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View Full Version : Obesity Epidemic Demands Legislation.



Ælfrun
Wednesday, April 27th, 2011, 07:48 AM
Canada's obesity epidemic needs legislative approaches such as taxing junk food, setting standard portion sizes and nutritional labels, and banning trans fat, researchers say.

"Obesity is expected to surpass smoking as the leading cause of preventable morbidity and mortality," Dr. Mark Eisenberg of Jewish General Hospital and his co-authors wrote in Tuesday's issue of the Canadian Medical Association Journal.

The authors argue that a public health approach is needed to fight obesity in both adults and children, and its toll on life expectancy when combined with heart disease, high blood pressure, stroke, Type 2 diabetes and other illnesses.

"Legislative approaches, together with environmental modifications, can be an effective means of reversing the growing problem of obesity in Canada," the authors say.

They discuss the advantages and disadvantages of legislative approaches including:
A tax on junk food, saying it remains unclear whether such a tax is feasible or appropriate.

Improved nutritional labels, such as the U.K.'s "traffic-light system" of voluntary red, green and amber colour codes to indicate the nutritional value of foods, combined with educational programs.
Clearly defined serving sizes to compare products more easily and reflect "real-world" portions.

A ban on trans fats and regulation of sodium content.
Modifying neighbourhoods to provide opportunities for safe physical activity, such as providing well-lit sidewalks and bicycle paths.

Zoning bylaws to regulate the number and density of fast-food restaurants and their distance from schools and hospitals or to ban them from specified areas and neighbourhoods.

Requiring restaurants to display calorie counts on menus to increase awareness and influence consumer choice.

Banning advertisements for unhealthy foods, though the researchers say the link between the ads and poor health outcomes is still unclear.
Banning the sale of junk food in schools.

Obesity has traditionally been viewed as a physical problem for doctors to treat, but there is an increasing awareness of the role that governments, corporations and educators can play in preventing and reducing the problem, the researchers say.

"The growing problem of obesity in Canada can be reversed only with an integrated approach involving both the public health and medical models," the authors conclude.

"There is a greater need than ever for strong political will to effect these complex societal changes, and for champions at all levels of government to step forward and do so in new, innovative and effective ways."
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/story/2011/04/26/obesity-legislate.html

I agree with this. It is disgusting how lazy and unhealthy Canadians are. Canadian children are very obese and have diabetes at an early age. something needs to be done.

Caledonian
Wednesday, April 27th, 2011, 08:01 AM
I don't think legislation of any kind should be introduced into people's diet or how they eat. There are even limits I believe in when it concerns state intervention.

Instead people need to have more restraint when it concerns over eating or parents need to be more considerate of their children's eating habits.

Common sense really although I do know it's not very common place anymore...

Ælfrun
Wednesday, April 27th, 2011, 08:24 AM
I think it is a good idea, although it is another form of controlling our people. Something needs to be done though.

Caledonian
Wednesday, April 27th, 2011, 08:27 AM
I think it is a good idea, although it is another form of controlling our people. Something needs to be done though.

People just need to be more self conscious of their decision making.

Ælfrun
Thursday, April 28th, 2011, 06:56 AM
Yes, but good luck with that. We have an epidemic of Laziness. People do not care about themselves for the most part.

Hersir
Thursday, April 28th, 2011, 01:51 PM
I don't think legislation of any kind should be introduced into people's diet or how they eat. There are even limits I believe in when it concerns state intervention.

Instead people need to have more restraint when it concerns over eating or parents need to be more considerate of their children's eating habits.

Common sense really although I do know it's not very common place anymore...

You call yourself a national socialist, and you dont think it would be good with legislation or limiting? I care about my peoples health, and I would be glad if kebabs, mcdonalds, burger king, coca cola etc. would be banned. You actually get addicted from eating unhealthy food. I wish our government would make healthy food cheaper, it is currently the most expensive. Many Norwegians travel to Sweden to shop for groceries, healthy food is much cheaper there.

We cant even find brown rice at the store here.

I think children should be taught from early on about a healthy diet and lifestyle, afterall they inherit their parents eating habits.

Ælfrun
Thursday, April 28th, 2011, 02:19 PM
We cant even find brown rice at the store here.



That is ridiculous!

velvet
Thursday, April 28th, 2011, 02:37 PM
I agree with this. It is disgusting how lazy and unhealthy Canadians are. Canadian children are very obese and have diabetes at an early age. something needs to be done.

Same problem everywhere. As Hersir said, healthy food is much more expensive than all the heavily processed mass products.

The last 50+ years "cheap" was the nonplusultra, I think people and parents simply dont know anymore what healthy food is (or what to do with it), because this never was a topic. Common sense won't help there.

Germany has an increasing obesity problem too, specially of kids, and in some schools they've started projects to teach the kids cooking with real food and stuff and to teach them what their parents dont know anymore, which I think is a good thing to do. Hope this becomes standard for all schools.

We also have this fast-food regulation already for a long time, in McD restaurants there are large posters that inform about incredients and calory levels and what not. McD here has really picked this up, they use only products from Germany and do themselves heavy controls, more than the law would ask of them, they've also increased the amount of products that come with salad and veggies, so there is indeed some room for improvement even of fast food.


Other regulations have been less successful though, the "panicking" about fats for example has been made into something quite ridiculous, products that are naturally free of fats get advertised with "fat free", while the fact that it has hundreds of calories is covered through that. Same with this retarded "light" products (the try to mark low calory food for "easy selection"), something went quite wrong with that regulation, and so some "light" products end up with having actually more calories than the normal variant has, in yoghurt this is very widespread, but also other products.

But while regulations certainly can help, I think the most important thing is to teach the people what to do with real and healthy food again, with only marking products with a red point or something you cant change people's behavior.

And - pay attention to who does the regulation, not that you end up with Monsanto-products being promoted, or like in Denmark, where the "healthy sandwiches" for school kids have been only introduced to pander to Muslims, ie with halal food. :oanieyes

Ælfrun
Thursday, April 28th, 2011, 02:42 PM
Other regulations have been less successful though, the "panicking" about fats for example has been made into something quite ridiculous, products that are naturally free of fats get advertised with "fat free", while the fact that it has hundreds of calories is covered through that. Same with this retarded "light" products (the try to mark low calory food for "easy selection"), something went quite wrong with that regulation, and so some "light" products end up with having actually more calories than the normal variant has, in yoghurt this is very widespread, but also other products.



I agree with you. A lot of these fats are actually good for you and are fats the the body needs to function properly.

Patrioten
Thursday, April 28th, 2011, 02:43 PM
What's needed also is more exercise among those that don't exercise, those who never start to exercise, those that start but quit at a young age, those that skip out on physical education classes. If a child is prone to obesity and adopts an immobile lifestyle then I think it would be difficult for that child to fend off obesity in society today. Getting them to move around alot more is key I think. Physical education might be a platform for this. With more involved teachers that are actually there to teach and coach the children into learning how to take care of themselves. My experiences from physical education, for the most part, was basically day care. There was no solid direction, there was no focus on individual achievement.

Also if physical education is supposed to be worth while, it cannot be a play ground merely for those that are athletically talented or those that already have physical exercise outside of school. Encouraging good examples is of course a good thing, and those that do excel athletically should get recognition, but it needs to involve those that don't alot more if the benefits of physical exercise is supposed to reach those that need it. It doesn't have to be about the lowest common denomenator, but make it into an education with personal encouragement and guidance between the teacher and student so that everyone, and especially those that need it the most, are involved.