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Astrid Runa
Thursday, June 2nd, 2011, 07:26 PM
I was reading a book the other day (Skulduggery Pleasant, to be exact, hehe :D) and the topic of Necromancy was mentioned. I'd heard of it before, but never really knew what it was all about.
So I read up some more on the subject, and found it to be quite interesting.
The whole history behind it, what it's all about, I found it really fascinating.

I want to know the opinions of the people here on Skadi.
What are your views on Necromancy? Is it good or bad in your eyes?

Turin son of Hurin
Thursday, June 2nd, 2011, 07:32 PM
It's as good as christianity.

Elessar
Thursday, June 2nd, 2011, 07:42 PM
It's as good as christianity.

:fhdclap: Profound insight

On subject of heathenry, Odin himself is considered a Necromancer.

Hávamál
156.
A twelfth I know: if I see in a tree
a corpse from a halter hanging,
such spells I write, and paint in runes,
that the being descends and speaks.

And from Wikipedia

Norse mythology also contains examples of necromancy (Ruickbie, 2004:48), such as the scene in the Völuspá in which Odin summons a seeress from the dead to tell him of the future. In Grógaldr, the first part of Svipdagsmál, the hero Svipdag summons his dead Völva mother, Gróa, to cast spells for him. In Hrólf Kraki's saga, the half-elven princess Skuld was very skilled in witchcraft (seiđr), and this to the point that she was almost invincible in battle. When her warriors fell, she made them rise again to continue fighting.

I think if you're truly dedicated and prepared for such a practice, then by all means. But I myself wouldn't delve into such things. It's not necessarily good or bad, just something which has been frowned upon for the last millennia.

Ocko
Thursday, June 2nd, 2011, 07:48 PM
It works

Neophyte
Thursday, June 2nd, 2011, 08:08 PM
Necromancy is basically shamanism, and Oden has all the aspects and attributes of a shaman; for starters he rides a horse with eight legs/hoofs to the underworld. That is about as shamanistic as it gets.

So, necromancy and shamanism had a profound importance for our Heathen ancestors.

Interestingly, in Norse legend Seid (Norse shamanism) was always considered a female art, and it was also something that Oden, with the other Aesir, had learned from Freja, the great goddess. You should also note that shamanistic practices, when practised by males, have always had a transgendered aspect to them.

You might find Shamanism by Mircea Eliade interesting. Jenny Blain has written a seemingly promising book called Nine Worlds of Seid-Magic: Ecstasy and Neo-Shamanism in North European Paganism, but since it is on my to-read list I really cannot vouch for it.

Leof
Thursday, June 2nd, 2011, 09:18 PM
Necromancy, before modern influence altered what it meant, is a form of divination that involves consorting with the dead. Greece I believe it was popularized the term and the practice in antiquity (though a quick wiki search can clarify that but I don't want to be a walking wiki link today :D).

In folk magic there are some records of people raising the dead as servants but naturally such people were seen and untrustworthy and dangerous by their neighbors. All forms of magic can be seen as tools much like a shovel or a screwdriver. It's the persons intentions and the end outcome that determine if something is right or wrong. In regards to disturbing someone's remains however it could raise some moral or ethical issues.

Sigurd
Thursday, June 2nd, 2011, 09:24 PM
Interestingly, in Norse legend Seid (Norse shamanism) was always considered a female art [...] You should also not that shamanistic practices, when practised by males, have always had a transgendered aspect to them.

Seidh was, amongst humans, restricted to women, but this need not mean that something akin cannot be practiced by men. It is of course true that women will have clear advantages, and that some of the qualities associated are typically feminine.

I recall a good post by Ocko once where he stated that whilst this intuitive retelling is feminine in nature, that a man needn't be ergi to be a practitioner of Seidh or another type of shamanism. You can read the post here (http://forums.skadi.net/showpost.php?p=993336&postcount=12), very insightful.

