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Northern Paladin
Sunday, May 8th, 2011, 12:16 AM
If you are learning German, and you would like to have something like a phrase or a few sentences translated into German, if you'd like to have something corrected, or if you have a general question about German grammar, post it here. Please be respectful and don't ask to have an entire book translated or corrected :D

I'm learning German, and I need your help. There aren't very many German-speakers where I live, which that makes the learning process very hard. I hope some German-speaking members can help. I decided to make this thread so that everybody on Skadi can benefit. I am going to write down random sentences I say everyday, in a notebook, and try my best to translate them into German, and then post the ones I think are interesting. I think this is the best way to learn the language without actually being in the country.

By the way, how accurate is "Google translate"? I decided to put the first three sentences of my second paragraph into the translator and it gave me this:

Ich lerne Deutsch, und ich brauche Ihre Hilfe. Es gibt nicht sehr viele Deutsch-Lautsprecher, wo ich wohne, was bedeutet, dass der Lernprozess sehr schwer macht. Ich hoffe, einige deutschsprachige Mitglieder helfen können.

SaxonPagan
Sunday, May 8th, 2011, 12:27 AM
This is a great idea, FK :)

I am in the position of being both a German speaker AND learner so I can probably help folks like yourself out with the easier stuff whilst asking the odd question myself from time to time.

As for the Google translator, well it conveys the general message but it sometimes comes unstuck with words having multiple meanings. For example, if we take Deutsch-Lautsprecher, this actually means a German loudspeaker whereas German speakers in the sense that you intended would be Deutschsprechende or Deutschsprachige (as it correctly put on the last line).

There are also some minor issues with grammar but overall it's a very useful resource. BTW, have you tried out the translator function here on Skadi yet?

Sigurd
Sunday, May 8th, 2011, 06:00 PM
By the way, how accurate is "Google translate"? I decided to put the first three sentences of my second paragraph into the translator and it gave me this:

Not very. It is a useful tool if you know the basic syntax and basic vocabulary, and grammatic rules and are just looking for the right words and/or prepositions. For the translation of entire texts it's relatively useless, at best to understand the basic meaning of a foreign-language article, but not to learn the language in any form of correctness --- Google Translate has been improving a lot over the years but it's nowhere near the ideal. ;)



Ich lerne Deutsch, und ich brauche Ihre Hilfe. Es gibt nicht sehr viele Deutsch-Lautsprecher, wo ich wohne, was bedeutet, dass der Lernprozess sehr schwer macht. Ich hoffe, einige deutschsprachige Mitglieder helfen können.

Stupid thing. "Lautsprecher" are the speakers that go into your stereo. :doh:

Correct would be (close to your original):

Ich lerne deutsch, und (ich) brauche Ihre Hilfe. Es gibt nicht sehr viele Sprecher des Deutschen [or: Deutschsprachige] wo ich wohne, was bedeutet, daß der Lernprozeß sehr schwierig ist. Ich hoffe, daß mir einige deutschsprachige Mitglieder helfen können.


How I would have formulated it would be:

Ich lerne deutsch und bräuchte Ihre Hilfe ["would need your help"]. Wo ich wohne, gibt es nicht besonders viele Sprecher des Deutschen [or: Deutschsprachige] ["not particularly many speakers of German"], was bedeutet, daß sich der Lernprozeß als recht schwierig gestaltet ["which means, the learning process is 'difficult design' (literal translation :P)"]. Ich hoffe, daß mir einige deutschsprachige Mitglieder helfen können.

Don't worry about the ß/ss thing for now where it differs, I use, like most members on here, "old orthography". I personally think the new rules made the whole thing more confusing than it used to be, but essentially, neither is wrong. ;)

filip
Monday, May 9th, 2011, 02:52 PM
[I]Ich lerne deutsch und bräuchte Ihre Hilfe...
Hello,
Could you explain why did you put the Umlaut in "bräuche"?
I thought that in Konjunktiv 2 the Umlaut is only added to irregular verbs, for example: "wäre", "spräche", "sähe" etc.

Ingvaeonic
Monday, May 9th, 2011, 03:05 PM
Excellent idea for a thread, FK. This could prove very useful.

Schopenhauer
Monday, May 9th, 2011, 05:31 PM
The title of the Der Blutharsch album, "Der Sieg Des Lichtes Ist Des Lebens Heil", what exactly does this mean? I've tried translating it myself, but I don't think the results I've gotten so far really match or adequately convey what this phrase really means.

If anyone would care to elaborate.

Heinrich Harrer
Monday, May 9th, 2011, 05:50 PM
The title of the Der Blutharsch album, "Der Sieg Des Lichtes Ist Des Lebens Heil", what exactly does this mean? I've tried translating it myself, but I don't think the results I've gotten so far really match or adequately convey what this phrase really means.

If anyone would care to elaborate.

"Der Sieg des Lichtes ist des Lebens Heil"

I think it comes down to something like:
"The victory of light is the salvation of life."

Schopenhauer
Monday, May 9th, 2011, 05:55 PM
"Der Sieg des Lichtes ist des Lebens Heil"

I think it comes down to something like:
"The victory of light is the salvation of life."

Thank you for the translation.

I was wondering though if the phrase has any historical significance.

Heinrich Harrer
Monday, May 9th, 2011, 06:24 PM
I was wondering though if the phrase has any historical significance.

Maybe, but none that I'm aware of. If it has some historical significance, maybe other members know something about it.

Schafkopf
Tuesday, May 10th, 2011, 02:39 PM
Hello,
Could you explain why did you put the Umlaut in "bräuche"?
I thought that in Konjunktiv 2 the Umlaut is only added to irregular verbs, for example: "wäre", "spräche", "sähe" etc.

He has written "bräuchte" not "bräucht", "bräucht" do not exist.
"bräuchte" is Konjuktiv (polite form) from "brauchen"

FearingAfrica
Tuesday, May 10th, 2011, 06:47 PM
What does "gerade aus" mean? thank you.

SaxonPagan
Tuesday, May 10th, 2011, 06:53 PM
Straight on --->

Northern Paladin
Thursday, May 12th, 2011, 07:03 AM
I'm having trouble pronouncing words that have "st" in them. When is "st" pronounced as "sht"? I can't figure this out.

I used to think words like stadt, fenster, vorstellung, stellen were pronounced as shtat, fenshter, fourshtellung, shtellen respectively. Now I know it's not right, and I'm confused.

Heinrich Harrer
Thursday, May 12th, 2011, 01:34 PM
I'm having trouble pronouncing words that have "st" in them. When is "st" pronounced as "sht"? I can't figure this out.

I used to think words like stadt, fenster, vorstellung, stellen were pronounced as shtat, fenshter, fourshtellung, shtellen respectively. Now I know it's not right, and I'm confused.

Haven't thought about that yet myself. I'll try to think of some examples.

Words with 'st' and pronunciation 'st':


Fenster, Monster, Muster, Musterung, pusten, husten, fasten, rasten, Mast


Words with 'st' and pronunciation 'scht':


Stein, stellen, stehlen, Vorstellung, Staub, stumm, Straße, Steuer, steuern, Maßstab


It looks like when 'st' is at the beginning, it is pronounced like 'scht', while it is just pronounced as 'st' inside the word.

The only exceptions here seem to be "Vorstellung" and "Maßstab".
But "Vorstellung" is derived from: vor + Stellung -> Vorstellung,
and "Maßstab" is a compound word too: Maß + Stab -> Maßstab.
And in both "Stellung" and "Stab" 'st' is at the beginning of the word again, explaining the 'scht' pronunciation.

So it seems if the 'st' is at the beginning, it will be pronounced as 'scht', and if it's in the middle of the word, it will be pronounced as 'st'. You just have to look out for compound words, and think of the components individually.

Of course local dialects might confuse you even further. In northern dialects, for example in Hamburg, they pronounce the 'st' in certain words like "Stein" just as 'st', while in southern dialects, for example in Baden-Württemberg, they would pronounce "Fenster" as "Fenshter" - both contrary to standard german.

Ocko
Thursday, May 12th, 2011, 02:16 PM
The 'r' is also disappearing. People don't say warm anymore but something like waahm.

