...

Now I live in the outskirts of Moscow, and take the Metro to work in the centre. I have to walk through a wood on the way to the station, so it's as though I live out of town in a way.

OneEnglishNorman
Sunday, November 11th, 2007, 12:34 AM
Rural. But because England is so tiny, there are big towns not so far away. I like the rural environment very much.

But I also believe that man improves the rural environs by building (improving) on it - roads, cattle grids, fences, clearing heathland, placing all dangerous animals into captivity, telephone poles and so on.

To be honest urban/rural is a crappy choice. Surely living in a town or city right next to the sea is the best option. Sea=rural, but because it's water, no one can build tower blocks on it and ruin it.

Freydis
Sunday, November 11th, 2007, 04:43 AM
I was born by a city (hospital was there). The first few years of my life I was in a suburb and then we moved to the country when I was 5 or 6. I love it here. I'm glad to be raised here, I think it gives a more realistic outlook ^^. People raised in a city seem a lot different from me; since moving to Toronto I've found we clash on some issues.

Dr. Solar Wolff
Sunday, November 11th, 2007, 05:04 AM
I was born in Los Angeles and raised in the post-war suburbs. At about 42 we moved to a very rural setting. All my family, except one daughter and her family in Seattle, live in a rural setting. None of us ever plan to return to a city.

NUXiY
Sunday, November 11th, 2007, 05:09 AM
A tiny rural village outside Stavanger, South-West Norway. I love it here, and could never even think about moving to the city. Here, I can take a walk in total solitude, without meeting anyone. In the city, that would be impossible. I also got nature all around me where I live :)

http://i5.tinypic.com/6u48etv.jpg

Sigurd
Sunday, November 11th, 2007, 06:30 AM
Now, now...I can't really vote in this poll. I'm really from neither. Fair enough, I was born pretty much what is as central in my hometown Innsbruck (130,000 inhabitants) as can be, but I only lived there for the first two years of my life before my parents divorced, and to be honest - I can't remember much of the living experience of it. ;)

For the next two years, until my mom married my stepdad, my mother and I lived with my grandparents, in a village about 15 kilometres away from it. It's the last house towards the north in the village, so that's as close to nature as it would get.

Well, anyway, when we moved in with my stepdad, that was technically moving back to the city...except that it wasn't. It is so far on the outskirts, that it was, and literally still is less than a 5 minute walk until you're in a green stretch of nature. Besides, I still ended up spending about half of my time at my grandparents', so I experienced a bit of the countryside feel as well.

Anyway, when I came to boarding school in Scotland, that was as rural as it gets ... the nearby village had 200 inhabitants, about 2 miles away from the school; the next town of approx. 5,000 was about 8 miles away and the next "larger" settlement a good 15 miles away, but only counting about 30,000 inhabitants itself, which isn't a "large city" by any stretch of imagination.

Anyway, when I came to university, one of the things (besides the academic aspect etc.) that actually made me go for Aberdeen is the fact that it is less than twice the size of my hometown (220,000 inhabitants), and because once you leave the city you're basically in a beautiful stretch of nature again.

But it was only then that I really realised that I wasn't a city boy *at all*. Having to walk 20 minutes even to the seaside proves a horrendous concept most days, not to speak of it taking half an hour by bus to leave the city (the "central" bus station is right at the opposite end of town). And to be honest - I don't feel comfortable between these blocks of granite. (Though I do have my very special spots nearby which resemble a bit of a village feel - last year the historical Brig o' Balgownie and the adjacent few streets (huge place for romantic walks by the way :D), looking out towards the mouth of the Don was no three minutes away in walking distance.

I sincerely miss home - that idea of being surrounded by our beautiful mountains, that idea of it taking a 200 yards walk to be out of the city, that idea of just being able to visit my beloved woodlands as often as I can without much effort to get there ... I miss it. Even the seaside can only give me so much solitude, but it will never replace that feeling of peace, solitude and even fulfilment that I enjoy when I walk the glades and forests.

When I'm done with university, and finally settle down for good, I'd hope to get a bit of both worlds, but with a *heavy* bias towards country life. That is, it'd ideally have to be pretty much as close to the middle of nowhere as it gets, just outside some small village with a single street, a single pub and a single store ... but still within a distance where public transport can get me to civilisation within reasonable time should the car break down. But as long as I have my forests, my fields and perhaps even that good old little lake nearby, I'm happy.