In either instance, being at a reasonably level of spiritual awareness helps. Actual Seidh can be technically practiced by a male (though he should adapt an own form) without going effeminate, but the lower the level of spiritual awareness, the higher the danger of developing effeminate traits. ;)

A book I found to be insightful (and certainly untainted by his otherwise New-Age predicament) into Seidh-work and other shamanic practices would be Seidways by Jan Fries; also since it allows for different levels of expertise to enjoy the techniques and insights gained.

ulfrik
Friday, June 3rd, 2011, 05:20 AM
I thought men practiced runes instead of Seid?
Aren't runes different than Seid?

I think Odin obtained his necromantic spells from the runes he discovered during his self sacrifice hanging from the world tree yggdrasil.

Elessar
Friday, June 3rd, 2011, 05:29 AM
I thought men practiced runes instead of Seid?
Aren't runes different than Seid?

I think Odin obtained his necromantic spells from the runes he discovered during his self sacrifice hanging from the world tree yggdrasil.

You're an Odinist and you don't know about your own religion?

We find in Lokasenna that Odin learned his skills from Freyja and/or the völva in Völuspá, as they're mainly attributed with the art, an un-masculine practice, how he could have learned it himself grasping the runes is beyond me.

Loki spake:
24. "They say that with spells | in Samsey once
Like witches with charms didst thou work;
And in witch's guise | among men didst thou go;
Unmanly thy soul must seem."

Runelore is different from Seidr, but both are practices of divination any sex can technically do.

ulfrik
Friday, June 3rd, 2011, 06:30 AM
Yes I am an odinist.
However I dont practice newage asatru or go to parks a do rituals or anything like that.

Rather I read a lot about Odin and the eddas and the haritage of our people.

Perhaps I should read more sagas as they have lots of info about norse magic.
It would be interesting to learn more about skin changers ,runes and things like that in norse lore.

I think Odin does use runes for Necromancy as it says here in the rune poem section of the havamal- "Hávamál
156.
A twelfth I know: if I see in a tree
a corpse from a halter hanging,
such spells I write, and paint in runes,
that the being descends and speaks"

(In my opinion) As for lokasenna, I think any poem where the gods sit around and talk like some kind of greek play would probably have a bunch of christian corruptions in it.
(There's a lot of norse mythology in the eddas and sagas, It's just that one must take some of them with a grain of salt because of all the christian corruptions.)

Elessar
Friday, June 3rd, 2011, 06:41 AM
I think Odin does use runes for Necromancy as it says here in the rune poem section of the havamal- "Hávamál
156.
A twelfth I know: if I see in a tree
a corpse from a halter hanging,
such spells I write, and paint in runes,
that the being descends and speaks"

>implying he would have to know the spell before executing by use of Runes, whose magical properties are inherent in and of themselves.


(In my opinion) As for lokasenna, I think any poem where the gods sit around and talk like some kind of greek play would probably have a bunch of christian corruptions in it.
(There's a lot of norse mythology in the eddas and sagas, It's just that one must take some of them with a grain of salt because of all the christian corruptions.)
There's nothing corrupt in the presentation of the story in the given format or in the information given, the burden of proof would lie in the accuser to provide some other perspective of how the story really goes by way of there being no "christian corruptions".
If you're so worried of "christian corruption", whom you have to thank for there even surviving any mythology at all, I'm not sure why you're a heathen at all. The mere basis of founding a 20th century pagan religion on the validity of 1000 year old secondhand texts made by those who weren't even practitioners of the religion doesn't make much sense, you have to admit.

ulfrik
Friday, June 3rd, 2011, 07:35 AM
I understand what youre saying Elessar.
Like I said There's a lot of norse mythology in the eddas and sagas, It's just that one must take some of them with a grain of salt because of all the christian corruptions.

I know that the eddas and sagas that were written down by christian can be a good source of information if you dont take them too literally and can understand the mytholigy.