Amerikanerin
Monday, May 16th, 2011, 12:05 AM
For now I have a question of a more theoretical nature. Maybe Sigurd or someone as well-versed in linguistics can answer. Every noun in German has a gender. "Die Sonne" is feminine but "der Mond" and "der Stern" are masculine. "Der See" is a lake and "die See" is a sea. How and why did all this gender system came into being? Where is the logic behind it (if there is one)?

Schafkopf
Monday, May 16th, 2011, 02:00 PM
For now I have a question of a more theoretical nature. Maybe Sigurd or someone as well-versed in linguistics can answer. Every noun in German has a gender. "Die Sonne" is feminine but "der Mond" and "der Stern" are masculine. "Der See" is a lake and "die See" is a sea. How and why did all this gender system came into being? Where is the logic behind it (if there is one)?

That`s a good question! Unfortunately there is no logic behind this "gender system". Even native speakers have problems to categorize it for some words.


"die See" is a sea.

"die See" or "das Meer" is a sea :D

I think for a non native speakers who are learning German it could be frustrating.

Note: There are some trends, look here. (http://deutsch.lingo4u.de/grammatik/nomen/genus)

Heinrich Harrer
Monday, May 16th, 2011, 03:31 PM
I don't know much about it myself, I can only try to summarize what I found online.

Looks like in early indo-european languages objects were first categorized into two categories - whether they were inanimate or animate. The animate category then later split off into a male and female subcategory, resulting in the three genders still in use in many languages (while some dropped the neuter gender or the system entirely):

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grammatical_gender

Research indicates that the earliest stages of Proto-Indo-European had two genders, animate and inanimate, as did Hittite, but the animate gender (which, in contrast to the inanimate gender, has an independent accusative form) later split into masculine and feminine, originating the classical three-way classification into masculine, feminine, and neuter which most of its descendants inherited. Many Indo-European languages kept these three genders. Such is the case with most Slavic languages, classical Latin, Sanskrit, Greek, and German, for instance. Other Indo-European languages reduced the number of genders to two, either by losing the neuter (like Urdu/Hindi, most Romance languages and the Celtic languages), or by having the feminine and the masculine merge with one another into a common gender (as has happened, or is in the process of happening, to several Germanic languages). Some, like English and Afrikaans, have nearly completely lost grammatical gender, while Persian has completely lost it. On the other hand, a few Slavic languages have arguably added new genders to the classical three. In those ancient and modern Indo-European languages that preserve a system of noun declension (including Latin, Greek, Sanskrit, Slavic, and some Germanic languages), there is a high but not absolute correlation between grammatical gender and declensional class. Many linguists also believe this to be true of the middle and late stages of Proto-Indo-European.


It seems they were then used to classify/group nouns according to certain criteria (which probably few people are actually aware of), but which also eroded away over time in some languages, making it look more arbitrary:


There are three main ways by which natural languages categorize nouns into genders:

- according to logical or symbolic similarities in their meaning (semantic),
- by grouping them with other nouns that have similar form (morphological),
- or through an arbitrary convention (lexical, possibly rooted in the language's history).

Usually, a combination of the three types of criteria is used, though one is more prevalent. (...)

Example - Morphological Categorization:
In German also, diminutives with the endings -chen and -lein (cognates of English -kin and -ling, meaning "little, young") are always neuter, which is why Mädchen "girl" and Fräulein "young woman" are neuter. Another ending, the nominalizing suffix -ling, can be used to make countable nouns from uncountable nouns (Teig "dough" → Teigling "piece of dough"), or personal nouns from abstract nouns (Lehre "teaching", Strafe "punishment" → Lehrling "apprentice", Sträfling "convict") or adjectives (feige "cowardly" → Feigling "coward"), always producing masculine nouns.

Example - Lexical Categorization:
In some languages, gender markers have been so eroded by time that they are no longer recognizable, even to native speakers (this is generally known as deflexion). Most German nouns give no morphological or semantic clue as to their gender. It must simply be memorized. The conventional aspect of grammatical gender is also clear when one considers that there is nothing objective about a table which makes it feminine, as French table, masculine as German Tisch, or neuter, as Norwegian bord.

The learner of such languages should regard gender as an integral part of each noun. A frequent recommendation is to memorize a modifier along with the noun as a unit, usually a definite article, e.g. memorizing la table — where la is the French feminine singular definite article — der Tisch — where der is the German masculine singular nominative definite article — and bordet — where the suffix -et indicates the definite neuter singular in Norwegian.

In French the noun's ending often indicates gender. Certain suffixes are quite reliable indicators, e.g. the suffix -age when added to a verb, (e.g. garer ("to park") -> garage; nettoyer ("to clean") -> nettoyage ("cleaning")) indicates a masculine noun, although when -age is part of the root of the word, it can be feminine, as in plage ("beach") or image). This is the case for noun's ending in "-tion" "-sion" and -aison which are all feminine.

Whether a distant ancestor of French, German, Norwegian, and English had a semantic value for genders is of course a different matter. Some authors have speculated that archaic Proto-Indo-European had two noun classes with the semantic values of animate and inanimate.
(using the ending '-heit'/'-keit' seems to be similar, just that all produced nouns are female: schön - die Schönheit, gesamt - die Gesamtheit, offen - die Offenheit, schnell - die Schnelligkeit, heiter - die Heiterkeit, möglich - die Möglichkeit, erlernbar - die Erlernbarkeit, etc.)

As for some useful roles the grammatical gender might fulfill:

Ibrihim:p.27-28 identified three possible useful roles of grammatical gender: (1) In a language with explicit inflections for gender, it is easy to express the natural gender of animate beings. (2) Grammatical gender "can be a valuable tool of disambiguation", rendering clarity about antecedents. (3) In literature, gender can be used to "animate and personify inanimate nouns."

The second point looks similar to me like the advantages of Großschreibung, simply adding some additional information to make the comprehension easier. When using a pronoun to refer to something previously mentioned, the gender might make it clearer to what object one is referring to (as objects with other genders can immediately be ruled out). At least that's how I would interpret it.

Maybe some of the aspects of categorizing nouns also have certain benefits. Even though it's mostly subconscious (at least with our mother tongues), language and how we perceive/think about the world seems to be tightly interwoven. Or maybe it's just the analytical nature of our brain which likes patterns and classifying things into categories that resulted in these categorizations once we had several genders available in our language (using them to group words of similar patterns together, and sort of abusing the male/female gender for such purposes, though inanimate objects clearly have no biological gender, decoupling the concept of grammatical gender from biological gender).

dark mind
Tuesday, May 17th, 2011, 04:11 PM
I'm having trouble pronouncing words that have "st" in them. When is "st" pronounced as "sht"? I can't figure this out.

I used to think words like stadt, fenster, vorstellung, stellen were pronounced as shtat, fenshter, fourshtellung, shtellen respectively. Now I know it's not right, and I'm confused.

southern Germans like me pronounce the 'st' like the 'sh' in shower e.g., like "fenshter" as you typed it, actually it should be pronounced similarly like the 'st' in "stone" for example, however to a southern German it would sound very strange if it would be pronounced that way.

Hesse
Tuesday, May 24th, 2011, 09:05 PM
I recieved a family photo by email from someone I know in Germany who does genealogy for decendents of a certain family that formerly lived in Westfalia. This person also provided a electronically written description of physical characteristics on of the relative, and the individual was described as having "Tiefe Geheimratsecken".

I put it through a translation engine, and all I got was "deep secret advice corners", but this doesnt make much sense. Any thoughts?

Juthunge
Tuesday, May 24th, 2011, 09:08 PM
I recieved a family photo by email from someone I know in Germany who does genealogy for decendents of a certain family that formerly lived in Westfalia. This person also provided a electronically written description of physical characteristics on of the relative, and the individual was described as having "Tiefe Geheimratsecken".

I put it through a translation engine, and all I got was "deep secret advice corners", but this doesnt make much sense. Any thoughts?