Well,I still don't know what I should vote for. Before they built the council estate down the road when I was about 12 and all the immigrants, social workers and other lowlifes moved in (sounds stereotypical, but that's really what it is :p), my area of the town didn't know any urban connotations...but we still enjoyed the best of both worlds. That is, until our neighbourhood was turned into hell.

Next World
Sunday, November 11th, 2007, 02:57 PM
Suburban...

We've got lakes and streams and ponds and coastline, forests and marshes and hills and valleys. We're not far from mountains or skyscrapers, although we have neither in the city. It's a pretty docile place, but we have a large number of businesses, and whatever anyone could "want" in a materialistic sense isn't at all hard to get here. The two main hangouts are the mall and the town green. Depending upon one's inclinations, they might favor going for walks in our woods or parks, or going bowling or to "the rec".

We don't have historic "districts" how a lot of places do, our history is spread out throughout the city. The mill over the river the city was named after is still intact, across from our fancy "business deal" restaurant, perhaps a bit ironic, as it is allegedly the same location where the local Amerindian tribe made a deal with the settlers handing our city's territory over. The first church built here is still standing by our new town hall. All of our famous people are stuck down in the graveyard, right alongside those who have recently died. Historic homes open for tours, where little old ladies are dressed up for the purpose of reinactment, are on the same streets as citizens'. We try to keep "big business" along the post road, so that we can still get around the city during the shopping season. Most of our schools follow a semi-romantic code of naming. The high schools are named after their founders--men who rose to the top on their own or something else fancy like that. The middle schools all have nautical themes--East Shore for those in the east district, West Shore for those in the west, and Harborside for those in the middle, right off of the Harbor in town center. The elementary schools--Live Oaks, Pumpkin Delight, Orchard Hills, Calf Pen, Simon Lake, all were given names reflecting the property the school is on. I went to Live Oaks, which was in fact, surrounded by an oak forest. A bit beyond the forest was a marsh that we walked on during ecology club, a little stream ran through it into a pond where we caught tadpoles in kindergarden. Orchard hills still has some apple trees sprouting on the property, and although there are no cows running around at Calf Pen, the "pen" is still intact. We get a decent amount of tourism, mainly older couples, and they always seem to think that some show or movie was filmed here.

We have most of the benefits of urban life (close proximity to desired goods and services, wide selection, lots of "indoor" activities), without too much of the negatives (crime, heterogenic population, pollution, horrible traffic). We also have a lot of the benefits of rural life (a general "peace" about town, fresh air, lots of "outdoor" activities, a sense of closeness [sometimes it is irritating that everyone knows everybody, though], higher levels of safety, better personal care [education]), but we still lack a lot of the good points of a totally rural society (we waste a lot, we can't get much outside of fruits and veggies "fresh", a lot of our scenery gets "sold out" and blocked by expensive condominiums that the rich commuter population doesn't even bother buying).

We can easily get to New York or a few other "big city" sort of places from here, the Yale campus and all of its resources are close by. Yet, it's only a short ways away to go mountain climbing, hiking, or skiing.

I grew up seeing musicals and picnicking in the woods, tending a garden (both on personal and public land) and exploring shops. I think it was a nice childhood, and I don't think it could have been much better. Maybe, if we had a few more "dark zones" set off to reduce light pollution at night. That's the only thing I'm unwaveringly jealous of when I go to rural places.

SwordOfTheVistula
Tuesday, November 13th, 2007, 08:49 AM
Born and lived in subburbs of big cities (LA&NYC) until age 3

Grew up and went to undergrad in rural areas of the midwest

Age 21 to present urban areas including NYC, Boston, and San Antonio

I much prefer the rural areas in general, but urban areas have their advantages as well, as far as job market and finding people with similar interests go

Cythraul
Tuesday, November 13th, 2007, 12:29 PM
Depends on the definitions of "urban" and "rural". My whole life I've lived in a large village, but the distances between here and the nearby towns are small and the boundaries blurred. Furthermore, these big towns are now basically an extended suburb of Greater London, despite the fact that London is 30 miles away. My village is growing and growing, the traffic through it has increased hugely during my lifetime. Actually, the whole South-East of England is becoming so densely saturated that there are very few strictly "rural" places left here.

Whenever I can, I drive or walk to the nearest woods, but they are so small you can usually walk from one side to the other in 20 minutes. I find it really sad and depressing that there's nowhere to explore or get lost in for a day anymore. The countryside calls to me and I plan to relocate to a place where I can answer that call. The Scottish Highlands is a likely candidate.