Also there are other ways to learn about the gods of our people. like for example pre christian rune carvings and archaeological finds.

As for my opinion on Necromancy. I think that if this supernatural ability could actually be conjured. one would have to be be careful ,you dont know what consequences might ensue.

Leof
Friday, June 3rd, 2011, 09:16 AM
This thread is slowly blooming out into magic, religion and everything in between.:D

Magic itself, despite being so obsessed over in our time is something so incredibly misunderstood and poorly represented. It is not one but a multitude of phenomena that the sweeping catchall term of magic cannot hope to articulate.

Necromancy/Sorcery and Shamanism shouldn't be confused despite their close resemblance. There's some evidence that shamanism was introduced to the Germanic tribes by the Huns in and around the time of the Goth-Hun wars.

This and sorcery are clearly distinguished in both language and in recorded epics and folk tales. Seid and the magic practiced by priests clearly seem to carry a different social connotation. Seid itself seems foreign however by the time of the vikings had become a part of society.

The main difference between a Necromancer/Sorcerer and a Shaman is that a Shaman will summon a spirit into himself or travel to the spirit world in a trance to seek audience. A necromancer instead uses the body of the departed as a vessel.

Was necromancy practiced by pre-Christian Germanics? We can't really use the Sagas and Eddas as a text book. Snorri was, after all, a Christian preserving these stories and poems in order to preserve Icelandic culture. Not to help out 20th century reconstructionists. Nonetheless, the tone of Voluspa seems very similar to necromancy in Greece. The whole poem is a dialog between the gods and a resurrected sorceress who can see into the future.

There are a few necromancy spells in the various Icelandic grimoires however the Icelandic traditions of sorcery and witchcraft borrow heavily from latin and continental sources just as well as their own.

The best line I can think of from a grimoire was from the Picatrix in which the author said, "because this works by an unknown science we call it magic". That is the best description I've ever come across for what magic is.

@Ulfrik,

There unfortunately is no bible equivalent for heathens. The forerunners, in their insanity, expect all those curious about the faith to do their own research; piecing together archeology, reading old stories and studying philology! All just because they don't want to sound Christian and say they know better than someone else does. The problem with this line of thought is that without a structured view there is no way to correct an error universally when new evidence is found and it allows less altruistic people to exploit the ignorance of newcomers.

If you want to learn more the best answer I can give you is to try and hunt down some university level text books. There are Danish books on the subject that have their whole curriculum in English though they are hard to come by.

As you probably know, the vast number of books on amazon are nothing but expensive toilet paper.

Neophyte
Friday, June 3rd, 2011, 11:32 AM
Necromancy/Sorcery and Shamanism shouldn't be confused despite their close resemblance. There's some evidence that shamanism was introduced to the Germanic tribes by the Huns in and around the time of the Goth-Hun wars.

The Urheimat of all Germanic tribes is Scandinavia, so it is clear that our people have spent thousands of years in close contact with the Sami, and in that culture shamanism is still live and kicking.


The main difference between a Necromancer/Sorcerer and a Shaman is that a Shaman will summon a spirit into himself or travel to the spirit world in a trance to seek audience. A necromancer instead uses the body of the departed as a vessel.

In Norse tradition it was a relatively common practice to meditate on burial mounds or in the presence of a hanged man.

Sigurd
Friday, June 3rd, 2011, 11:44 AM
The Urheimat of all Germanic tribes is Scandinavia, so it is clear that our people have spent thousands of years in close contact with the Sami, and in that culture shamanism is still live and kicking.

This is an old misconception, resulting from the old opinion of an expert for Prehistory and Ancient History, Franz Gustaf Kosinna, and is no longer the legitimate preposition.

By opinion of Prof. Jürgen Udolph, on a chair of onomastics (id est, the study of names) in Leipzig, the Urheimat would have to be expected where the eldest form Germanic settlement names are, and indeed (and more importantly) river names of indo-European provenience on the verge of becoming Germanics.