Properly translated it would mean something along the lines of "pronounced receding hairline". Like this most likely:

http://assets.gearlive.com/celebrities/blogimages/JudeLaw_bald.jpg

Heinrich Harrer
Tuesday, May 24th, 2011, 09:26 PM
I recieved a family photo by email from someone I know in Germany who does genealogy for decendents of a certain family that formerly lived in Westfalia. This person also provided a electronically written description of physical characteristics on of the relative, and the individual was described as having "Tiefe Geheimratsecken".

I put it through a translation engine, and all I got was "deep secret advice corners", but this doesnt make much sense. Any thoughts?

"Geheimratsecken" is a colloquialism referring to the receding hairline specifically around the two temples, where the hair of men usually starts to recede first.

"Geheimratsecke" = Geheimrat + Ecke (corner/angle)

As for the origins of the colloquialism: 'Geheimrat' was a title in the Holy Roman Empire of German nation, and most title bearers probably were of more advanced age sporting such receding hairlines.

http://i.i.imgur.com/HxVp8.jpg/

Hesse
Tuesday, May 24th, 2011, 10:27 PM
The 'r' is also disappearing. People don't say warm anymore but something like waahm.

Wouldn't it be more like vaahm?

Schafkopf
Tuesday, May 24th, 2011, 10:56 PM
Wouldn't it be more like vaahm?

No, waahm is (more) correct.

"vaahm" would sound like "farm" in English, that isnt the correct pronouncing for "warm"

Hesse
Tuesday, May 24th, 2011, 11:06 PM
No, waahm is (more) correct.

"vaahm" would sound like "farm" in English, that isnt the correct pronouncing for "warm"


What I meant is that warm would soulndlike "vaahm" when pronounced, but for the actual spelling it would have the 'w'.

If warm was actually spelled 'varm' , then it would soulnd like farm.

Northern Paladin
Monday, June 13th, 2011, 02:26 PM
How do you say:

"It was very hot for an entire week, and now it's so cold that it feels like late April"

also:

"where is the ___ located"

referring to a certain item at a store, or a certain lofcation.

Thanks,.

Hesse
Monday, June 13th, 2011, 02:35 PM
How do you say:

"It was very hot for an entire week, and now it's so cold that it feels like late April"


Es war sehr heiss für die ganze Woche, und jetzt so kalt das Wetter ist, es fühlt wie Spaet April

But I'd wait for someone more knowledgable in German, maybe they can correct me on this. :P



"where is the ___ located"

referring to a certain item at a store, or a certain lofcation.

Wo liegt die/der/das_____?

Juthunge
Monday, June 13th, 2011, 02:36 PM
"It was very hot for an entire week, and now it's so cold that it feels like late April"


"Es war die gesamte Woche über sehr heiß und jetzt ist es so kalt, dass man meinen könnte es sei später April."

Or more literally:

"Es war eine ganze Woche lang sehr heiß und jetzt ist es so kalt, dass es sich anfühlt als sei es später April."

The former is definitely preferable to the latter in my opinion.




"where is the ___ located"

referring to a certain item at a store, or a certain lofcation.


"Wo kann ich (article) __ finden?"

"Wo finde ich (article) __ ?"

Or more simply put:

"Wo ist/sind der/die/das __ ?"

Hesse
Saturday, June 18th, 2011, 07:22 PM
So, I know there's the following spatial words, at least I think these are correct:

On the_____ Auf dem (am),der,den_______

Over the ______ uber dem,der,den___

Under the_______ unter dem, der, den______

in the_______ in dem (im), der, den________

Through the_____ durch dem, der, den_______

near the______ bei dem (beim), der, den_____

Habe ich recht?


But I forgot, how do you say:

around the____ ?

in front of_____ ?

behind the _____ ?

to the left of____?

to the right of ______?

Danke

Heinrich Harrer
Saturday, June 18th, 2011, 07:42 PM
So, I know there's the following spatial words, at least I think these are correct:

On the_____ Auf dem (am),der,den_______

Habe ich recht?

'am' is short for 'an dem' and not for 'auf dem'.



But I forgot, how do you say:

around the____ ?

in front of_____ ?

behind the _____ ?

to the left of____?

to the right of ______?

Danke

around the - in der Nähe von (~near something/approximately at), rund um ... / um ... herum (~all around)
in front of - vor (dem/der)
behind the - hinter (dem/der)
to the left of - links von
to the right of - rechts von

Hesse
Saturday, June 18th, 2011, 08:14 PM
'am' is short for 'an dem' and not for 'auf dem'.



around the - in der Nähe von (~near something/approximately at), rund um ... / um ... herum (~all around)
in front of - vor (dem/der)
behind the - hinter (dem/der)
to the left of - links von
to the right of - rechts von

So then would one be correct in saying:


Ich fahre rund Berlin (I drive around Berlin)

Es gibt Germanischen um der Welt herum (There are Germanics all around the world)

Die Katze ist hinter dem Stühl (the cat is behind the chair)

Heinrich Harrer
Saturday, June 18th, 2011, 08:30 PM
Die Katze ist hinter dem Stühl (the cat is behind the chair)

"Stuhl" not "Stühl", but otherwise this is correct, yes.


So then would one be correct in saying:

Ich fahre rund Berlin (I drive around Berlin)

Es gibt Germanischen um der Welt herum (There are Germanics all around the world)

No, these two phrases are not really correct.
("Many flowers are growing around the tree." ~ Viele Blumen wachsen rund um den Baum.

"There are many pubs around the soccer stadium." ~ Es gibt viele Kneipen in der Nähe vom Fußballstadion.)

But:
I drive around Berlin. - Ich fahre in Berlin herum. / Ich fahre in Berlin umher.

There are Germanics all around the world. - Perhaps: Es gibt Germanen rundherum auf der welt.

Hesse
Thursday, August 11th, 2011, 01:56 AM
1. What is the correct verb in German for "to finish", as in the act of finishing/completing something (i.e yesterday I finished copying a book)? If my memory serves me right it's "Geschaft" but I would like to verify.

Also how would one say something is "done" or "finished" (meine Hausaufgaben ist ______)?



2. What is the correct verb in German for "to copy"? I have been using gekopien, gekopiet as I write/email to someone I have been personally communicating with in Germany in the past but I want to do it right and use a real word this time. :P

Mööv
Thursday, August 11th, 2011, 02:31 AM
2. What is the correct verb in German for "to copy"? I have been using gekopien, gekopiet as I write/email to someone I have been personally communicating with in Germany in the past but I want to do it right and use a real word this time. :P


kopieren

Gardisten
Thursday, August 11th, 2011, 03:03 AM
fertig


Also how would one say something is "done" or "finished" (meine Hausaufgaben ist ______)?

depends on the situation... kopieren, abschreiben, nachmachen, abkucken


2. What is the correct verb in German for "to copy"? I have been using gekopien, gekopiet as I write/email to someone I have been personally communicating with in Germany in the past but I want to do it right and use a real word this time. :P

Thusnelda
Thursday, August 11th, 2011, 04:54 PM
1. What is the correct verb in German for "to finish", as in the act of finishing/completing something (i.e yesterday I finished copying a book)? If my memory serves me right it's "Geschaft" but I would like to verify.
The most proper words would be "fertigstellen", "abschließen" or "beenden". :) "Geschafft!" wouldn´t fit, but you can use it if you want to say something like "Done, finally!". It´s an exclamation.

Also how would one say something is "done" or "finished" (meine Hausaufgaben ist ______)?
"Fertig". "Meine Hausaufgaben sind fertig!".


2. What is the correct verb in German for "to copy"? I have been using gekopien, gekopiet as I write/email to someone I have been personally communicating with in Germany in the past but I want to do it right and use a real word this time. :P
The best word is "vervielfältigen". "I want to copy these papers!" = "Ich möchte diese Blätter vervielfältigen!". You could also use "kopieren" but the word is of Latin origin. "Gekopien" or "gekopiet" are entirely wrong spelling errors. ;)

velvet
Thursday, August 11th, 2011, 05:14 PM
abkucken

Wusste gar nicht, dass du auch deutsch sprichst :)

Das da ist aber falsch geschrieben, es heisst abgucken, auch wenn es gesprochen mehr ein k als ein g ist.