Bridie
Tuesday, November 13th, 2007, 01:33 PM
I've lived in both rural and city areas throughout my life... my earliest memories were of living in suburban Winnipeg in Canada, then I mostly lived in very isolated rural areas from about the age of 7 onwards, until I left home at the age of 17... ever since then I've lived in the city, but I still feel out of place here... my heart longs for the earthiness, peace and solitude of very sparsely populated countryside... that's where I belong.

Allenson
Tuesday, November 13th, 2007, 02:01 PM
Countryside through and through.... ;)

IlluSionSxxx
Tuesday, November 13th, 2007, 02:17 PM
I'm born and raised in a village of between 1000 and 5000 inhabitants. It's located about 15 km from the most important cities in the area but it also borders various small forests. Besides that, my village of birth is also known for its agriculture and so are some of its neighboring villages.

Hence, I'd say I come from a rural background, though the atmosphere is probably more comparable with a suburb than with the real desolate areas of rural Montana or Russia because Belgium is such a small country and everything is packed together much more densely than in the US or Russia. I find a lot of similarities with the suburban character Next World described in his latest post.

In Belgium, even the most isolated towns are located no more than 50 km from one of the greater cities in the area. However, we don't have any real big cities. Some of the greatest cities in Belgium are :

Brussels (1.031.215 inhabitants; for the entire Brussels district)
Antwerp (466.203 inhabitants)
Gent (235.143 inhabitants)
Charleroi (201.550 inhabitants)
Liege (188.907 inhabitants)
Namur (107.653 inhabitants)In total, we have about 10.392.226 inhabitants in the entire country.

Drakkar
Wednesday, November 14th, 2007, 09:24 PM
I was born in a medium sized town, moved to Hessen for a few years as a baby for my dad to help unify Germany, then I moved into military installations that are neither "rural" nor "city".. I returned to the civilian world when I moved to New England where my family was from originally and have lived there ever since. For the majority of my life I have resided in a small quaint seaside town, so I just put down rural.

Birka
Wednesday, November 14th, 2007, 10:57 PM
I would turn down tripling my income if it involved a move to a large city.

Hohenheim
Thursday, November 15th, 2007, 10:48 AM
Well, I was born in a city, and lived the most of my life here. But a large part of it I've also spent on the country. As I like rural areas more the urban, and taking into account that my parents and all my ancestors have been born in the countryside, I see it as my true home, and thus voted for 'rural'.

And these are the magic lands for wich my heart beats. Home to elfs, vampires, forest and lake spirits, and many other creatures...

http://album.rumba.ee/albums/kaur/Bosnia/92_magilehmad.sized.jpg

http://www.zone-2000.net/gallery/wallp/_hires04.jpg

http://www.umoljani.com/web/images/zoom/sela/selo1.jpg

http://www.borasnica.ba/slike/prenj7.jpg

When I was a child, my parents used to dress me like this while spending my days in the countyside. It's the traditional national costume (not 100 % like this on the pic, but almost the same).

http://www.bosnafolk.com/sehara/nnosnje/images/19.jpg

Cythraul
Thursday, November 15th, 2007, 11:52 AM
Great post Hohenheim. Beautiful pictures. But may I ask how you reconcile belief in mythical pagan creatures with a Christian faith? I'm not trying to be antagonistic, I'm just really curious.

Hohenheim
Thursday, November 15th, 2007, 03:36 PM
Great post Hohenheim. Beautiful pictures. But may I ask how you reconcile belief in mythical pagan creatures with a Christian faith? I'm not trying to be antagonistic, I'm just really curious.

I don't believe in such creatures. Or... I never thought about their existence, nor would it have any impact on my life, and is therefor no matter of importance for me. Why I mentioned them in my post is because I love the 'idea' of the, I like old folk tales and legends.

Ferryman
Thursday, November 15th, 2007, 03:47 PM
Urban male here! Allthough I like spending time outdoors and the summer cottage I dislike the atmosphere of hillbilly villages.

Schmetterling
Tuesday, January 8th, 2008, 02:09 PM
I live in the urban area. I currently live in Nashville, the second most populated city in Tennessee.

Northern Paladin
Tuesday, January 8th, 2008, 05:41 PM
I spent most of my childhood living in small towns. Not exactly rural, more like suburban. I grew up in town where you could walk everywhere, me and my friends rode bikes and went fishing every other day. Nothing like the carefree innocence of childhood. I'm not a fan of big cities because their usually infested with undesirables. In Europe it's XXXslims, in America its Homo Africanus. Right now I go to College in a very Urban Area. Can't stand it.