He is correct in postulating that river names are the clearest pointer of an Urheimat, considering that potamonyms are, similar to oronyms (mountain names), particularly conservative in that they are at best phonologically adapted but very rarely completely newly named (and much more conservative than settlement names, though they are also, fairly conservative).

The earliest existence of Germanics would, on that account have to be postulated not in Denmark, not in Sweden and not in Slesvig-Holstein, but indeed in Lower Saxony. :)

arvak
Friday, June 3rd, 2011, 12:44 PM
There is a absalute truth that women have the advantage over spirit jeourneying.
But if a man following the path of Odin wishes such a power he will have to sacrifice himself to himself to gain such a power.
Breath alteration. (altered state and opening of energy centres) hypersensativity and mind emptyness allows the higher self to communicate.
Extreme exercise repetition (breath empowerment and spirit raising) followed by lasitude.
Sence depravation( shutting off sence organs develops other sences) inner hearing, inner sight.
Food depravation ( body shuts down and soul complex activated) dream body shifts in to the inner world and soul world opens up to unseen phenomenon.
sacred plants ingested. (power plants open up physic centres) as the body dies so the soul connects to the inner worlds. Spiritual dream empowerment.
Warning Becarefull with this.

A pre ritual to protect your self with the ALGIZ RUNE CUT IN FIRE to the 4 compass points your personel valkeria flygia or skuld to be invoked. Call sing or chant her name.
You will need a drum or drumming tape to ride the sea of time the bifrost bridge. INCENSE TO CREATE THE RIGHT SPIRITUAL ENERGY.

Clear intent and a message with yes or no answers.

Relax and as you pass into unconsciousness let the images rise up into you consciousness.

For a good book to read RUNIC JOHN ON SHAMANISM
Its about nordic shamanism. Good luck.

Caledonian
Friday, June 3rd, 2011, 02:07 PM
"Magic is only a hidden knowledge of science that everybody else doesn't know about which only seems magical in giving off the illusion of sorcery." -Random quote.

Ocko
Friday, June 3rd, 2011, 02:16 PM
Necromancy is basically shamanism, and Oden has all the aspects and attributes of a shaman; for starters he rides a horse with eight legs/hoofs to the underworld. That is about as shamanistic as it gets.

So, necromancy and shamanism had a profound importance for our Heathen ancestors.

Interestingly, in Norse legend Seid (Norse shamanism) was always considered a female art, and it was also something that Oden, with the other Aesir, had learned from Freja, the great goddess. You should also note that shamanistic practices, when practised by males, have always had a transgendered aspect to them.

You might find Shamanism by Mircea Eliade interesting. Jenny Blain has written a seemingly promising book called Nine Worlds of Seid-Magic: Ecstasy and Neo-Shamanism in North European Paganism, but since it is on my to-read list I really cannot vouch for it.



seidr was not considered a female art in norse life. That is feminist hogwash.

When you read the Edda there are plenty of hints that it was different. Kings were supposed to know those art.

Stav with runes were found in the graves of male shamans, most likely used for divination.

The law speakers had to divine the will of the Gods and so on.

I think that erroneous statement is from Loki making fun of Odin because he accuses him to learn from Freya.

Freya, a Vanir, most likely worked with shamanism in female areas, like to seduce someone, becoming pregnant, I also guess she was responsible for the 'earth shamanism' meaning wheather and fertility of the land, which seem to have an inert connection to the feminine.

Druids and their germanic counterparts the Thrudes were trained in shamanism, but not that simply Hexemeister stuff you find today but on a much deeper level.

Necromancy starts with ancestor honoring (not worshipping). Usually a son would be named after his paternal grandfather because people thought that that would be some sort of reincarnation. (for girls that worked accordingly).

To be born into a Sippe/clan had way more meaning than it has today. Also the closeness of living in a big family setting creates a closer relationship between the members of family.