Frag mich aber nicht warum das mit g geschrieben wird, weiss ich auch nicht :D

Hesse
Friday, August 12th, 2011, 07:49 PM
The most proper words would be "fertigstellen", "abschließen" or "beenden". :)

So one could say "Heute fertigstelle ich meine Hausaufgaben?

Is there a difference between the three and which instances they would be used?

Northern Paladin
Friday, August 12th, 2011, 08:08 PM
I had a cross-country team reunion yesterday, here are some of the things I said:

1) It's good to see you!

2) Did you graduate from college recently? (I graduated from college in ____ )

3) How's life these days? (How are you doing these days?)

4) Do you recognize anyone else in the crowd?

5) I rode my bike 20 miles today. (also, please give me the present tense of ''I ride'')

6) I haven't ran a mile since 2008.

7) I'm surprised I was able to run that far.

8) I ride my bike everyday. (almost everyday)

9) I ride more than 20 miles only once or twice a week.

10) Have you guys seen Donnie lately?

11) I run into him every so often.

12) It was great seeing you coach, good luck this season!

Mööv
Friday, August 12th, 2011, 08:11 PM
So one could say "Heute fertigstelle ich meine Hausaufgaben?




No you can´t put it that way. Fertigstellen would go as "fertig gestellt" in the back of the sentence. You´d also have to use "haben" in place of where you put fertigstelle. Not 100% sure, but I think it´s that way. My German got a bit rusty.

Hesse
Friday, August 12th, 2011, 08:19 PM
You´d also have to use "haben" in place of where you put fertigstelle


That would be true if the sentence were written in the past tense. But I'm talking about how it would be said in the present tense (i.e I am finishing my homework today) as the example I posted earlier "Heute fertigstelle ich meine Hausaufgaben?" deals with the present.

velvet
Friday, August 12th, 2011, 08:43 PM
That would be true if the sentence were written in the past tense. But I'm talking about how it would be said in the present tense (i.e I am finishing my homework today) as the example I posted earlier "Heute fertigstelle ich meine Hausaufgaben?" deals with the present.

Ui, that one touches upon the more complex subtleties of the German language. :)

Correct it is:
Heute stelle ich meine Hausaufgaben fertig.

There are quite some of these compound verbs, that though are seperated depending on the tense and context.

Ich stelle fertig (present, doing right now)
Ich werde fertigstellen (future or expression of intention to do so)
Ich habe fertiggestellt (past)


You could also say:
Heute werde ich meine Hausaufgaben fertig machen (/ beenden / erledigen)

Gardisten
Friday, August 12th, 2011, 08:56 PM
Both of my parents are German. I was usually spoken to in German, and would reply in English. I would say that my spoken and written German is not that good, but I can understand it fairly good, and I'm proud to say that I can read German quite well now.


Wusste gar nicht, dass du auch deutsch sprichst :)

Das da ist aber falsch geschrieben, es heisst abgucken, auch wenn es gesprochen mehr ein k als ein g ist.

Frag mich aber nicht warum das mit g geschrieben wird, weiss ich auch nicht :D

Heinrich Harrer
Friday, August 12th, 2011, 08:59 PM
I want to mention the simple past too, though many people today seem to use the present perfect almost exclusively for the past tense (at least in spoken language and in casual texts):

Ich stellte fertig. (simple past / Vergangenheit)
Ich habe fertiggestellt. (present perfect / Vollendete Gegenwart)

And in a relative clause the verb is together again even in the present tense:
"Du hast doch gesagt, daß du heute deine Hausaufgaben fertigstellst." (present tense, relative clause)

Neophyte
Friday, August 12th, 2011, 09:11 PM
My grammar is a bit off these days, but isn't the simple past used to convey that you used to do somthing regularly in the past? Whereas the present perfect refers to a single incident in the past?

E.g. Gestern habe ich ein Buch gelesen. / Früher las ich viel.

Hesse
Friday, August 12th, 2011, 09:30 PM
I had a cross-country team reunion yesterday, here are some of the things I said:

1) It's good to see you!

2) Did you graduate from college recently? (I graduated from college in ____ )

3) How's life these days? (How are you doing these days?)

4) Do you recognize anyone else in the crowd?

5) I rode my bike 20 miles today. (also, please give me the present tense of ''I ride'')

6) I haven't ran a mile since 2008.

7) I'm surprised I was able to run that far.

8) I ride my bike everyday. (almost everyday)

9) I ride more than 20 miles only once or twice a week.

10) Have you guys seen Donnie lately?

11) I run into him every so often.

12) It was great seeing you coach, good luck this season!

I'm not 100% certain for I'm a bit rusty in German knowledge, but I have an educated guess of translations on a few. There could be better translations though.

6) Ich habe keine Meilen gelauft seit 2008

8) Jedentag fahre ich mit meinem Fahrrad

9)Ich fahre mehr als 20 Meilen mit meinem Fahrrad nur einmal oder zweimal in der Woche

Not sure about the others.

SaxonPagan
Friday, August 12th, 2011, 09:36 PM
By Neophyte: isn't the simple past used to convey that you used to do somthing regularly in the past? Whereas the present perfect refers to a single incident in the past?

E.g. Gestern habe ich ein Buch gelesen. / Früher las ich viel.

Yes in theory (and definitely correct!) but, based on what Heinrich tells us, folks would now be just as inclined to say "früher habe ich viel gelesen".

SaxonPagan
Friday, August 12th, 2011, 09:50 PM
Norbert, I'm a bit pushed for time but here's a quick tip:

Don't translate literally and always seek to SIMPLIFY whenever possible.

Let's take #11 as an example ...


I run into him every so often.

Okay, so you don't actually run into him, do you? ;) What you in fact do is meet him, right?

So, I assume you know the verb "to meet", and this gives something like ...


Ich treffe ihn ab und zu.

I hope that helps a bit, not just with this particular translation but as an overall strategy.

Untersberger
Friday, August 12th, 2011, 11:59 PM
I would like to ask Clarification of the use of the German word 'Einsatz'..

What is the most used meaning of the word when used in everyday German?

It has differing meanings but what way should it be spoken or written the most?

Thusnelda
Saturday, August 13th, 2011, 01:49 AM
I had a cross-country team reunion yesterday, here are some of the things I said:

1) It's good to see you!
Es freut mich dich zu sehen!


2) Did you graduate from college recently? (I graduated from college in ____ )
Hast du kürzlich deinen (Fach)hochschulabschluß erreicht? (Ich habe mein Studium im <month> beendet.)


3) How's life these days? (How are you doing these days?)
Wie gehts dir zur Zeit? (Wie läufts bei dir?)


4) Do you recognize anyone else in the crowd?
Erkennst du noch jemand anderen in der (Menschen)menge?


5) I rode my bike 20 miles today. (also, please give me the present tense of ''I ride'')
Ich bin heute 20 Meilen Rad gefahren. ("Ich fahre")


6) I haven't ran a mile since 2008.
Ich bin seit 2008 keine Meile mehr gelaufen.


7) I'm surprised I was able to run that far.
Ich bin überrascht daß ich überhaupt so weit laufen konnte.


8) I ride my bike everyday. (almost everyday)
Ich fahre jeden Tag Fahrrad. (Fast jeden Tag)


9) I ride more than 20 miles only once or twice a week.
Ich radle nur ein- oder zweimal in der Woche mehr als 20 Meilen.


10) Have you guys seen Donnie lately?
Habt ihr kürzlich Donny gesehen?


11) I run into him every so often.
Ich treffe ihn sehr oft an.


12) It was great seeing you coach, good luck this season!
Es hat mich gefreut dich (mal wieder) gesehen zu haben, Trainer. Viel Glück diese Saison!



I would like to ask Clarification of the use of the German word 'Einsatz'..

What is the most used meaning of the word when used in everyday German?

There´re different meanings of "Einsatz" and it depends on the context, but the most used context is in a police-like, military or humanity sense. For example: Polizeieinsatz, Bundeswehreinsatz, Hilfseinsatz.