The Horned God
Tuesday, January 8th, 2008, 06:18 PM
Semi-Rural. I live about 5 miles away from a town of about 5,000 people. The county has a population of about 50,000 in all. This number probably sounds quite low compared to a county in say, England, but nevertheless there are houses seemingly everywhere you look. This is certainly the case where I live in the eastern part of the county, so my surroundings certainly don't feel remote.

Siebenbürgerin
Saturday, March 22nd, 2008, 12:28 AM
Urban. I am from Hermannstadt, a city with a Population of 160,000. It isn't very big and it is an old City, very comfortable and with much Culture. Around it there are Villages and nice Landscape. So, while I live in the Urban Area, it doesn't feel very modern and urbanized. You can see the Hills and Mountains from here.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d5/Sibiuphoto.jpg

theTasmanian
Saturday, March 22nd, 2008, 01:37 AM
I live in a small town (tinny by euro and US standards) its in a farming river valley so its rural..mostly

population of approximately 2690 ;)

Eccardus Teutonicus
Monday, March 31st, 2008, 08:44 PM
Farm country, USA. Recently overrun by yuppies with their golden retrievers building McMansions all over the place and forcing farmers off their land. I was really glad to see when the Earth Liberation Front burned that new development out in Oregon to the ground. I wish more people would do stuff like that.

Thrymheim
Tuesday, April 1st, 2008, 04:09 PM
I grew up in a small village pop 200 but ever since leaving home have been a city person, I find village life too slow and sleepy, however I would never raise children in a town or city, hypocrite, me, no!

Oswiu
Thursday, April 3rd, 2008, 02:31 PM
Recently overrun by yuppies with their golden retrievers

Good Lord, they do that over there too?!? :p

My aunt's husband has such pretensions and bought exactly that sort of dog. He wouldn't be seen walking anything else, and even said as much - proving how it's all about Show. Annoying thing is though, that it's possibly the breed least suited to this sort of people, being a real working dog. Naturally, when I mind it on occasion, I see that it's become totally spoilt. A sin. :mad:

I am 'socially secure', and have a Jack Russell terrier cross, and am quite happy with that. :D I'd have a whippet, but then I'd be going too far in being the caricature of Lancastrian working man...

SwordOfTheVistula
Friday, April 4th, 2008, 04:51 AM
I grew up in a small village pop 200 but ever since leaving home have been a city person, I find village life too slow and sleepy, however I would never raise children in a town or city, hypocrite, me, no!

Not uncommon at all. NYC and Boston were fun to live in for my early-mid 20s, but they don't make a good environment to raise children in.

A political theorist has written about this phenomenon and attributes America's "red state-blue state" political divide to it:


http://www.amconmag.com/2004_12_06/cover.html

To understand what’s driving this huge political phenomenon, you have to think like a real-estate shopper, not like an intellectual. Everybody loves to talk real estate, but the sharp insights into how the world works that you hear while shooting the breeze about houses and neighborhoods seldom work their way into prestigious discourse about public affairs.

As you’ve seen on all those red-blue maps, most of America’s land is red, even though Kerry won 48 percent of the vote. Even excluding vast Alaska, Bush’s counties are only one-fourth as densely populated on average as Kerry’s counties. Lower density helps explain why red regions both attract the baby-oriented and encourage larger families among those already there.

A dozen years ago, University of Chicago sociologist Edward O. Laumann and others wrote a tome with the soporific postmodern title The Social Organization of Sexuality. I wrote to them and suggested a follow-up called The Sexual Organization of Society because, in my experience with Chicago, where people lived coincided with their sexual status. In 1982, when I moved to Chicago as a young single man, I sought out detailed advice on where the greatest density of pretty girls lived and there rented a 21st-floor apartment with a stunning view of Lake Michigan. I became engaged three years later, and so, mission accomplished, I moved to a less chic neighborhood with more affordable rents. Two years later, when my bride became pregnant, we relocated to an even more unfashionable spot where we could buy ample square footage. (To my satisfaction, Laumann’s team just this year published a categorization of Chicago’s neighborhoods entitled The Sexual Organization of the City.)

My experience is hardly unusual. Singles often move to cities because the density of other singles makes them good places to become unsingle. But singles, especially women, generally vote Democratic. For example, in the 2002 midterm elections, only 39 percent of unmarried women and 44 percent of unmarried men voted for a GOP candidate for the House of Representatives. In contrast, 56 percent of married women voted for the GOP, similar to their husbands’ 58 percent. The celebrated gender gap is, in truth, largely a marriage gap among women.