The old people, when not able to help anymore decided on killing themselves before the winter, they went into the woods. That freed their spirits from a wretched body.

there have been female and male 'shamans' in our ancient culture.

The last remnants of that were the witches. A witch circle had always a male as the headmaster.

Males were not transgender, that is a great distortion of what happened there. In order to do good shamanism one has to balance both sides. that means the males had to develope their nurturing side (in order to heal) also they developed the spiritsoul (intuition) which is today considered falsely as feminine. Women shaman had to develope their human soul (intellect) which is falsely considered as male today.

They were not transgender but whole. That is a different thing. Transgender people today feel more attracted to the goddess Hel as she represented two-conflicting elements. In contrast to shamans who also develope not only the 2 conflicting elements (spiritsoul and human soul) but also develope the uniting part the godsoul(manifesting as comscience)

Elessar
Friday, June 3rd, 2011, 05:26 PM
While we're on magic, here's some food for thought.

"To practice magic is to be a quack; to know magic is to be a sage." - Eliphas Lévi

"Magic is the divinity of man achieved in union with faith..." - Eliphas Lévi



Also there are other ways to learn about the gods of our people. like for example pre christian rune carvings and archaeological finds.


This is left to be incredibly arbitrary and ambiguous, basing spirituality on ancient idolatry. Archaeologists themselves can't agree on what most of it means. There's just so much we still don't know about what our ancestors believed, as we're left with only these mute objects. Whereas runestones just tell us quirky little anecdotes.

Take for instance Oseberg Buddha.
http://scandistyle.ru/wp-content/uploads/2010/05/Buddha-Oseberg-Myklebostad.jpg
Is this an indicator that the Vikings were in to remnants of their ancient Aryan Yogic faith, or did they think it just looked cool?

We are fairly certain that's Odin there riding on Sleipnir, perhaps being greeted by a Valkire, but what of the other symbols? And how could one use it in their practice of religion? Again, it's left to the eye of the beholder (no pun intended)
http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~islwgw/Scandinavia/runestoneSweden743.jpg

What I'm trying to get at is that a belief system as such is like going blindfolded out into the past, placing your foundation on very shaky surfaces, or perhaps non-existent surfaces.

Neophyte
Friday, June 3rd, 2011, 09:31 PM
What I'm trying to get at is that a belief system as such is like going blindfolded out into the past, placing your foundation on very shaky surfaces, or perhaps non-existent surfaces.

If those beliefs were based on supernatural experiences, those experiences can be repeated and the faith recreated.

Hersir
Tuesday, June 28th, 2011, 04:14 PM
While we're on magic, here's some food for thought.

"To practice magic is to be a quack; to know magic is to be a sage." - Eliphas Lévi

"Magic is the divinity of man achieved in union with faith..." - Eliphas Lévi



This is left to be incredibly arbitrary and ambiguous, basing spirituality on ancient idolatry. Archaeologists themselves can't agree on what most of it means. There's just so much we still don't know about what our ancestors believed, as we're left with only these mute objects. Whereas runestones just tell us quirky little anecdotes.

Take for instance Oseberg Buddha.
http://scandistyle.ru/wp-content/uploads/2010/05/Buddha-Oseberg-Myklebostad.jpg
Is this an indicator that the Vikings were in to remnants of their ancient Aryan Yogic faith, or did they think it just looked cool?

We are fairly certain that's Odin there riding on Sleipnir, perhaps being greeted by a Valkire, but what of the other symbols? And how could one use it in their practice of religion? Again, it's left to the eye of the beholder (no pun intended)


What I'm trying to get at is that a belief system as such is like going blindfolded out into the past, placing your foundation on very shaky surfaces, or perhaps non-existent surfaces.

This Oseberg buddha is not from the vikings, it's Irish. A large amount of metalwork from the British Isles has been found in 9th century Scandinavian graves.