Other possible contexts for the word "Einsatz" are: Hingabe (dedication), Anstrengung (effort), Wetteinsatz (stake), Beschäftigung (employment (of workers)), eingelassenes Stück (inserted part, f.e. "Bohrmaschineneinsatz" = drill module), etc. ;)

Heinrich Harrer
Saturday, August 13th, 2011, 02:05 AM
My grammar is a bit off these days, but isn't the simple past used to convey that you used to do somthing regularly in the past? Whereas the present perfect refers to a single incident in the past?

E.g. Gestern habe ich ein Buch gelesen. / Früher las ich viel.

The main difference is this:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Preterite

The Präteritum was the standard, most neutral form for past actions, and could also express an event in the remote past, contrasting with the Perfekt which expressed an event that has consequences reaching into the present.

- Präteritum: Es regnete. "It rained. / It was raining." (I am talking about a past event.)
- Perfekt: Es hat geregnet. "It has rained." (The street is still wet.)


But as I mentioned the "present perfect" seems to be slowly replacing the "simple past" entirely in normal spoken language.


In modern German, however, these tenses are used very differently. The Präteritum now has the meaning of a narrative tense, i.e. a tense used primarily for describing connected past actions (e.g. as part of a story), and is used almost solely in formal writing. Use in speech is regarded as snobbish and thus very uncommon.

According to wikipedia there also seems to be some regional variation of its usage with the simple past having almost entirely vanished in southern germany.

Furthermore, in spoken Upper German (in South Germany, Austria and Switzerland), the Präteritum has vanished entirely except for the verb sein (to be) and wollen (to want), if not re-borrowed from Standard German (irregular forms only), but is still productive in producing the subjunctive.

Neophyte
Saturday, August 13th, 2011, 05:08 PM
I have a theory about that: foreigners speaking German in Germany. To a non-native German speaker like me conjugation of irregular verbs is a little tricky. Ich fuhr is harder to construct in real time than ich bin gefahren. In the latter case you just have to remember the participle. So, a foreigner speaking German would naturally gravitate towards the present perfect. Then, with some numbers and with some time, this practice will also creep into the language use of native speakers. The development in Switzerland with its large French and Italian minorities supports this.

I bet that y'all will be saying fuhr from now on. Don't let immigration kill the natural beauty of the German language. :)

Germaid
Saturday, August 13th, 2011, 05:47 PM
Conditional I is also deteriorating. For example, for "If he went to his aunt, he'd get some free cake" we no longer say "Ginge er zu seiner Tante, ...", but "würde er zu seiner Tante gehen, ...".

It's not wrong, but it's not very good German and it's getting more and more common.

Goomer
Saturday, August 13th, 2011, 06:15 PM
Maybe studying this thread is a good way to relearn the German one has forgotten, because no opportunities exist where she lives to speak it?
:)

Germaid
Saturday, August 13th, 2011, 06:18 PM
Maybe studying this thread is a good way to relearn the German one has forgotten, because no opportunities exist where she lives to speak it?
:)

Did you learn it in school? If you have any questions, feel free to ask :)

Goomer
Saturday, August 13th, 2011, 07:45 PM
Did you learn it in school? If you have any questions, feel free to ask :)

Yes. I took a full year of College German. Germanic languages are MUCH more interesting for me, and I already knew that I hated Spanish from junior high school.

It's been 15+ years since I took German. Good to see this thread is even here, for I plan to read it and see if it helps jog my memory a bit:)

Northern Paladin
Saturday, August 13th, 2011, 09:11 PM
1) Yes ____, I will get it fixed soon.

2) I hope this translation is correct.

3) My bike was stolen two days ago.

4) It was taken from my backyard.

5) I bought a new one.

6) It wasn't expensive.

7) I hope it will be fixed soon.

8) I'm sure the music was very interesting.

9) This music is very sublime.

10) There was a hail storm here an hour ago. Blueberry-sized hail fell from the sky.

11) I saw a group of minority men with flash lights.

12) I'm trying to learn German.

13) Thank you for your response!

Also, can someone please give me a literal translation of ''Hallo, ist da jemand?''

Doesn't ''da'' mean ''because''?

Amerikanerin
Sunday, August 14th, 2011, 01:08 AM
Also, can someone please give me a literal translation of ''Hallo, ist da jemand?''

Doesn't ''da'' mean ''because''?

I think "da" means "there". Your phrase translates to: "Hello, is there anyone there?"

Thusnelda
Sunday, August 14th, 2011, 02:40 AM
1) Yes ____, I will get it fixed soon.
Ja natürlich, ich werde das bald richten.


2) I hope this translation is correct.
Ich hoffe diese Übersetzung ist richtig.


3) My bike was stolen two days ago.
Mir wurde vor zwei Tagen mein Rad gestohlen (Or: Vor zwei Tagen wurde mir mein Rad gestohlen)


4) It was taken from my backyard.
Es wurde mir von meinem Hinterhof (or Garten) gestohlen.


5) I bought a new one.
Ich habe mir ein Neues gekauft. (Or: Ich kaufte mir ein Neues)


6) It wasn't expensive.
Es war nicht teuer.


7) I hope it will be fixed soon.
Ich hoffe es wird bald gerichtet (repariert)


8) I'm sure the music was very interesting.
Ich bin sicher daß die Musik sehr interessant war.


9) This music is very sublime.
Diese Musik ist großartig.


10) There was a hail storm here an hour ago. Blueberry-sized hail fell from the sky.
Vor einer Stunde gab es einen Hagelsturm. Blaubeergroße Hagelkörner fielen vom Himmel.


11) I saw a group of minority men with flash lights.
Ich sah eine Gruppe Ausländer mit Taschenlampen. (Or: Ich habe eine Gruppe Ausländer mit Taschenkampen gesehen)


12) I'm trying to learn German.
Ich versuche Deutsch zu lernen.


13) Thank you for your response!
Danke für deine Antwort!!


Also, can someone please give me a literal translation of ''Hallo, ist da jemand?''
Hello, is anybody there?


Doesn't ''da'' mean ''because''?
"da" can also mean "there", "since" and "as". An other, more common form of "because" is "weil". "Ich ging nach Hause weil es begann zu regnen" ("I went home because it started to rain"). It´s possible to construe the sentence with "da", anyway: "Ich ging nach Hause da es begann zu regnen".

Juthunge
Sunday, August 14th, 2011, 01:46 PM
But as I mentioned the "present perfect" seems to be slowly replacing the "simple past" entirely in normal spoken language.

According to wikipedia there also seems to be some regional variation of its usage with the simple past having almost entirely vanished in southern germany.

As a southern German I can definitely confirm this.
I had never really noticed until now but apart from a few words like sein, haben, werden, können, müssen, sollen, wollen, mögen, dürfen you won't hear anyone using Preterite in spoken language.

If anyone for example said "Ich aß ein Brot" instead of "Ich habe ein Brot gegessen" people would surely dart a look at you suggesting that they assumed you were mentally challenged (or some stiff, written language speaking Northern German :D).

But I think in our case it's not a recent development, apparently it has been like that since the 16th century.

Hesse
Sunday, August 14th, 2011, 04:59 PM
Maybe studying this thread is a good way to relearn the German one has forgotten, because no opportunities exist where she lives to speak it?
:)

I can certainly relate. I'm sure many of us can. ;)

Northern Paladin
Sunday, August 14th, 2011, 09:42 PM
What is the meaning of this sentence?

''und wenn ich nicht mehr kann, denk'ich daran''

Is it ''and when I no longer can, I think of it''?

And, can somebody please tell me the meaning of the last part of this sentence?

Darum lieb ich alles was so grün ist: Weil mein Schatz ´ne Gärtnerin ist.

I think the first part means: ''Therefore, I love all that is green''

Germaid
Sunday, August 14th, 2011, 09:48 PM
Yes, your translation is correct.

Weil mein Schatz 'ne Gärtnerin ist = because my darling is a gardener
The first part is also correct :)

'ne is the short colloquial form of "eine"

Amerikanerin
Sunday, August 14th, 2011, 10:56 PM
I have also heard the future tense is being replaced in spoken German by the simple present tense, for example: "Ich fahre morgen nach Berlin" instead of "Ich werde morgen nach Berlin fahren". However I still see the "ich werde... " structure in books all the time. To what extent is this true?