When city couples marry, they face major decisions: do they enjoy the adult-oriented cultural amenities of the city so much that they will stick it out, or do they head for the suburbs, exurbs, or even the country to afford more space for a growing family?

Couples attempting to raise children in a big blue city quickly learn the truth of what bond trader Sherman McCoy’s father told him in Tom Wolfe’s Bonfire of the Vanities: “If you want to live in New York, you’ve got to insulate, insulate, insulate.” Manhattan liberals all believe in celebrating diversity in theory but typically draw the line at subjecting their own offspring to it in the public schools. With Manhattan private K-12 school tuitions now approaching $25,000, insulating multiple children rapidly becomes too expensive for all but the filthy rich.

In tempting contrast, the cost-of-living calculator provided by Realtor.com says that a $100,000 salary in liberal Manhattan buys only as much as a $38,000 salary in conservative Pinehurst, North Carolina. Likewise, a San Francisco couple earning $100,000 between them can afford just as much in Cedar City, Utah if the husband can find a $44,000-a-year job—and then the wife can stay home with their children. Moreover, the culture of Cedar City is more conducive to child rearing than San Francisco. Having insulated themselves through distance rather than money, they can now send their kids to public schools. (Among red states, the South has lower white fertility than the northern Great Plains and Great Basin, perhaps because many Southern conservatives, like many Manhattan liberals, prefer private schools, which makes children more expensive than out in Lewis & Clark Country, where the public schools are popular because they aren’t terribly diverse.) In Cedar City, the wife won’t feel as unprestigious for being a stay-at-home mom as she would in San Francisco. And mom won’t have to chauffeur the kids everywhere because traffic and crime are light enough that they can ride their bikes.

More by the same author on the subject:

http://isteve.blogspot.com/2005/02/dirt-gap-california-vs-texas.html

http://www.amconmag.com/2008/2008_02_11/article.html

http://www.isteve.com/babygap.htm

Guntwachar
Friday, April 4th, 2008, 05:06 AM
I am born in a city and lived there a few years then we moved to villages and i grew up between the farmers, now i live in a Town not big not to small alot of nature,history and a house next to the sea.
I think this little Town is a great place to grow up so i would rather let kids grow up here then in a horrible city like Zoetermeer.

Herkus
Friday, April 18th, 2008, 11:16 AM
Now I live in a huge city as there I can earn for a living. But I still hope that I will be able to settle in a peaceful, silent village one day....

Blood_Axis
Friday, April 18th, 2008, 11:19 AM
http://www.optodesign.ca/urbangreeks/wp-content/uploads/2006/11/athens2.jpg

:rolleyes: :(

Allenson
Friday, April 18th, 2008, 03:11 PM
Took this photo just a couple of days ago:

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3019/2419640656_1238961e25_b.jpg

Thusnelda
Friday, April 18th, 2008, 04:25 PM
Our rural areas have very much in common, Allenson. :) The same soft hills, forests...just nature! Looks like parts of New England look like Eastern Bavaria. :)

http://www.nationalparkregion.de/typo3temp/pics/4c2b27186f.jpg

http://www.redemund.de/B58.jpg

Allenson
Friday, April 18th, 2008, 04:45 PM
Looks familiar indeed, Valkyrie. :)

We just don't have beer girls: ;)


http://www.hickerphoto.com/data/media/181/traditional-bavaria-germany_9696.jpg

Deary
Friday, April 18th, 2008, 08:51 PM
I live in an urban area in a small city called Pensacola. The population density is low and everything is relatively spread out so there is no feeling of being crowded. We don't suffer from an excess of clustered or high structures. It's also quiet. There's much nature to be appreciated even downtown. Thirty minutes away from there you can reach the small towns, farmlands and backwoods. Beaches are more abundant. It often surprises me when I travel to big cities how there is so little water, grass, trees or plants that it is almost exclusive to parks and gardens. I do love architecture, but can't imagine living in any concrete jungle. There has to be a bit of both worlds :)

OneEnglishNorman
Friday, April 18th, 2008, 09:18 PM
I wish I had a camera on me sometimes, the sunsets around here are stunning. Not spectacular vistas, but when the sky is deep blue and the sun setting and horses & cows are grazing next to each other by a stream, you just find yourself standing there like an idiot with your mouth open, it's so beautiful.

Allenson
Friday, April 18th, 2008, 09:55 PM
I wish I had a camera on me sometimes,

I take mine wherever I go....