Elessar
Tuesday, June 28th, 2011, 05:55 PM
This Oseberg buddha is not from the vikings, it's Irish. A large amount of metalwork from the British Isles has been found in 9th century Scandinavian graves.
That still doesn't account for why and what significance it had. Much of Anglo-saxon gems in their jewelry came from as far as Afghanistan, yet the style is distinctly Anglo-Saxon. Some posit that the cross-legged motif is a reflection of the stance of the Celtic God Cernunnos. So perhaps it was a representation of the Cernunnos-Pan-Shiva-Odin cult found across the entire of Eurasia from Ireland to Punjab.

There was also of course the fifth or sixth century A.D statuette of The Buddha found in Helgö, Sweden. Which was probably a souvenir rather than a votive statue, but who knows, maybe the Viking incorporated some kind of yogic practice into their religion :P

http://www.asianart.com/forum/takaki/dozen/swed1.gif
http://www.asianart.com/forum/takaki/dozen/swed2.gif
This also pretty much throws everything ultra-Germanic nationalists believe is acceptable to own or believe in out the window...

Ocko
Tuesday, June 28th, 2011, 09:45 PM
In a sense shamanism is entering the world of the Gods.

In cosmology we have Odin slaughtering the giant Ymir. Odin stands for consciousness and the Ymir stands for energy.

the energy part is unfree it is blind, powerful. It follows causation. there is no other way energy can take. the most dense form of energy is what we call matter.

Odin gave as a human soul, intellect to understand that part of the cosmos, not to worship it but to understand and control. Most men are stronger in that element than women. (more male students at physics, ingeneering and so on).

Odin created humans also with a spirit soul to understand and be connected to the Gods. (It is our purpose to continue the 'slaughtering' of Ymir, meaning to control matter and energy to shape it after divine principles) Our body is the finest example of that, consciousness controlling matter.

Consciousness does not have the laws of the energy part, it is free. For example one can be aware of stars and study them, that is non-location. As well one can be aware of the past that is timelessness. (memory for the past, vision for the future and senses for the present). Consciousness is also free in other areas but I don't want to go to deep into it.

Women are generally more living at the spirit soul (inuition, imagination, dreams, astral perception, emotions and so on). Their connection is closer to the world of the Gods, but they lack in the area what the Gods want from humans. (the reason why humans are created).

That is why they were more proficient or prevalent in divination. Because of their feminine nurturing elements they were/are also more inclined to heal. That is their shamanism focussed on certain aspects of shamanism.

A man has to develope his spiritsoul to get into a better connection to the Gods. A male shaman who does not do that, knows a lot about the world but is powerless.

A woman who does not develope her human soul, maybe a powerful shamaness but dumb.

That is why shamanism is initially easier for women but it becomes harder when they want to go beyond a certain stage. For men it is the opposite, their problems are in the beginning and they have it easier later.

Back to necromancy, yes one can get into contact with dead people. That is not really a problem. (most dead people do not want to come back to earth, it is hard on them and they can stand it only for a short time).

necromancy is a simple and basic thing to learn in shamanism.

Dead people are in a non-physical locality. With our spiritsoul we can find them easily as that soul as non-locality in itself.

Quantum physics faces a similar problem with the quantum leaps: An electron disappear from one ring and suddenly appears on another ring of the atom. There is no transition observable. In the state between the two rings that electron is in non-locality.

One can compare that as between two lifes. (the physical parts and the non-locality between lifes).

Wittmann
Wednesday, June 29th, 2011, 09:26 AM
Seidh was, amongst humans, restricted to women, but this need not mean that something akin cannot be practiced by men. It is of course true that women will have clear advantages, and that some of the qualities associated are typically feminine.

I recall a good post by Ocko once where he stated that whilst this intuitive retelling is feminine in nature, that a man needn't be ergi to be a practitioner of Seidh or another type of shamanism. You can read the post here (http://forums.skadi.net/showpost.php?p=993336&postcount=12), very insightful.