PS. This is definitely one of my fav threads :)

Schafkopf
Monday, August 15th, 2011, 12:40 PM
I have also heard the future tense is being replaced in spoken German by the simple present tense, for example: "Ich fahre morgen nach Berlin" instead of "Ich werde morgen nach Berlin fahren". However I still see the "ich werde... " structure in books all the time. To what extent is this true?

PS. This is definitely one of my fav threads :)

Ja, you are right.

We keep in mind, the used language (for young) is the shorter and easier one.

So, "Ich fahre" is shorter than "Ich werde fahren"

(The present says usually that he drives at the moment, but when you see him not sitting in a vehicle, you know that he will do it soon)

"Ich bin gefahren" is easier than "Ich fuhr" because it's much less work for non-native speakers to learn all conjugations and convert and use it

-> "fahren" into "gefahren" than in "fuhr"
-> "essen" into "gegessen" than in "aß"

I see some words are also difficult for native speakers ;)
Ok, my mother tongue isn't High German but I speak it often.
In south Germany and especially in dialects is it used more...


It's a lot of fun to "teach" you. I am at the moment in Canada also to improve my English, that's interesting :)

Northern Paladin
Tuesday, August 16th, 2011, 10:23 PM
Thank you very much everyone, especially Thusnelda, as well as Heinrich Harrer and Germaid for answering my questions in the shoutbox. I have memorized the sentences I posted and the language is really starting to set in.

I have decided to start learning through song/music, so I will post lyrics periodically. If anybody knows any good/easy folk songs please post them in this thread. I will try to do the same.

I have a few more sentences:

1) is the library open?
2) I like eating ____ (I enjoy eating ____)
3) I will do it tomorrow
4) it did not rain in over a month
5) I want to buy fruit and vegetables
6) what should I buy?
7) what do you want me to buy? (what would you like me to buy?)
8) I'm going to buy ____
9) I'm growing a mustache (beard)
10) there are many small towns in this area
11) I like to walk through the forest
12) close the door, I'm changing.
13) is somebody using this computer?
14) I need a new job

Germaid
Tuesday, August 16th, 2011, 10:33 PM
1) is the library open?
--> Ist die Bibliothek geöffnet?

2) I like eating ____ (I enjoy eating ____)
--> Ich esse gerne ____

3) I will do it tomorrow
--> Ich erledige es morgen. But rather say: Ich werde es morgen erledigen.

4) it did not rain in over a month
--> Es hat seit über einem Monat nicht mehr geregnet.

5) I want to buy fruit and vegetables
--> Ich will (or möchte) Obst und Gemüse kaufen.

6) what should I buy?
--> Was soll ich kaufen?

7) what do you want me to buy? (what would you like me to buy?)
--> Was soll ich (für dich) kaufen?

8) I'm going to buy ____
--> Ich kaufe ___ or better Ich werde ____ kaufen

9) I'm growing a mustache (beard)
--> Ich lasse mir gerade einen Schnauzer (Bart) wachsen.

10) there are many small towns in this area
--> In dieser Gegend gibt es viele kleine Ortschaften.

11) I like to walk through the forest
--> Ich gehe gerne durch den Wald.

12) close the door, I'm changing.
--> Schließ die Tür, ich ziehe mich gerade um.

13) is somebody using this computer?
--> Benutzt jemand diesen Computer?

14) I need a new job
--> Ich brauche eine neue Arbeit(sstelle).

Nooitgedacht
Wednesday, August 17th, 2011, 02:41 AM
Thank you for all the Q's and A's. I've learned a lot.:thumbup

My Mother used to talk German to my Grandparents, but we as kids only listened and never spoke it. A great pity!!

Now I read the German Newspapers and listen to German Radio (online).
I don't recognise all the words, but I get the picture. Many of the German folksongs on the radio/Skadi corresponds with the Afrikaans folksongs I grew up with.

I still only listen, but don't practice my German. My only G friend in Brisbane is very busy and I seldom see him.:~(

Northern Paladin
Friday, September 9th, 2011, 04:38 PM
Here is something useful :)

2xM2EZkZBu4

English lyrics, courtesy of user dominiquedv on YouTube.



When all fountains are flowing,
We have to drink,
If I am not allowed to call her,
I can make to her a sign.

Yes, make a sign with my eyes
And step on her foot,
There is one girl in the room
Which will belong to me.

Why would she not belong to me?
I love her so much.
She has two little blue eyes
They shine like two stars.

She has two little red cheeks,
Are more red than wine,
she has two little red cheeks
Are more red than wine,
You cannot find such another girl.
Under the whole sunshine.

If there's anything wrong with the above translation, can you please point it out and help me fix it?

Here's another version:

SQ05WgVr8_4

Hesse
Friday, September 30th, 2011, 01:33 AM
I have a short sentence in a letter from my great great grandfather I would like translated

It reads"

"Du kennst naemlich meine Absicht, schon vor zwei Jahren nach Amerika zu gehen, dieser Entschulss ist endlich zur Reisse gekommen"

What does he appear to be saying? The first part of the sentence is something like "You know indeed my intent" but what is the second? "already before two years to Amerika to go", does not make sense.

Frostbite
Friday, September 30th, 2011, 01:42 AM
I'm going to be taking German in the winter. I took 2 years in high school but I didn't really study :|

Anyone have any tips for studying a language? Part of the reason I didn't really learn anything was that I didn't know where to start.

Heinrich Harrer
Friday, September 30th, 2011, 01:54 AM
I have a short sentence in a letter from my great great grandfather I would like translated

It reads"

"Du kannst naemlich meine Absicht, schon vor zwei Jahren nach Amerika zu gehen, dieser Entschulss ist endlich zur Reisse gekommen"

What does he appear to be saying? The first part of the sentence is something like "You know indeed my intent" but what is the second? "already before two years to Amerika to go", does not make sense.

Can you scan it or make a photo? Perhaps you've misread something, because I don't understand the quote above either.


I'm going to be taking German in the winter. I took 2 years in high school but I didn't really study :|

Anyone have any tips for studying a language? Part of the reason I didn't really learn anything was that I didn't know where to start.

Someone recently suggested reading children's books, because the grammar/sentence structure is simpler. Then you can look up all the words/grammar rules you don't know yet as you encounter them.

Hesse
Friday, September 30th, 2011, 01:57 AM
Can you scan it or make a photo? Perhaps you've misread something, because I don't understand the quote above either.

How about leaving off the last part, just this part of the sentence below:

"Du kennst nämlich meine Absicht schon vor zwei Jahren nach Amerika zu gehen..."

Heinrich Harrer
Friday, September 30th, 2011, 02:48 AM
How about leaving off the last part, just this part of the sentence below:

"Du kennst nämlich meine Absicht schon vor zwei Jahren nach Amerika zu gehen..."

Difficult in isolation, perhaps:

"Cause you know my intention to go to America already two years ago..."

Something doesn't feel right with the tenses.

Gardisten
Friday, September 30th, 2011, 03:01 AM
The way that I'm reading it is that he had already discussed with the letter recipient that he had wanted to travel to the US two years ago, but was only now able to do so.

Hesse
Friday, October 21st, 2011, 09:23 PM
Dieser Satz, ich moechte Uebersetzt, bitte

"Der grosse Hof muss zu dieser Zeit geteilt worden sein daher die Unterscheidung zwischen Grosse und Kleine Langenkamp."

I make it out to be something like: "The large yard must have been divided at this time for there the distinction between large and small Langenkamp."

Gardisten
Friday, October 21st, 2011, 10:03 PM
Here's how I read it...

"The large farm must have been divided at about this time, hence the distinction between Gross and Klein Langenkamp."

you'll find many village names etc. differentiated by Gross and Klein. In translation it's best to maintain the German rather than cause confusion by trying to translate.


Dieser Satz, ich moechte Uebersetzt, bitte

"Der grosse Hof muss zu dieser Zeit geteilt worden sein daher die Unterscheidung zwischen Grosse und Kleine Langenkamp."