Click! :D

mischak
Friday, April 18th, 2008, 11:20 PM
I grew up in a relatively small town, surrounded by farmland, with mountains to the east and hilly land to the west. I voted rural but it's hard to say because there was a pretty large city 20-25 miles away. I'm sure some people can even figure out the area I grew up in now :o.

Anyway I think we remained pretty isolated.. so I still say rural

http://i30.tinypic.com/24dq04m.jpg

theTasmanian
Saturday, April 19th, 2008, 12:28 AM
Latrobe.......and Devonport where i use to live

http://i57.photobucket.com/albums/g226/theMISSIONARY_257/Latrobe.jpg

Bärin
Tuesday, April 29th, 2008, 03:37 PM
Urban, but the inhabitant of a fine German city. :)


http://farm1.static.flickr.com/6/85752965_1df881d984.jpg

Besides, there are green areas (http://forums.skadi.net/showthread.php?t=6479) in this city which make it an enjoyable place. I don't necessarily have to go to the rural areas for relaxation. :)

Crabby Badger
Thursday, September 18th, 2008, 04:40 AM
I have lived in both and think both have their points. But right now my husband and I are planning on moving to a rural lesser populated state / place.

Haereticus
Monday, January 5th, 2009, 11:40 PM
Happily I'm living in a fairly rural location now. I've lived in cities years ago.

I get depressed in cities. I remember, when I had to work in London, the pleasure of leaving it on a train. The view from the window just gets better and better as I get further from the city and closer to home. :)

Octothorpe
Thursday, January 15th, 2009, 02:37 AM
I was born and raised on a farm in West-Central Illinois, where we raised sheep and hogs. The neighbors down the road cropped corn and soybeans, the folks down the road the other direction had cattle. Ahhhh.

Now I live in a small town that is part of a burgeoning conurbation in northern Illinois. I live here because it's where my job is, and my loving wife is a suburban girl, through and through. If I fell into a pot of money, I'd hightail back down home (or further south!) so quick it'd make your head spin! :)

Sissi
Thursday, January 15th, 2009, 03:27 AM
I hail from the urban area. I'm from Vienna. I like big and old European cities like mine, with a long history, lots of culture and tradition. :)

White Africa
Sunday, July 26th, 2009, 08:19 PM
I'm from a city, so I vote urban.

Sól
Wednesday, November 4th, 2009, 07:41 AM
Urban. I'm from the capital.

Einsiedler
Wednesday, November 4th, 2009, 08:23 AM
Well, I'm the son of a farmer (cattle), but there is of course almost no place in Germany that deserves the moniker "rural".

Anyway, it would be incorrect to call myself "suburban". It's more like "drowned in shit".

Alfadur
Friday, July 8th, 2011, 03:59 PM
We on this forum are Germanic people from all over the world, and live in very different places. So I started this thread about living areas just out of curiosity.

What type of area do you live in? An inner city, a suburb, or in the countryside? Which of those is your favorite setting, and which one do you think is best for Germanic people to live in?

Goomer
Friday, July 8th, 2011, 04:08 PM
We on this forum are Germanic people from all over the world, and live in very different places. So I started this thread about living areas just out of curiosity.

What type of area do you live in? An inner city, a suburb, or in the countryside? Which of those is your favorite setting, and which one do you think is best for Germanic people to live in?

A 'burb. But, as far as the burbs go that are associated with Seattle or Tacoma (our two closest large cities), we are equidistant from both of them....so really we are more of a town.

I like nature. But, I like the city for what it has to offer. Thus, we live in a good place because both are available. My guess is that Germanic people should live a little closer to nature than they currently do. It's good for the soul.

Rocky v
Friday, July 8th, 2011, 04:38 PM
I live in an inner city urban jungle. I'm used to it now and of course living in a big city does have its advantages such as employment opportunities and things to do. Also has major crime disadvantages though.

I think most Germans are at home in a forest or woods. I know the forest always calls to me (especially in Wurttemberg), like I want to walk in and never return to civillization.