In either instance, being at a reasonably level of spiritual awareness helps. Actual Seidh can be technically practiced by a male (though he should adapt an own form) without going effeminate, but the lower the level of spiritual awareness, the higher the danger of developing effeminate traits. ;)

A book I found to be insightful (and certainly untainted by his otherwise New-Age predicament) into Seidh-work and other shamanic practices would be Seidways by Jan Fries; also since it allows for different levels of expertise to enjoy the techniques and insights gained.

If I might ask, how does one know how much spiritual awareness one possesses? I mean to say, how would one know that s/he would be good at magic/mysticism?

Ocko
Wednesday, June 29th, 2011, 07:21 PM
If I might ask, how does one know how much spiritual awareness one possesses? I mean to say, how would one know that s/he would be good at magic/mysticism?

It is a question of how good you are at obtaining and maintaining alpha wave consciousness. That is the state you are in when you do shamanism.

You can also buy yourself a book by Sandra Ingerman Shamanic journeying: A beginners guide. It comes complete with instructions and drumming CD. When you can do that you can most likely do much more.

Often you get some kind of calls, like accidents, strange experiences, often connected to nature. you see something unusual, an animal behaves strange and what not.

You will get an awareness of your surroundings and what happens there. Some really stand out and they have a meaning or message. It is up to you to see it and realize it. Follow what you think is asked of you (or don't, you never give up your freedom).

If you do the Sandra Ingerman thing you will get into contact with your poweranimal. I see mine often and they always have a meaning.

The general rule is that you also can go into nature and ask your poweranimal to contact you. Keep this in mind and think often when you are in nature, something might happen. Also ask it to appear 4 times so you are sure.

I did that with a friend (who wanted to know his poweranimal) on a road side and we saw 4 times ravens/crows. The first time one circled several times over us and called.

I studied ravens and it really had a very much similar behaviour as my friend.

Things depened whether you can keep up your intention and then your attention.

Wittmann
Thursday, June 30th, 2011, 09:06 AM
It is a question of how good you are at obtaining and maintaining alpha wave consciousness. That is the state you are in when you do shamanism.

You can also buy yourself a book by Sandra Ingerman Shamanic journeying: A beginners guide. It comes complete with instructions and drumming CD. When you can do that you can most likely do much more.

Often you get some kind of calls, like accidents, strange experiences, often connected to nature. you see something unusual, an animal behaves strange and what not.

You will get an awareness of your surroundings and what happens there. Some really stand out and they have a meaning or message. It is up to you to see it and realize it. Follow what you think is asked of you (or don't, you never give up your freedom).

If you do the Sandra Ingerman thing you will get into contact with your poweranimal. I see mine often and they always have a meaning.

The general rule is that you also can go into nature and ask your poweranimal to contact you. Keep this in mind and think often when you are in nature, something might happen. Also ask it to appear 4 times so you are sure.

I did that with a friend (who wanted to know his poweranimal) on a road side and we saw 4 times ravens/crows. The first time one circled several times over us and called.

I studied ravens and it really had a very much similar behaviour as my friend.

Things depened whether you can keep up your intention and then your attention.

Well I am not really sure about the concept of a spirit animal, I have never been truly fond of animals as the germs and such on them, I prefer not to touch them. Although I do have some "strange occourances" happen around me, such as lights flipping on and off, especially street lamps, I can walk under them, and they will turn off every so often. I also hear very well, such as being able to hear a quiet conversation from a room or two away sometimes. I'd say the most obvious thing would be more of an effect on people, I get told I have a "strong aura" and it dominates the energy around it. Something like when I am in a room, I exert the most "presence". I also seem to often get my way, and can easilly talk people into things and almost always seem to get people to instantly like me, such as being able to completely get different results from other people asking the same thing to someone. Like sor example I could walk up to a proffesor and ask "Can I take the test next week, I didn't get a chance to study" and I'll be told sure, then the person behind me asks and they get a lecture on laziness and get told they have to take it like everyone else... I also have nightmares a lot, if that makes a difference, but they're never "common" nightmares like old age, can't control the car, they are deeper things, like wandering between locations such as a store, then step five feet and be in suburban america, but never see a soul, and even when you see someone they seem more like an apparition. :|