I make it out to be something like: "The large yard must have been divided at this time for there the distinction between large and small Langenkamp."

AnastasiaNatalja
Friday, October 21st, 2011, 10:17 PM
Dieser Satz, ich moechte Uebersetzt, bitte

"Der grosse Hof muss zu dieser Zeit geteilt worden sein daher die Unterscheidung zwischen Grosse und Kleine Langenkamp."

I make it out to be something like: "The large yard must have been divided at this time for there the distinction between large and small Langenkamp."

You translated it correctly. I don't know what "grosse und kleine Langenkamp" shall be exactly and I've never heard of much towns in Germany who start with "groß" or "klein" ;)

By the way, you should better say/write : "Ich würde diesen Satz gerne übersetzt haben" instead of "Dieser Satz, ich moechte Uebersetzt, bitte".

Yours is grammatically wrong ;)

Austin
Friday, October 21st, 2011, 10:59 PM
I'm going to be taking German in the winter. I took 2 years in high school but I didn't really study :|

Anyone have any tips for studying a language? Part of the reason I didn't really learn anything was that I didn't know where to start.

Find a German guy from Germany to teach you or some German American who knows.

When you have someone you're into it is amazing how much it helps when they try and teach you a language. Especially now with all the instant translation systems you can use through messengers and skype. It really helps if you have the opposite sex teaching you and you're both into one another. You'll learn much faster.

Then again I don't know your particular situation. Am just pointing this out. It's helped me in a lot of instances.

SaxonPagan
Friday, October 21st, 2011, 11:18 PM
Anyone have any tips for studying a language?

Listen to some radio. If you're a beginner then the news stations are the best ones for you because the speaker will pronounce the words more clearly. You will also have an idea what they are talking about by what is in the news at present.

Here is an excellent site ...

http://multilingualbooks.com/online-radio-german.html

Obviously, you will not understand very much when you begin (I'm assuming you're starting almost from scratch) but you will get odd words, then the odd sentence, and before long you'll find you're getting the general gist of what's being said.

It's all about not becoming too demoralised in the early stages and sticking with it!

Gardisten
Saturday, October 22nd, 2011, 03:22 AM
In all fairness, it was a reasonably good translation, but a key word--Hof--was not.

In googling Klein Langenkamp, this is what I found:

http://www.geodata.us/germany_names_maps/name.php?uni=-2511001&f=53

To the south one can see Gross Langenkamp, and if one zooms in on it, one can see that these are place names for farms.

If one zooms in to the point where smaller locations are listed, and one scans around just in the vicinity of the two Langenkamps, one can see that there are several other locations that are designated Gross / Klein. It's actually really not all that uncommon...


You translated it correctly. I don't know what "grosse und kleine Langenkamp" shall be exactly and I've never heard of much towns in Germany who start with "groß" or "klein" ;)

By the way, you should better say/write : "Ich würde diesen Satz gerne übersetzt haben" instead of "Dieser Satz, ich moechte Uebersetzt, bitte".

Yours is grammatically wrong ;)

Ingvaeonic
Saturday, October 22nd, 2011, 08:17 AM
Conditional I is also deteriorating. For example, for "If he went to his aunt, he'd get some free cake" we no longer say "Ginge er zu seiner Tante, ...", but "würde er zu seiner Tante gehen, ...".

It's not wrong, but it's not very good German and it's getting more and more common.

Is German usage declining because there is a decline in German-language education? Has there been a noticeable drop in standards in German-language education?

English usage has declined markedly in the last 30 years as a result in ever-declining standards in English education; many "English" teachers perpetuate mistakes and often take the line of least resistance rather than teaching what is grammatically correct, because that's too "hard". English-language education in this country is very bad and has been for a long time; indeed, it is getting worse.

Germaid
Saturday, October 22nd, 2011, 05:47 PM
I'm not aware of any decline in German grammar lessons. In my school days we had intense German grammar lessons and I don't think the curriculum has changed a lot in the last years.

The conditional I was only an example. Even though I know it's correct to say 'Ginge ich...' instead of 'Würde ich zu.. gehen...', it sounds unnatural and kind of outdated in my ears. It's just no longer common. It's used in literature but has lost its importance in spoken language. Though there are freaks like me who still use it from time to time, just to keep it in practice :)

SaxonPagan
Saturday, October 22nd, 2011, 06:16 PM
Germaid, perhaps you can help me :)

I always say;

"Wenn es nach mir ginge, würde ich..."

instead of;

"Wenn es nach mir gehen würde, würde ich ..."

Simply because it seems to flow better than the heavier construction with the two 'würdes' together. So, are you saying that I should avoid the conditional I and stick to the würde + infinitive version?

I'm asking because my German is not bad overall but I don't get much speaking practice these days and so have fallen behind a bit with modern usage.

Germaid
Saturday, October 22nd, 2011, 06:21 PM
In this case I'd use the classic conditional I, too. Two times "würde" in one sentence sounds strange.

I think your German is not only "not bad", I think it's almost perfect :) I wish my English was as good as your German.

SaxonPagan
Saturday, October 22nd, 2011, 07:38 PM
No, seriously, your English is better than my German, Germaid!

I actually spoke German more fluently 25 years ago (when I had a German girlfriend) than I do today and I only started re-learning it about 3-4 years ago, shortly before joining Skadi. It must have stuck in my subconscious somewhere because it's not as difficult the second time around, but it does feel a bit weird sometimes :scratch

Another issue I have is with the simple and compound past tenses. I know them all thoroughly, but can never decide when to use each one. I think Heinrich recently mentioned on here that everyone tends to go for the compound version these days (in speech) so I'm happy enough with that, but I still chuck in the odd simple past when it just 'sounds right' to me.

I think my main problem though is that I'm listening to far too many Adolf Hitler speeches on the Internet and the next time I go to Germany they'll think I'm some kind of throwback to the 1930's :D

AnastasiaNatalja
Saturday, October 22nd, 2011, 09:06 PM
In all fairness, it was a reasonably good translation, but a key word--Hof--was not.

In googling Klein Langenkamp, this is what I found:

http://www.geodata.us/germany_names_maps/name.php?uni=-2511001&f=53

To the south one can see Gross Langenkamp, and if one zooms in on it, one can see that these are place names for farms.

If one zooms in to the point where smaller locations are listed, and one scans around just in the vicinity of the two Langenkamps, one can see that there are several other locations that are designated Gross / Klein. It's actually really not all that uncommon...

Well, in my area it's uncommon and I've never heard much of it.
I'm sorry that my estimation was wrong, I was just trying to help ;)

Germaid
Sunday, October 23rd, 2011, 09:40 PM
Another issue I have is with the simple and compound past tenses. I know them all thoroughly, but can never decide when to use each one. I think Heinrich recently mentioned on here that everyone tends to go for the compound version these days (in speech) so I'm happy enough with that, but I still chuck in the odd simple past when it just 'sounds right' to me.

Heinrich is right, present perfect has become more common than simple past in spoken language. If you stick to simple past, it's fine too, it might sound a bit overblown but it's correct. Past perfect is used exactly as in English.

Hesse
Sunday, October 23rd, 2011, 11:04 PM
You translated it correctly. I don't know what "grosse und kleine Langenkamp" shall be exactly and I've never heard of much towns in Germany who start with "groß" or "klein" ;)



In my reference, it was the name of a person, not a town. Klein and groß were their surname denotations.



By the way, you should better say/write : "Ich würde diesen Satz gerne übersetzt haben" instead of "Dieser Satz, ich moechte Uebersetzt, bitte".

Yours is grammatically wrong ;)

Yes, "Ich würde diesen Satz gerne übersetzt haben" definitely is a better sentence and but isn't "Dieser Satz, ich moechte Uebersetzt, bitte" translating to "This sentence, I would like translated please"? Although the former is unarguably preferable.

Heinrich Harrer
Sunday, October 23rd, 2011, 11:59 PM
Yes, "Ich würde diesen Satz gerne übersetzt haben" definitely is a better sentence and but isn't "Dieser Satz, ich moechte Uebersetzt, bitte" translating to "This sentence, I would like translated please"? Although the former is unarguably preferable.