Thusnelda
Friday, July 8th, 2011, 05:12 PM
I think it´s already well known that I live in the countryside - the remote area of the Bavarian Forest in the eastern parts of Bavaria.

http://www.alpen-guide.de/m/image/db/34603.jpeg

Our landscape:

http://img.fotocommunity.com/Natur/Landschaft/Postkarte-Bayerischer-Wald-a17821214.jpg

http://images.interchalet.com/teaser/bayerischer_wald_ferienhaus.jpg

http://res000.gps-tour.info/redx/tools/mb_image.php/file.x615a6b3443706e6673324e4d6f646a4b50 7461336f574a6d376138633755656e4e446e3370 71516851494173555632725554315248773d3d/gid.8/kl._Arbersee.jpg

http://www.stadtdatenbank.de/lifepr/files/attachment-141126-winter.jpg

I think I could never live in a big city because I need my nature and our remote lifestyle around me. :)

TXRog
Friday, July 8th, 2011, 05:15 PM
I think it´s already well known that I live in the countryside - the remote area of the Bavarian Forest in the eastern parts of Bavaria.

http://www.alpen-guide.de/m/image/db/34603.jpeg

Our landscape:

http://img.fotocommunity.com/Natur/Landschaft/Postkarte-Bayerischer-Wald-a17821214.jpg

http://images.interchalet.com/teaser/bayerischer_wald_ferienhaus.jpg

http://www.stadtdatenbank.de/lifepr/files/attachment-141126-winter.jpg

I think I could never live in a big city because I need my nature and our remote lifestyle around me. :)

You are truly blessed sister Thusnelda.

My German ancestors are from this very part of Germany and I look forward to one day traveling there to research my family roots.

Perhaps you could be my tour guide?:D

Patrioten
Friday, July 8th, 2011, 05:23 PM
I grew up in a city in a medium-density, mainly residential area. I currently live in a different city in a high density residential area which looks like a throwback to the Soviet union. I very much enjoyed the city and area where I grew up whilst my current living area leaves much to be wanted, it has no character as opposed to my hometown. However, since my current situation is merely a stepping stone it's bearable, I'll relocate soon enough.

TXRog
Friday, July 8th, 2011, 05:25 PM
For now the city, but I am only about 30 minutes from rural areas.

My lifelong dream has been to live in an area of Texas called the Hill Country, which was ironically settled by large numbers of German immigrants beginning in the 1850's.

As previously mentioned, my German ancestors originated from rural southern Bavaria and I am told were farmers (wish some of them were still there farming).

Perhaps this explains why I have always been drawn to the country - obviously "my German roots run deep." :D

Wulfram
Friday, July 8th, 2011, 05:27 PM
I was raised in a city with a population of 115,000. I used to think that was too small, now I think it is too large! Currently I live in Austin, which has about a million people within its metropolis, and this does not include the illegal immigrants. One thing I did enjoy while I was a kid was that we lived on the peripheral of the city, right on Lake Waco. This provided myself and friends with opportunities to explore the woods and beaches surrounding it. A much better environment than the kids who grew up in the city itself.

Alfadur
Friday, July 8th, 2011, 06:10 PM
Most of the year, I live in an urban area in Skåne. It's rather ugly. But on the plus side, it's very close to the green and beautiful countryside. :)

Recently, Sweden has had a growth of suburbs in the American style, those countless neat villa houses outside the cities.

Hilderinc
Friday, July 8th, 2011, 06:23 PM
Recently, Sweden has had a growth of suburbs in the American style, those countless neat villa houses outside the cities.

You mean row upon row ugly, bland houses that look exactly the same? :shrug





Anyway, I live in a small town. You drive a half dozen blocks and you're in a cornfield. Even our Walmart is next to two big grain silos. Although, unfortunately, more big chain businesses have been moving in, tearing up fields and forests (though we don't have many forests) to build them.

Thusnelda
Friday, July 8th, 2011, 08:11 PM
For those who are interested in my home region: Here´s a very well made promotion video of the Bavarian Forest with great and professional footage. :) If you can spare 9 minutes, watch it.

yUH0i9NBmEY

BjrK
Saturday, August 20th, 2011, 08:30 PM
Most of the year, I live in an urban area in Skåne. It's rather ugly. But on the plus side, it's very close to the green and beautiful countryside. :)

Recently, Sweden has had a growth of suburbs in the American style, those countless neat villa houses outside the cities.

Also known as white flight. :D

I live in an actual city but rather at the end of it, it is usually couples with a child or two who moves to were I live since its a safe area for children. Usually I see alot of Swedish females (usually pretty aswell) with their cute little swedish children, mixing filth keeps themselves in the bad areas. Thank god so I dont have to yell at them and humiliate them.

Austin
Sunday, August 21st, 2011, 10:17 AM
I was raised in a city with a population of 115,000. I used to think that was too small, now I think it is too large! Currently I live in Austin, which has about a million people within its metropolis, and this does not include the illegal immigrants. One thing I did enjoy while I was a kid was that we lived on the peripheral of the city, right on Lake Waco. This provided myself and friends with opportunities to explore the woods and beaches surrounding it. A much better environment than the kids who grew up in the city itself.