Schopenhauer
Thursday, June 30th, 2011, 03:37 PM
That still doesn't account for why and what significance it had. Much of Anglo-saxon gems in their jewelry came from as far as Afghanistan, yet the style is distinctly Anglo-Saxon. Some posit that the cross-legged motif is a reflection of the stance of the Celtic God Cernunnos. So perhaps it was a representation of the Cernunnos-Pan-Shiva-Odin cult found across the entire of Eurasia from Ireland to Punjab.

There was also of course the fifth or sixth century A.D statuette of The Buddha found in Helgö, Sweden. Which was probably a souvenir rather than a votive statue, but who knows, maybe the Viking incorporated some kind of yogic practice into their religion :P

http://www.asianart.com/forum/takaki/dozen/swed1.gif
http://www.asianart.com/forum/takaki/dozen/swed2.gif
This also pretty much throws everything ultra-Germanic nationalists believe is acceptable to own or believe in out the window...

Slightly OT, but the answer to your question can be found by studying the path of conquests of the ancient Aryans.

As for the historical Buddha, he was a prince from an Aryan family. What was later to become Buddhism was the traditional teachings of the Aryan warrior class. See Evola's Doctrine Of Awakening for details.

Schopenhauer
Thursday, June 30th, 2011, 03:48 PM
Don Webb Interviews Edred Thorsson
http://www.chaosmatrix.org/library/chaos/texts/edred.html

Radulfr
Sunday, July 31st, 2011, 11:00 AM
Necromancy in the Nordic Tradition doesn't necessarily have to go through Oden. One can also turn to the giantess Hel since she is related to the dead, burial grounds, crossroads, etc. Oden is not as all-knowing as most people think, although he is depicted as such.

Alice
Friday, February 1st, 2019, 06:07 PM
I want to know the opinions of the people here on Skadi.
What are your views on Necromancy? Is it good or bad in your eyes?

Consulting the dead to discern the future? Um, absolutely terrifying and not good in any way, thank you very much. :uhoh Necromancy is explicitly condemned by the Catholic Church (Catechism, nos. 2115-17).

schwab
Friday, February 1st, 2019, 06:35 PM
"I want to know the opinions of the people here on Skadi.
What are your views on Necromancy? Is it good or bad in your eyes?"


It is not only condemned by the Catholic church but by the Biblical Scriptures.
Deut:18:10,11.

The Scriptures also condemns other practices like astrology, charmers, consulters, diviners, enchanters, false prophets, magicians, necromancers, soothsayers, sorceres, witches, wizards.
All these practices have something to do with demonic spirits.

The Mercian
Friday, February 1st, 2019, 06:55 PM
Necromancy in the Nordic Tradition doesn't necessarily have to go through Oden. One can also turn to the giantess Hel since she is related to the dead, burial grounds, crossroads, etc. Oden is not as all-knowing as most people think, although he is depicted as such.
Depicted as such by Christian writers of course. They had to make it more palatable for the Christian audience after all, so Odin needed to be "God," Balder needed to look like Jesus and Loki needed to resemble the Devil.

Those in Heathen circles that I've spoken to that are into the more Shamanic side usually invoke Hel over Odin despite Odin's portrayal in the Voluspa. After that I cannot comment as its not something I've looked into.

Rodulf
Friday, February 1st, 2019, 07:02 PM
I believe modern people have been conditioned to fear their Elder Kin. Just look at our horror movies...vampires, zombies, etc. The departed ancestors used to be revered and honored.