Different languages have different grammar rules and sentence patterns, so literal word for word translations are often wrong - as in this case.

If you want something closer to what you wrote:
"Diesen Satz möchte ich übersetzt haben, bitte."

Hesse
Sunday, December 25th, 2011, 03:30 AM
Wie sagt man auf Deutsch?:

1. to trace back, as in tracing back genealogy

2. to be in contact or in touch with

3. "Where we came from", "the people who lived there" (sentence structure)

Danke

Germaid
Sunday, December 25th, 2011, 03:58 PM
1. zurückverfolgen

2. mit jemandem in Kontakt stehen / sein

3. "Woher wir kamen" or "Wo wir herkamen", "Die Menschen, die dort lebten"

Hesse
Wednesday, December 28th, 2011, 04:07 PM
Wie sagt man auf Deutsch:

"I hope that we can stay in contact, and continue to write to each other."

My guess for the first clause: Ich hoffe, wir koennen in Kontakt bleiben.

Completely lost on the second

Thusnelda
Wednesday, December 28th, 2011, 05:14 PM
Wie sagt man auf Deutsch:

"I hope that we can stay in contact, and continue to write to each other."

My guess for the first clause: Ich hoffe, wir koennen in Kontakt bleiben.

Completely lost on the second
"Ich hoffe wir können in Kontakt bleiben und uns weiterhin schreiben."

Hesse
Tuesday, January 3rd, 2012, 06:12 AM
Wie sagt man auf Deutsch diesen Englischen wort "embarrassed"?

thoughtcrime
Tuesday, January 3rd, 2012, 07:01 AM
Wie sagt man auf Deutsch diesen Englischen wort "embarrassed"?

"Embarrassed" würde ich als "verlegen" übersetzen. "Wort" ist aber ein Neutrum, in Deinem Satz muss es "...dieses englische Wort" heißen.

Germaid
Tuesday, January 3rd, 2012, 01:04 PM
Hesse, you can also use "peinlich" for embarrassed.

Be careful:

You must say "Er / sie / es / war ihm peinlich." If you say "Er war peinlich", it means he embarrassed somebody else, which alters the meaning completely.

Hesse
Tuesday, January 3rd, 2012, 01:44 PM
Hesse, you can also use "peinlich" for embarrassed.

Be careful:

You must say "Er / sie / es / war ihm peinlich." If you say "Er war peinlich", it means he embarrassed somebody else, which alters the meaning completely.

Can you say "Ich bin peinlich"?

thoughtcrime
Tuesday, January 3rd, 2012, 03:19 PM
Can you say "Ich bin peinlich"?

Yes, but as Germaid pointed out, that would mean "I'm embarassing", not "I'm embarassed".

To express the latter, you could say "Ich bin peinlich berührt".

Hesse
Tuesday, January 3rd, 2012, 04:19 PM
Wie sagt man auf Deutsch "I would be better off"...

Juthunge
Tuesday, January 3rd, 2012, 04:27 PM
I'd translate it as "Ich wäre besser dran, (wenn)..." but it depends strongly on the context in which the phrase is uttered.

CruxClaire
Sunday, February 12th, 2012, 12:35 AM
I have a question about German grammar, particularly with the Genitive case:

If one uses an adjective as a noun (e.g. "Der Arme hat keine Freunde") and uses such a noun in Genitive, does one no longer need to add -s/-es to the end of the word? I ask because I've heard or read examples where the -s/-es isn't added, like this line from a Klee song:


Wir sind Teil eines Ganzen, das größer ist als du und ich

So do the rules change if the noun in the Genitive case is derived from an adjective?

Neophyte
Sunday, February 12th, 2012, 01:36 PM
I have a question about German grammar, particularly with the Genitive case:

If one uses an adjective as a noun (e.g. "Der Arme hat keine Freunde") and uses such a noun in Genitive, does one no longer need to add -s/-es to the end of the word? I ask because I've heard or read examples where the -s/-es isn't added, like this line from a Klee song:



So do the rules change if the noun in the Genitive case is derived from an adjective?

Der Arme is 5th declination and is thus des Armen in genitive.

Oslaf
Sunday, February 19th, 2012, 06:16 AM
Ist dieser Satz richtig?
Das Flugzeug soll kommt um 16 Uhr in Zürich an.

Juthunge
Sunday, February 19th, 2012, 11:08 AM
Ist dieser Satz richtig?
Das Flugzeug soll kommt um 16 Uhr in Zürich an.

Depending on what you're trying to say it could be either "Das Flugzeug kommt um 16 Uhr in Zürich an."(The plane arrives in Zürich around/at 4 o'clock.),
"Das Flugzeug wird um 16 uhr in Zürich ankommen"(The plane will arrive in Zürich around/at 4 o'clock.) or
"Das Flugzeug sollte um 16 Uhr in Zürich ankommen."(The plane should arrive in Zürich around/at 4 o'clock.)

Oslaf
Sunday, February 19th, 2012, 06:43 PM
Depending on what you're trying to say it could be either
"Das Flugzeug sollte um 16 Uhr in Zürich ankommen."(The plane should arrive in Zürich around/at 4 o'clock.)
Warum braucht man das Präteritum für "soll"?

Nevermind, one would do the same in English too. It seemed odd because we have not learned the preterites of sollen yet. I generally try to learn things like this intuitively instead of memorizing rules.

SaxonPagan
Sunday, February 19th, 2012, 07:17 PM
'Sollte' equates to the English 'should' more often than not.

Modal verbs can be a nightmare but just remember the Verb am Ende formula once you've used one ;)

arvak
Tuesday, February 21st, 2012, 07:24 PM
When I was learning German I got stuck on this part.
In English.
How is this written in German please.

To change ones clothes?
I am going to change?
I am changing?
Have you changed?
Are you going to change?

Germaid
Tuesday, February 21st, 2012, 07:44 PM
When I was learning German I got stuck on this part.
In English.
How is this written in German please.

To change ones clothes?
I am going to change?
I am changing?
Have you changed?
Are you going to change?

Sich umziehen
Ich werde mich umziehen.
Ich ziehe mich gerade um.
Hast du dich umgezogen?
Wirst du dich umziehen?

Sawyer
Saturday, August 4th, 2012, 04:02 PM
I'll attempt to translate this paragraph from a post of mine to see how well I can.


It depends on what your argument is for having guns. Sure, you can have guns in the UK, the thing is that it is really just for sporting purposes to own one; if it were for self-defence you wouldn't have to keep it in a safe with the ammo separate.

The bearing of arms in the US has always been for self-defence, how else were they going to defend themselves against the Injuns if the ranchers couldn't own arms? They would've been slaughtered, and it would've been impractical to have the US Army protecting everyone.

Es hängt von was deine Argument ist für Schußwaffenbesitz ab. Natürlich, man kann Gewehre in England besitzen, aber sie sind wirklich für Sportzwecke; wenn es war für Notwehr, man müßte nicht es in Sicherheit aufbewahren, mit der Munition getrennter.

Das Recht zu tragen Waffen in Amerika hat immer für Notwehr existierten. Wie noch würden sie sich selbst gegen die Indianer wehren, wenn könnte nicht die Rancher tragen Waffen? Sie wären abschlachteten gewesen; und es wäre unmöglich gewesen, zu haben das US Heer schützen alle.

**

I just want to see how many holes I've completely missed in grammar and/or correct use of vocabulary, I always do. :P

Germaid
Saturday, August 4th, 2012, 04:33 PM
Not bad! :)

This is my translation:

Es hängt von deinem Argument für den Waffenbesitz ab. Sicherlich darf man im Vereinigten Königreich Waffen besitzen, allerdings nur für Sportzwecke. Zur Selbstverteidigung müsste man sie nicht von der Munition getrennt in einem Sicherheitsschrank aufbewahren.

In den USA war das Tragen von Waffen schon immer zur Selbstverteidigung gedacht, wie hätten sie sich gegen Indianer verteidigen sollen, wenn die Rancher keine Waffen hätten tragen dürfen? Sie wären abgeschlachtet worden und für die Armee wäre es unmöglich gewesen, jeden zu schützen.