People who grew up in the city areas of Austin are very messed up indeed. I'd describe it as the worst elements of spoiled-naive-liberalism that I've ever seen. I grew up in San Antonio though so people in Austin are always amusing when they say they have a lot of Mexicans. Try living in a 75% Mexican city with a 20% population of actual illegal aliens that don't know a word of English and then see how ya feel lol!

Austin is still a very white city compared to San Antonio. Austin has at least a 50% white populace maybe more and I can feel it just walking around, never seen so many white people in my life. In San Antonio there are many places where you just simply won't see anyone who doesn't have black hair and is any taller than 5'5. The bars in Austin have a majority of white people in them. This is simply stunning coming from San Antonio. I come from a world where even in the white areas of the city you will be lucky to find any bar or club with even 30% whites at any given time. It's all Mexicans speaking Spanish.

BritishLad
Sunday, August 21st, 2011, 10:48 AM
I live in the suburbs about half a mile out from the city

Sindig_og_stoisk
Sunday, August 21st, 2011, 11:40 AM
I was born and raised in a suburban neighbourhood in the north, and only moved into the city (Copenhagen) in order to attend university. Coming from a posh and affluent suburb and then moving into the city was really eye-opening:

The sight of drunkards looking for a fight in the metro, Danish school children mixing freely with Muslim children and befriending them was something that would never happen up north.
People in the bus who dressed like Negro gangsters and walked with a their head towards the ground, hunchbacked and with their hands in the pocket was also a rare sight up north, but apparently quite normal in the city.
Not to mention left wing radicals in their shabby clothes and the left wing nut cases with bizarre hair cuts and piercings.

In conclusion, people in the city are really ugly and the only thing more heinous about them then their grooming are their manners and life-styles. I can barely wait to finish university and move back north.
I suppose it is not the city per se that is the problem, as there are also plenty of decent folks here. But a city is simply a place where bad people tend to gather. More anonymity, more squalor to hide and wallow in.

Blackened_Might
Sunday, August 21st, 2011, 08:34 PM
I've lived in the suburbs for most of my life. Eventually, I'll relocate to a more decent area.

Angela
Monday, August 22nd, 2011, 09:14 AM
I was born in a rural area but I'm now living in a city. I enjoy my life right now in the city but if/when I marry and get children I want to live in the countyside or at least in a suburb.

Thorbrand
Monday, August 22nd, 2011, 11:31 AM
I live in deep countryside - I have lived in the heart of a city (Johannesburg) which in the period I was there was turning into a ghetto and completely lawless, I have lived in suburbs (London) which was impersonal. Now, finally I live in a place where there is a sense of community (amongst the widespread rural population) and where there is security and beauty for my family.

Lady Vengeance
Monday, August 22nd, 2011, 12:15 PM
I'm a city girl, always have been. I grew up in urban areas, wouldn't want to live and work anywhere else than the big city. But I love the countryside too, especially in summertime. :)


or at least in a suburb.
The suburbs are no answer to anything, IMO. They're destroyers of community and joie de vivre. I’d rather start a charity for Robert Mugabe than live my whole life in a boring sterile suburb. There's still many urban areas that aren’t rape central.

Schneider
Monday, August 22nd, 2011, 12:19 PM
[QUOTE= There's still many urban areas that aren’t rape central.[/QUOTE]

That's not good enough for my family.

Blackened_Might
Monday, August 22nd, 2011, 04:09 PM
No way in Hel would I ever live in a city. The non- white infested Floridian middle class suburbs are bad enough. If I have a choice and I'm to ever move to another suburb, it will be an upper middle class complex.

Ocko
Monday, August 22nd, 2011, 04:14 PM
Born on the countryside, grew up on the countryside, studied in big cities went back to countryside.

I need the fresh air and healthy environment, contact to nature, space around me. So further the neighbor lives away so better relations I have to them.

Silent_Saxon
Monday, August 22nd, 2011, 04:21 PM
I live in the country. I don't like to be around many people. The college town where I live now is even in the country. It's a campus surrounded by soybean fields and forests. :thumbup

Hamar Fox
Monday, August 22nd, 2011, 04:30 PM
I live on the rural/urban fringe of Leeds. It doesn't suck as much as most modern British cities, but it still has its share of inferior races. Work and education have forced me to spend quite a lot of time slap bang in the middle of the city, but when I visit places by pure volition, they're always either rural or historical small cities and market towns. I'd rather drink a bucket of AIDS than live in a large city.